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Geisler, Norman, Vol.

3 Systematic THTheology II 513 Systematic Theology Week Eleven, Session 1
Dr. Mark E. Hardgrove

Systematic Theology II Geisler, Norman, Vol. 3 Chapter Nine “The Nature of Salvation” pp. 220-257

Substitutionary Atonement
The process of salvation begins before a sinner makes a confession of faith. It is God who takes the initiative in salvation, not the sinner. Geisler call this pre-salvation acts of God. He includes: election, chosen (or chose), predestined, foreknowledge, calling, conviction, and prevenient grace.

Names of God’s Saving Acts
Effectual Grace: efficacious in producing salvation. Sealing: As salvific act that guarantees our ultimate salvation (Geisler, p. 223). A Wesleyan view is that being sealed by the Holy Spirit means one is marked as the possession of God and therefore has entered into the saving covenant with God.

Names of God’s Saving Acts
Salvation (or save): From the Greek soteria and soterion, meaning, “deliverance,” “preservation,” or “salvation.” Used of both physical and spiritual savation. Redemption: meaning “to ransom,” “to deliver,” “to buy back,” “purchasing.” Mediation: Hebrew, yakach, is used in Job 9:33. The Greek, mesitas is used to refer to Jesus as our mediator—prophet, priest, and king.

Names of God’s Saving Acts
Regeneration: from the Greek paliggenesia, which means “regeneration,” “rebirth,” or “spiritual renovation.” It is the impartation of spiritual life, by God, to the souls of those who were dead in trespasses and sins. Born Again: is parallel to regeneration. Rebith is the point at which a person “dead in trespasses and sins” (Eph. 2:1) receives spiritual life.

Names of God’s Saving Acts
Adoption: means, “placing as a son.” Adoption is the term of position whereby one becomes a son by the new birth. Reconciliation: from the Greek katallasso, which means ‘to reconcile,” or “to bring together.” Forgiveness: from the Greek aphesis, which means “to forgive” or “to remit” one’s sins. “Through Jesus the forgiveness of sins is proclaimed to you” (Acts 13:38).

Names of God’s Saving Acts
Justification: The act of God by which we who are unrighteous in ourselves are nevertheless declared righteous before God. It is a judicial (legal) ace of pronouncing one to be right in God’s sight. The Greek word dikaios means “just” or “right(eous),” while the Greek dikaioo means “justify” or “justified.” God declares a sinner righteous before Himself on the basis of faith alone.

Names of God’s Saving Acts
Propitiation (or Expiation): From the Greek hilasmos, meaning “to satisfy God on behalf of the sinner.” Also, hilasterion, which refers to the mercy seat in the OT tabernacle (Heb. 9:5) and of Jesus (Rom. 3:25). The third Greek word translated propitiation is the Greek hilaskomai, which means “to propitiate,” “to satisfy,” or “to expiate.”

Names of God’s Saving Acts
Atonement: From the Hebrew kaphar, which literally means “to cover,” but also carries the broader meaning of “expiation,” or “condoining,” “wiping away,” “placating,” or “cancelling.” The Greek term is hiloskomai, meaning “to propitiate,” “to expiate,” or “to conciliate.”

Names of God’s Saving Acts
Sacrificial (Substituationary) Atonement: The Bible indicates that Christ died in our place, punished for our sins that we might be set free. Arguments in favor of substitutionary atonement: First, God’s justice demands it. Second, our total depravity demands it. Third, the OT sacrifices imply it. Fourth, Isaiah 53:5-6 speak about it.

Names of God’s Saving Acts
Arguments in favor of substitutionary atonement: Fifth, Jesus was presented as the Passover Lamb, which was substitutionary in nature. Sixth, Jesus claimed to be a fulfillment of Isaiah 53. Seventh, Jesus presented His death as a ransom, which usually meant, in the Greek OT, a deliverance from bondage in exchange for the payment of compensation for offering a substitute.

Names of God’s Saving Acts
Arguments in favor of substitutionary atonement: Eighth, Christ presented Himself as a consecrated priest and sacrifice. Ninth, Christ’s death was “for,” that is, on another’s behalf. Tenth, In Christ’s death “for” (Gk. anti, meaning “instead of) us, substitution is explicit (Mk. 10:45; Matt. 20:28).

Names of God’s Saving Acts
Arguments in favor of substitutionary atonement: Eleven, “Expiation” is used of Christ’s death, this implies a substitution. Twelfth, Appeasing God’s wrath by Christ’s death implies a substitutionary death (Rom. 2:25).

Three Stages of Salvation
First, is justification, an instantaneous, past act of God by which one is saved from the guilt of sin—his record is cleared and he is guiltless before the Judge (Rom. 8:1). Second, is sanctification, which refers to salvation from the power of sin. In Calvinist teaching this grace is instantaneous at salvation, but is also progressive as one matures and is made righteous before God.

Three Stages of Salvation
Second, is sanctification, (cont.) which refers to salvation from the power of sin. In Wesleyan Theology sanctification is a second definite act of grace. It may occur at salvation, or it may occur later as one is “sanctified.” In some views it is complete at the moment the second definite act of grace is applied in response to faith, in others it is progressive.

Three Stages of Salvation
Sanctification: There are three areas of victory over the power of sin: 1.) Victory over the world (1 John 5:4); 2.) Victory over the flesh (Rom. 7:24-25); 3.) Victory over the devil (James 4:7). Third Stage, is glorification. This is the future act that will save us from the very presence of sin.

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Be Sure to Read Chapter 10
• Pay close attention to the Catholic position and Martin Luther's response. • Be familiar with the chart on pp. 287-288 of Geisler, Vol. 3. Before reading the next PowerPoint presentation for chapter eleven, be sure to read the attachment from the book of French Arrington, “Refuting Eternal Security.” The next PowerPoint will summarize this article.