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SUPPORT

IN
COMPLETE DENTURES

Complete
denture

INTRODUCTION

If the dentures and their supporting tissues are to coexist


for a reasonable length of time ,the dentist must fully
understand the anatomy of supporting and limiting
structures involved.

Incorporation of certain biological and physical factors


are necessary to ensure optimal complete denture
support.

COMPLETE

DENTURE SUPPORT IS,

Resistance to vertical movement of


the denture base towards tissue.
Counteracts forces towards ridges.
Support

relationship

between

denture base & tissue surface


Maintain

established

occlusal

relation ,promote optimal function,


with minimal tissue ward movement
& base settling.

DEFINITION
GPT
The foundation area on which the denture
prosthesis rest.

BOUCHER
The resistance to the vertical forces of
mastication, occlusal forces & other forces
applied in a direction towards the denture
bearing area.

TYPES OF SUPPORT
CONSIDERED IN 2 POINTS OF VIEW;

1.Dentures should confine to the underlying


tissues

so that the occlusal forces can

correctly oppose to one another at initial


closure & under functional loading.

2.The denture should maintain this for a period


of time for the longevity of the dentures

SUPPORT IS ACHIEVED ,
INITIALLY
By impression procedures that provide optimal
extension & functional loading

of the supporting

tissue which vary in their resiliency.


LONG TERM

Directing the forces of occlusal loading


those tissue

towards

most resistant to remodeling &

resorptive changes.

FACTORS AFFECTING
SUPPORT
1. Contour & quality of the residual ridge .
2. Extent of residual ridge coverage by denture
base.

3.Type & accuracy of the impression registration


4. Accuracy of the fit of the denture base .
5. Total occlusal load applied.

EFFECTIVE SUPPORT IS REALIZED


WHEN,

SNOWSHOE PRINCIPLE
Of maximal extension is that
given a constant occlusal force,
broader denture bearing area
decreases the stress per unit area
under the denture base, decreases
tissue

displacement

denture base movement.

,reduces

NATURE OF THE SUPPORTING


TISSUES
1. SOFT TISSUE
2.HARD TISSUE

3.BONE FACTOR

SOFT
TISSUES
Supporting soft tissues must

be

capable

of

withstanding the pressure induced through normal


function of prosthesis.

Presence

of

keratinized,

firmly

bound

permits the tissue to better resist stress.

mucosa

Presence of layer of resilient submucosa permits


moderate

compressibility

without

mechanical

impingement of mucosa between the denture base &

underlying bone

The fatty & glandular mucosa acts as a hydraulic


cushion

HARD
TISSUES
Requirement of ideal support
is the presence of tissue that
are relatively resistant to
remodeling and resorptive
changes.

In case of over denture,


preserving teeth retains not
only

alveolar

supporting

teeth

bone
but

also

alveolar bone adjacent to


teeth.

BONE FACTOR

It can be determined by studying the previous


response of patients bone to stress.

Such stress may be in the form of extractions,


surgical trauma, forces generated by functioning

prosthesis.

Bone responds to force by remodelingWOLFS LAW


The supporting alveolar bone may differ in its

response to

stress as compared to basal residual

ridge bone.
Response of bone to stress is related to local
anatomic and physiologic variations within and
between individuals
Pressure tension concept:
pressure stimulates resorption ; tension maintains the
integrity or deposition

Cortical bone more resistant to resorption


Hence used in support of denture as recorded
relations are maintained over longer periods of
time.
Muscle fiber attachments ensure tension on
bone. This minimizes resorptive changes.

ANATOMIC CONSIDERATION OF
DENTURE BEARING AREA
AS EDWARDS & BOUCHER NOTED;

Since the success of the complete denture depends

largely on the relation of the dentures to anatomic


structures which support & limit them, familiarity with
the location & character of these structures is
essential.