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Turrel
David
The tundra biome contains a variety of
vegetation, long cold winter seasons
and short cool summer seasons. In the
tundra region there are seals, polar
bears, musk ox's, caribous, snow geese
and Canadian geese. The average
temperature in the tundra region is
colder than 23 degrees Fahrenheit. In
order to survive in the tundra biome,
musk ox’s and polar bears have thick
fur for insulation.
The taiga biome contains dense
coniferous forests that are separated
by bodies of water, low light, and
very cold winters. In the taiga region,
there are woodland caribou, rabbits,
brown bears, beaver, lynx and
wolves. The conifer tree is taiga’s
most dominant and well adapted
tree. The conifer tree has branches
that hang downward in order to
prevent snow build up with a pointy
shape and flexible trunk to handle
The Deciduous Forest exists in dry or
moist climates and the average
temperature is approximately 50
degrees Fahrenheit. The biome is
dominated by deciduous trees and
contains squirrels, raccoons, deer
and black bears. The squirrels and
raccoons have adapted to the
conditions of the deciduous forest by
The grassland biome consists of plants
and grasses. Grasslands vary in
climate and the winters are dry while
the summers are short and wet. The
average temperature during summer
is 80 degrees Fahrenheit. Grasslands
get about 10 to 30 inches of rain per
year. Grasshoppers, caterpillars,
ostriches, owls, giraffes, zebras and
termites live in grasslands. The giraffe
adapted to the height of the grassland
trees. They have long necks that allow
The chaparral biome exists in warm
temperatures and is dominated by
shrubs and heavy vegetation. Coyotes,
jackrabbits, alligators, lizards and
horned toads live in the chaparral.
Jackrabbits have adapted by, cooling
themselves by sending a lot of blood to
there ears in order to release heat from
there bodies.
The Savanna has scattered trees and
approximately 50 to 130 centimeters of
rainfall per year. The average
temperature in the savanna is 70
degrees Fahrenheit. There are lions,
elephants, wild dogs, koala bears and
zebras in the savanna. The elephant
has adapted to the savanna by using
there long trunks to pick up and carry
food.
The desert is very hot with little rainfall. It
receives about 10 inches of rainfall per
year. There are armadillos, coyotes,
camels, foxes, wild horses and gophers.
The gophers have adapted to the desert’s
living conditions by using their forelegs,
elongated claws and their teeth for
digging holes.
The tropical rainforest consists of a warm
climate and gets an average of 50 to 260
inches of rainfall per year. There are
monkeys, sloths, parrots, toucans, snakes,
lizards and toads. The Sloths have adapted
to the rainforest by moving slowly in order
to become harder to see and they are
covered with a greenish layer of algae
which camouflages their fur.
The Abyssal Zone is a sediment-
covered part of the deep ocean floor
that exists at depths greater than
6,500 ft below sea level. Abyssal
plains do not support abundant
aquatic life and no adaptations can
be cited.
The Coral reefs exist in warm, shallow,
tropical marine waters that have enough
light to all the reefs to grow. The water
temperature is between74-78°F and has high
levels of oxygen. In the coral reefs there are
sea worms, sponges, shrimp, crabs, jellyfish,
oysters, sea anemones and turtles. Sponges
inhabit corals for the purpose of protection
from predators and Sea worms use the corals
for food.
The wetlands either contain freshwater
or saltwater and has waterlogged soil.
There are beavers, birds, snakes,
fishes, turtles, raccoons, alligators and
shellfish. Beavers are well adapted to
the conditions of the wetlands. They
have webbed feet and a flat tail for
swimming.
Lakes are bodies of freshwater that
contain living organisms at low salinity
levels. Temperatures that are between
50 and 75 degrees Fahrenheit support
the lives of fishes. There are bullfrogs,
fishes, birds, pelicans, platypus and
lizards. The platypus’ legs are short
and powerful, there feet are webbed
and there large claws are useful for
burrowing.
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2006. Science Resource Center. Gale. 03 July 2009
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 "Taiga." U*X*L Complete Life Science Resource. Ed. Leonard C. Bruno and Julie
Carnagie. Detroit: U*X*L, 2001. Science Resource Center. Gale. 03 July 2009
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Carnagie. Detroit: U*X*L, 2001. Science Resource Center. Gale. 03 July 2009
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