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Health Priorities in

Australia
Vlad Iltiakov
Mrs Renwick
Baulkham Hills High School

Article 1: Life Expectancy for males


surges past 80 for the first time

November 6, 2014

Eryk Bagshaw

The Sydney Morning Herald

Article 1: Life Expectancy for males


surges past 80 for the first time

Summary:

For people, such as Nick Iliopolous, living past 80 can be expected. Latest information from the
Australian Bureau of Statistics suggest that Australian men can expect to live past 80. The average life
expectancy for males has passed the 80 year barrier, allowing Australia to join countries including
Switzerland, Iceland and Japan where the average life expectancy for both males and females is over 80.
Nick Iliopolous is interviewed, asked about his secrets for his good health in which he responds, The
secret is salad. Only tomatoes and lettuce. Walk for one hour a day and then back to the beach. His
other secret to longevity is having a wife.
Women have passed the 80 barrier nearly a quarter of a decade ago in 1990, but since then, their life
expectancy has only risen to 84.3. Dr Denise Carlton, Director of Demography for ABS states, "It's worth
considering that 80 years is an expectation from birth. Statistically, the older you get, the more likely it
is that you'll live to an even older age.
But another thing to keep in mind is that better life expectancy does not necessarily mean better quality
of life, according to Dr Zaria Hossain of USYD, An ageing population needs to have adequate services.

Article 1: Life Expectancy for males


surges past 80 for the first time

Relevant Area of the HSC PDHPE Core 1 Syllabus

A student develops knowledge and understanding of the factors that affect


health
H2- A student: Analyses and explains the health status of Australians in terms of
current trends and groups most at risk.
- Life Expectancy-

Article 1: Life Expectancy for males


surges past 80 for the first time
This article relates to the syllabus as it focuses on the ageing population and the
fact that male life expectancy has risen to over 80 years. It gives a range of
outlooks on the matter, firstly from someone who has passed it himself and his
feelings towards it.
It also shows the outlook of professionals such as Dr Denise Carlton and Dr Zaria
Hossain, both of which contribute their experts analysis of the topic. Dr Denise
Carlton also offers a comparison of the male trends and the female trend,
showing the differences in life expectancy. Dr Hossain, in comparison heeds
warning that this shouldnt all be optimistic as there are still issues about it that
must be addressed, suggesting that an ageing population requires more effort to
sustain as well as the possibilities of impacts it bares on the working
environment.

Article 2: Who will stand up for private


health insurance patients

November 12, 2014

Canberra Times

Hosted on WA today

Article 2: Who will stand up for private


health insurance patients

Summary

Cavalry Health Care, the overlooker of two private hospitals in Canberra has terminated
its contract with 25 private health insurance funds earlier in the month, leaving over two
million customers to pay out of pocket expenses of around $500. The reason for this is
the jeopardised long-term sustainability of these hospitals because of the low-rates paid
over recent years by insurers.
This is not the first time private health funds have had disputes with hospitals. Recently,
Medibank Private and Ramsay Health Care had a dispute on prices for patients staying
overnight in the hospital, having costs that could affect the wellbeing of patients.
Much of the revenue that is generated by health insurers and private hospitals come from
places that encourage the addition of private health cover to people payment areas.
Although Australia used to have an impressive ranking in terms of residents health, this
has dropped due to cost problems.

Article 2: Who will stand up for private


health insurance patients

Relevant Area of the PDHPE Core 1 Syllabus.

A student develops knowledge and understanding of the factors that affect


health
H5- A student explains the different roles and responsibilities of individuals,
communities and governments in addressing Australias health priorities
- Private Health Insurance -

Article 2: Who will stand up for private


health insurance patients
This article relates to the syllabus as it shows the issues that occur with private
health insurance. Although private health insurance has numerous benefits such
as less waiting times for operations, better facilities and access to more health
services for patients, the drawbacks, in Australia, are the costs required to
maintain it. As stated, this article reveals that large companies and hospitals do
not necessarily have a worked out agreement, with disputes addressing costs
frequently occurring. It also states sources of such funding, giving the reader
insight on the nature of such funds. The issues that are shown, link to the
previous article, as ageing populations increase costs and escalate PHC and MBS
fees.

Article 3: Social Determinants of


Health

Date Cannot be Determined, but since it refers to an article release in


October 2014, the article was published between October and December
2014.
National Rural Health Alliance Inc.
www.ruralhealth.org.au

Article 3: Social Determinants of


Health

Summary:

The World Health Organisation, WHO, defines the social determinants of health as the
conditions of which people are born, grow, live, work and age.
Health Inequities are mostly caused by social determinants. Citizens such as Australian
country people may experience the same circumstances as city people, being exposed
to approximately the same determinants but in comparison to rural, the results are
vastly different.
As addressed by NRHA, income inequality for Rural and Remote areas has increased
over the past few years. Rural and Remote areas are constantly suffering these
disadvantages, having less access to common communications, education and rising
negative trends such as increase smoking in communities.
The Alliance has produced a submission proposing a higher education reform. Frequent
submissions from other organisations show the attempts to address this growing issue.

Article 3: Social Determinants of


Health

Relevant Area of the PDHPE Core 1 Syllabus.

A student develops knowledge and understanding of the factors that affect


health
H5- A student explains the different roles and responsibilities of individuals,
communities and governments in addressing Australias health priorities
- Health Inequities, Rural and Remote Areas -

Article 3: Social Determinants of


Health

This article relates to the syllabus as it directly addresses various areas that
are to be covered in the syllabus, even defining Social Determinants of
Health. The information given in this article can be used to answer multiple
questions that can be asked about the Core 1 topic of the HSC syllabus. It
shows the recent actions of its organisation to the address of the issue of
health inequities in Rural and Remote areas, stating and linking trends that
help illustrate the ongoing circumstances. It links to various outcomes
involved in the Syllabus, including the need to be able to explain roles of
various organisations, such as itself, the National Rural Health Alliance.