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Natural gas in Malaysia

01 bscf per day. • As at 31 March 2008. approximately three times the size of crude oil reserves of 5.67 billion barrels of oil equivalent. .46 billion barrels.0 trillion standard cubic feet (tscf) or 14. Malaysia's production of natural gas averaged 7. •In 2007. PETRONAS Carigali. •About 50% of these producing fields are solely operated by PETRONAS's subsidiary. • As at January 2008. Malaysia's gas reserves stood at 88. Malaysia had 88 producing fields of which 61 were oil fields and 27 gas fields.Natural Gas in Malaysia •Malaysia has the 14th largest gas reserves as at January 2008.

MALAYSIAN NATURAL GAS RESERVES Malaysia is ranked 14th in the world in terms of its gas reserves.5 trillion standard cubic feet (tscf) or 38% is found off the East Coast of Peninsular Malaysia.8 tscf (48%) offshore Sarawak and the remaining 12. As at 1 January 2008. Of this. .0 trillion standard cubic feet (tscf) or 14. At the current rate of production. 41.7 tscf (14%) offshore Sabah.67 billion barrels of oil equivalent. the natural gas reserves in Malaysia stood at 88.46 billion barrel. 33. Malaysia's gas reserves expected to last another 36 years. approximately three times the size of crude oil reserves of 5.

As at 31 March 2008. now spans over 1. comprising main gas transmission pipelines. The system also comprises of six gas-processing plants with a combined capacity of 2. propane. The gas moves at about 24km/h . Malaysia had 88 producing fields of which 61 were oil fields and 27 gas fields.700km. A typical pipeline may contain a pressure of about 65 atmospheres. PETRONAS Carigali. butane and condensate. which commenced in 1984. supply pipelines and laterals.01 bscf per day. Malaysia's production of natural gas averaged 7. The PGU Project. producing methane. About 50% of these producing fields are solely operated by PETRONAS's subsidiary.000 million standard cubic feet per day (mmscfd).PENINSULAR GAS UTILISATION PROJECT In 2007. ethane.

Pipe Lines .

an average of 330 million standard cubic feet per day (mmscfd) of sales gas from Phase 1 of MTJDA is being transmitted through the PGU system since 20 February 2005. . 360 km Trans Thailand .Malaysia (TTM) Gas Pipeline system was linked to the PGU pipeline system to transport gas from Changlun in the northern part of Peninsular Malaysia to the Malaysia – Thailand Joint Development Area (MTJDA).PGU. TTM and TAGP Peninsular Gas Utilisation (PGU) system was operational in December 1997  Development of the Trans-ASEAN Gas Pipeline (TAGP) system to ensure the security of energy supply in the region by 2020.

the Gas Separation Plant owned and operated by Trans Thailand Malaysia (Thailand) Ltd. With this commissioning. . The supply for Peninsular Malaysia is also complemented by the gas from the Indonesian West Natuna B and the PM3 fields (Commercial Allocation Arrangement between PETRONAS Carigali Sendirian Berhad.TTM. Terengganu. the additional gas supply provides a significant fit to the forthcoming TAGP network. additional gas supply from the MTJDA is made available into the PGU system. Talisman and PETROVIETNAM) at the current average rate of 245 mmscfd and 120 mmscfd respectively.commenced operation.50:50 joint ventures between PETRONAS and the Petroleum Authority of Thailand . . At the same time. hence enhancing the security of gas supply to Peninsular Malaysia in addition to existing supply from Kertih. TAGP In July 2005. MTJDAPGU.

assessing potential import sources and doubling efforts to monetise gas from high CO2 and small gas fields . The future reserve fields have the following characteristics: High CO2 content ranging from 12% to 40%. to date about 20% of Peninsular Malaysia's gas demand is met by import sources. based on current reserves. Malaysia imports gas from the neighbouring countries – West Natuna B (Indonesia) and JDA.Enhancing security and sustainability of gas supply Production of gas from indigenous sources is expected to decline in a decade. •Future gas development from domestic reserves will be more challenging. Smaller fields and fields that are scattered far from existing developed fields High cost of development PETRONAS also plans to introduce various measures such as capping the demand (in the short term). This is expected to increase when the volume from West Natuna B and JDA increases to 250 mmscfd and 390 mmscfd respectively.

at a pressure of from about 600 psia to about 1200 psia to remove most of the carbon dioxide content as liquefied carbon dioxide. passing the gas stream through a stripping zone at a temperature of from about -20° to about 0° F. . at a pressure of from about 600 psia to about 1200 psia to remove liquid condensate and Step 2.CO2 Removal-Cryogenic Process A process for pretreating a natural gas stream having greater than about 40 mole % carbon dioxide Step 1: passing the gas stream through a separator zone at a temperature of from about 30° to about 80° F.

Fuel Mix for Electricity Generation Coal Oil Gas Hydro Other 2002 6 9 74 11 2010 36 1 56 7 1 2020 45 1 48 6 1 2030 50 0 45 4 1 .

Natural Gas Consumption by Sectors 1990 .2007 .