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Foods that Heal

Chronic Pain &


the Inflammation
Process
Chronic pain and
Inflammation
Chronic pain &
Inflammation
Chronic pain
Previously chronic pain not that well understood.
The medical profession - is always a manifestation
of an underlying injury or disease.
Believed that the amount of pain correlated highly
(almost one-to-one) with the amount of tissue
damage or injury. As such, doctors focused on
treating the underlying cause with the belief that
once the injury or disease was cured, the pain
would then disappear.
If no underlying cause could be found, then the
patient was told that very few treatments are
available, or worse, “The pain is in your head.”
Chronic pain &
Inflammation

The medical community is
starting to understand that if
pain is no longer a function of a
healthy nervous system (signaling
that there is a disease or
underlying injury), then the pain
itself becomes the problem and
needs to be treated as the primary
pathology.

Chronic pain &
Inflammation

To successfully treat a chronic
pain patient, one must accept that
all pain is real. This may seem like
an obvious statement, but people
with chronic pain are often
treated as if their pain is either
imaginary or exaggerated.
Chronic pain &
Inflammation
Chronic pain &
Inflammation
Chronic pain &
Inflammation
Chronic pain &
Inflammation
 Inflammatory disorders
 Abnormalities associated with inflammation comprise a large,
officially unrelated group of disorders which underlie a vast
variety of human diseases. The immune system is often
involved with inflammatory disorders, demonstrated in
both allergic reactions and some myopathies, with many
immune system disorders resulting in abnormal
inflammation. Non-immune diseases with etiological origins
in inflammatory processes are thought to include cancer,
atherosclerosis, and ischaemic heart disease.[4]
 A large variety of proteins are involved in inflammation, and
any one of them is open to a genetic mutation which
impairs or otherwise dysregulates the normal function and
expression of that protein.
 Examples of disorders associated with inflammation include:
 Cotran; Kumar, Collins (1998). Robbins Pathologic Basis of Disease.
[4] abcdefghijklmnopgrs
Philadelphia: W.B Saunders Company. ISBN 0-7216-7335-X

Disorders Associated with
Inflammation
 Asthma
 Autoimmune disease
 Chronic inflammation
 Chronic prostatitis
 Glomerulonephritis
 Hypersensitivities
 Inflammatory bowel diseases
 Pelvic inflammatory disease
 Reperfusion injury
 Rheumatoid arthritis
 Transplant rejection
 Vacuities

[4]
Cotran; Kumar, Collins (1998). Robbins Pathologic Basis of Disease.
abcdefghijklmnopgrs
Philadelphia: W.B Saunders Company. ISBN 0-7216-7335-X

Alergies
 An allergic reaction, formally known as type 1 hypersensitivity, is the
result of an inappropriate immune response triggering
inflammation. A common example is hay fever, which is caused by
a hypersensitive response by skin mast cells to allergens. Pre-
sensitised mast cells respond by degranulating, releasing
vasoactive chemicals such as histamine. These chemicals
propagate an excessive inflammatory response characterized by
blood vessel dilation, production of pro-inflammatory molecules,
cytokine release, and recruitment of leukocytes.[4] Severe
inflammatory response may mature into a systemic response
known as anaphylaxis.
 Other hypersensitivity reactions (type 2 and type 3) are mediated by
antibody reactions and induce inflammation by attracting
leukocytes which damage surrounding tissue.

 Cotran; Kumar, Collins (1998). Robbins Pathologic Basis of Disease.
[4] abcdefghijklmnopgrs
Philadelphia: W.B Saunders Company. ISBN 0-7216-7335-X

Myopathies
Inflammatory myopathies are caused by the
immune system inappropriately attacking
components of muscle, leading to signs of
muscle inflammation. They may occur in
conjunction with other immune disorders,
such as
systemic sclerosis, and include
dermatomyositis,
polymyositis, and
inclusion body myositis.[4]