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TILA Teacher Training

Potential Risks and Potential Solutions

2013 TILA

Ethical and Privacy Issues


Sabela Melchor Couto (University of Roehampton, London)

Young People and the Internet


TOP MYTHS
1. Digital natives know it all

2. Everyone is creating their own content now.


3. Under 13s cant use social networking sites,
so no worries.
4. Everyone is watching porn online.
5. Bullies are baddies.

6. People you meet on the Internet are


strangers.
7. Offline risks migrate online.

8. Putting the PC in the living room will help.

9. Teaching digital skills will reduce online risks.


10. Children can get around safety software.

(Kids Online)
2013 TILA

Ethical and Privacy Issues

Risks Online

Content risks: those that involve the child as a recipient. They


include mass-produced images or texts among others.
Contact risks: those in which the child is a participant in activities
initiated by adults.
Conduct risks: those in which the child is an actor in a peer-topeer context.
(Livingstone et al., 2013:20)

Risk doesnt always mean harm. There is a range of potential risk,


but they do not necessarily result in harm.
(Haddon and
Livingstone, 2012:2)

It is important to support childrens capacity to cope themselves,


thereby building resilience for digital citizens.

2013 TILA

Ethical and Privacy Issues

Risks Online (Kids Online)

Aggressive

Sexual

Values

Commercial
2013 TILA

Content

Contact

Conduct

(Child as receiver)

(Child as participant)

(Child as actor)

Violent/gory
content

Harrassment,
stalking

Bullying, hostile
peer activity

Pornographic
content

Grooming, sexual
abuse on meeting
strangers

Sexual
harassmanet,
sexting

Ideological
persuasion

Potentially
harmful usergenerated
content

Racist/hateful
content
Embedded
marketing

Personal date
misuse

Ethical and Privacy Issues

Gambling,
copyright
infringement
4

Did this bother you? (Kids Online)

Aggressive

Content

Contact

Conduct

(Child as receiver)

(Child as participant)

(Child as actor)

Violent/gory
content

Harrassment, stalking

Bullying, hostile
peer activity

4 in 5
Sexual

Pornographic
content

1 in 3

Values

Commercial
2013 TILA

Racist/hateful
content
Embedded
marketing

Grooming, sexual
abuse on meeting
strangers

Sexual
harassmanet,
sexting

1 in 9

1 in 4

Ideological persuasion

Potentially harmful
user-generated
content

Personal date misuse

Gambling,
copyright
infringement

Ethical and Privacy Issues

Harm
Content

14% has seen sexual images online, 4% were upset by it.


(Hasebringk et al., 2011:10)
Contact

30% had contact online with someone they had not met face to
face, only 9% in all had gone to a face to face meeting (Livingstone
et al., 2013:12)

Conduct

6% of the 9-16-year-olds who use the Internet say that they have
been bullied online; 3% admit that they have bullied others.
(Hasebringk et al., 2011:9)

15% of the children surveyed received a sexual message and 4%


were upset by it. (Hasebringk et al., 2011:10)

2013 TILA

Ethical and Privacy Issues

What can we do about it?


Types of mediation:

Active mediation: talking with children about particular media


activities or sharing these activities with them.

Restrictive mediation: setting up rules about what children can or


cannot do.

Monitoring: checking the computer to see what children have


been doing, checking childrens profiles on a social networking site
or the messages in their email or instant messaging account.

Technical mediation: using specific software built to filter and


restrict certain types of unwanted use.
(Hasebringk et al., 2011:11)

2013 TILA

Ethical and Privacy Issues

What do we do about it?

Teachers mostly practise restrictive mediation. On average, 62%


of the children say that their teachers set rules for using the Internet
at school.

One in five children who use the Internet report that their teachers
have not engaged with them in any of these ways at all.

Three-quarters (73%) of children say their peers have helped or


supported their internet use in at least one of the five ways asked
about.
(Hasebringk et al., 2011:12)

2013 TILA

Ethical and Privacy Issues

Our role as
educators

Kids Online
2013 TILA

Raising Awareness

Source: www.saferinternet.org

2013 TILA

Ethical and Privacy Issues


Sabela Melchor Couto (University of Roehampton, London)

Bibliography

Haddon, L. and S. Livingstone (2012) EU Kids Online: national


perspectives. EU Kids Online, The London School of Economics and
Political Science, London, UK. This version available at:
http://www2.lse.ac.uk/media@lse/research/EUKidsOnline/EU%20Kids%
20III/Reports/PerspectivesReport.pdf

Hasebrink et al. (2011) Patterns of risk and safety online. In-depth


analyses from the EU Kids Online survey of 9-16 year olds and their
parents in 25 countries. LSE, London: EU Kids Online.
http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/39356/1/Patterns_of_risk_and_safety_online_%2
8LSERO%29.pdf

Livingstone et al. (2013) In their own words: What bothers children


online?
http://www2.lse.ac.uk/media@lse/research/EUKidsOnline/EU%20Kids%
20III/Reports/Intheirownwords020213.pdf

Livingstone et al. (2011c) Social networking, age and privacy. EU Kids


Online, London, UK.This version available at:
http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/35849

Livingstone
2013 TILA

et al. (2011a) EU kids online: final report. EU Kids Online, London


School of Economics & Political Science, London, UK.

Bibliography

Livingstone, S. et al. (2011b) Risks and safety on the internet: the


perspective of European children: full findings and policy implications
from the EU Kids Online survey of 9-16 year olds and their parents in
25 countries. EU Kids Online, Deliverable D4. EU Kids Online Network,
London, UK. This version available at: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/33731/

2013 TILA