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Antisemitism

in Europe
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Antisemitism in Europe

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Antisemitism in Europe

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Antisemitism in Europe

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Antisemitism in Europe

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Antisemitism in Europe

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Antisemitism in Europe

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Antisemitism in Europe

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Antisemitism in Europe

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Antisemitism in Europe

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World Values Survey


data: % of people
rejecting to have
a Jewish neighbour

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Anti-Semitism

WVS
28 bis
23,2 bis
20,8 bis
18,2 bis
14,8 bis
11,2 bis
9,1 bis
6,4 bis
4,4 bis
1,6 bis

83,4
28
23,2
20,8
18,2
14,8
11,2
9,1
6,4
4,4

(5)
(4)
(3)
(6)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)
Explanatory note: bis is shorthand for ranging from to; countries with
missing values are marked in green color.

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Anti-Semitism

WVS
28 bis
23,2 bis
20,8 bis
18,2 bis
14,8 bis
11,2 bis
9,1 bis
6,4 bis
4,4 bis
1,6 bis

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83,4
28
23,2
20,8
18,2
14,8
11,2
9,1
6,4
4,4

(5)
(4)
(3)
(6)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(5)

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Global Antisemitism, latest data, World Values Survey

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Global racism, latest data, World Values


Survey

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16% of
Israeli
Muslim
citizens
supported
Osama Ben
Laden;
in Turkey
support
among
Muslims
for
Osama Ben
Laden was
5%

Muslim population share


per total population

% Muslim Confidence in Osama


Ben Laden (PEW International,
data for 2007 or nearest year)

Lebanon

70

Turkey

99

Tanzania

35

11

Kuwait

85

13

Cte d'Ivoire

38,6

16

Israel

14,6

16

Egypt

91

18

Jordan

95

20

Morocco

98,7

20

Senegal

94

20

Mali

90

30

Malaysia

60,4

32

Ethiopia

47,5

37

Pakistan

96,35

38

88

39

88,22

41

Bangladesh
Indonesia

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Nigeria

Antisemitism in Europe

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21

52

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Eugene
Delacroix
Fanatiques
de Tanger

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Eugne
Delacroix
La Noce
juive au
Maroc

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Gabriel A. Almond (January 12, 1911


December 25, 2002)

Participatory democratic institutions relate to the manner


in which people within a polity view their relationships
with others vis a vis their own interests. The civic culture
is pluralistic, and based on communication and
persuasion, a culture of consensus and diversity, a
culture that [permits] change but [moderates] it. This
civic culture is but one example of political culture
generally, which they take to refer to the specifically
political orientations -- attitudes towards the political
system and its various parts, and attitudes toward the
role of the self in the system. Moreover, in its position of
general values and attitudes shared by the populace,
political culture is formulated as the connecting link
between micro- and macropolitics.
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25
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There are three broad types of political culture:


1) parochial, in which no clear differentiation of specific
political roles and expectations exists among actors, i.e.
political specialization is minimal
2) subject, in which institutional and role differentiation
exists in political life, but towards which the citizen stands in
largely passive relations; and
3) participant, in which the relationships between
specialized institutions and citizen opinion and activity is
interactive.
A participant is assumed to be aware of and informed about
the political system in both its governmental and political
aspects. A subject tends to be cognitively oriented primarily
ofgovernment:
these more traditional
attitudes and
toThe
themaintenance
output side of
the executive,
their fusion with
participant
orientations
lead
to a
bureaucracy,
and the
judiciary.
The parochial
tends
to be
balancedor
political
culture
in which
political
activity,
unaware,
only dimly
aware,
of the
political
system in all
involvement,
and rationality exist but are balanced by
its
aspects.
passivity, traditionality, and commitment to parochial values.

