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Football kits: 13 of the most

weird and horrendous jerseys
in history

Nottingham Forest decked
themselves out in this garish 'Jackson
Pollock' number away from home
between 1995 and 1997, recalls
iposter. Indeed, they wore it in the
Quarter-finals of the Uefa Cup in the
95-96 season, when they were
dispatched 7-2 on aggregate by the
eventual winners, Bayern Munich.

How could we forget this one?
Like a Magic Eye book, it might
take you a minute to spot what was
going on in this Fiorentina design
from 1992-93 yep, that's right, a
few dozen swastika-style lines were
'accidentally' incorporated into
what the manufacturers called
'an optical effect'.

Many of you wrote about this tigerprint kit that we felt obliged to dig it
up. Presumably all Hull's future kits
will be like this now the owner,
Assem Allam, has changed the
club's name to Hull City Tigers
against fans‘ Wishes.

Anyone thinking the 90s was the most
visually offensive era for kit design should
have a look at Liverpool's recent efforts. If
this one isn't bad enough, their third kit is
Split into thirds. The days of the classic
Crown Paints kit are long gone.

Bilbao became a home for Spanish
arts when Frank Gehry's
Guggenheim Museum opened in
1997. Seven years later, to mark the
local football club's centenary,
Basque artist Dario Urzay, inspired
by works he'd seen at the museum,
designed this splatter-effect football
kit - as highlighted by Richmutey.

UncleFester proposed Barcelona's
'Sunny Delight‘ away kit as a
contender for the worst design - or
The most thirst-inducing. More
shocking, perhaps, was their kit 12
months earlier when They ended
their long and admirable refusal to
Wear corporate sponsorship on
their shirts.

OpiumEater reminds us of VfL
Bochum's technicolour attire from
1997. Handy as it is to wear a paint
chart, the idea didn't stick. Not that
Bochum's kits have improved: this
Distressed design is rather, umm,
Distressing.

In the long and unglamorous history of awful football kits, no one
Has ever dared create a kit that looks like a stick of broccoli – until
this one. La Hoya Lorca, who were in the Spanish Tercera Division,
unveiled this outrageous kit last season. The club is based in Murcia,
'the vegetable garden of Spain' – justification of sorts for a truly
bizarre design. They
went on to win the
league last season
and, fittingly,
they've
released
another broccolibased design this
season.

Coventry City have been much
derided for their infamous brown
'egg-timer' kit of the 1970s, often
cited as the worst kit of all time,
but this supposedly ingenious
design, worn from 1981-83,
trumps even that one. The
Brainchild of former manager
Jimmy Hill, it incorporated the
sponsor's logo into the kit design,
giving the brand extra emphasis.

Goalkeepers jerseys have a rich
tradition of being garish. But none
Could beat this one, a fluorescent
Count Dracula effort, designed and
Worn by Mexico's goalkeeper Jorge
Campos at the 1994 World Cup.

Here's an unusual design with an interesting premise. SC
Heereveen's kit is based on the Frisian flag, the official flag of the
Dutch province of Friesland. The seven red Pompeblêd – seal lily
leaves – symbolise seven independent regions from Medieval times.

Recreativo opted for a polkadot away kit last season – and what's
most surprising is that Danish manufacturing legends Hummel were
responsible for it. It was predictably mocked for looking like it was
inspired by Minnie Mouse.

Japanese side Shimizu S-Pulse have
a habit of wearing eye-popping
kits – this effort, from 2001, is
among of collection of bright
orange designs featuring world
maps across the chest. Also the
subtle camouflage pattern in the
background

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