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By country of origin of
the rejecting person

Rejected Neighbours
Immigrants/foreig
People of a
n workers
different race

Homosexuals

People of a
different
religion

average

Turkey
Moldova
France
Russian Federation
Serbia
Romania
Bulgaria
Cyprus
Ukraine

31%
19%
43%
33%
26%
19%
19%
23%
19%

30%
24%
27%
17%
19%
20%
21%
17%
12%

89%
71%
34%
68%
73%
68%
53%
50%
60%

34%
26%
30%
16%
15%
17%
16%
17%
13%

46%
35%
34%
33%
33%
31%
27%
27%
26%

Slovenia
Poland
Total
Italy
Finland
Germany
Great Britain
Spain
Switzerland
Netherlands
Norway
Andorra
Sweden

21%
15%
19%
16%
17%
16%
16%
8%
8%
10%
8%
3%
2%

18%
14%
15%
13%
12%
9%
5%
9%
6%
9%
4%
4%
2%

42%
56%
41%
25%
24%
17%
19%
9%
12%
5%
8%
7%
4%

16%
12%
13%
12%
10%
5%
2%
7%
5%
3%
3%
3%
2%

24%
24%
22%
17%
16%
12%
11%
8%
8%
7%
6%
4%
3%

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Andorra [2005], Bulgaria [2006], Cyprus [2006], Finland [2005],


France [2006], Germany [2006], Great Britain [2006], Italy [2005],
Moldova [2006], Netherlands [2006], Norway [2007], Poland
[2005], Romania [2005], Russian Federation [2006], Serbia
[2006], Slovenia [2005], Spain [2007], Sweden [2006],
Switzerland [2007], Turkey [2007], Ukraine [2006]

Rejection Rejection of Rejection of


of
By denomination of the Homosex Immigrants/
rejecting person
uals
foreign
workers

Rejection of

Rejection of

Rejection of

People of a
different
race

People of a
different
religion

People who
speak a
different
language

average
xenophobia/ho
mophobia rate

The Church of Sweden

4%

1%

1%

1%

1%

2%

Protestant

18%

10%

7%

5%

6%

9%

Evangelical

21%

16%

10%

8%

9%

13%

Roman Catholic

30%

15%

14%

11%

9%

16%

Total

35%

15%

12%

11%

9%

16%

Orthodox

64%

23%

20%

18%

13%

28%

Muslim

80%

27%

26%

28%

21%

36%

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Selected countries/samples: Albania [2002], Austria [1999], Belarus [2000], Belgium [1999],
Bosnia and Herzegovina [2001], Bulgaria [1999], Croatia [1999], Czech Republic [1999],
Denmark [1999], Estonia [1999], Finland [2000], France [1999], Germany East [1999], Germany
West [1999], Great Britain [1999], Greece [1999], Hungary [1999], Iceland [1999], Ireland [1999],
Italy [1999], Latvia [1999], Lithuania [1999], Luxembourg [1999], Macedonia [2001], Malta
[1999], Moldova [2002], Montenegro [2001], Netherlands [1999], Northern Ireland [1999],
Poland [1999], Portugal [1999], Romania [1999], Russian Federation [1999], Serbia [2001],
Slovakia [1999], Slovenia [1999], Spain [1999], Spain [2000], Sweden [1999], Turkey [2001],
Turkey [2001], Ukraine [1999]

By denomination of
the rejecting person

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Rejected Neighbours: Jews


Not mentioned
Mentioned

Total

Protestant
Free church/Non
denominational
church

94,20%
93,80%

5,80%
6,20%

5547 (100%)
661 (100%)

Roman Catholic
Total
Orthodox
Muslim

85,30%
84,40%
81,80%
62,20%

14,70%
15,60%
18,20%
37,80%

16760 (100%)
33448 (100%)
7044 (100%)
2812 (100%)

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foreign born population

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NY Times,
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/24/opinion/how-to-integrate-europes-mus
lims.html?_r=0
European countries could use a period of benign neglect of the Islam issue but
only after they finish incorporating religion into the national fabric. For too long,
they have instead masked an absence of coherent integration policy under the
cloak of multiculturalism. The state outsourced the hard work of integration to
foreign diplomats and Islamist institutions for example, some students in
Germany read Saudi-supplied textbooks in Saudi-run institutions.
This neglect of integration helped an unregulated underground Islam to take
hold in storefronts, basements and courtyards. It reflected wishful thinking about
how long guest workers would stay and perpetuated a myth of eventual departure
and repatriation.
In Britain, for example, race-based equality laws protected Sikhs and Jews as
minorities, but not Hindus and Muslims, since they were still considered
foreign.
Institutional exclusion fueled a demand for religious recognition, and did much to
unite and segregate Muslims. Islamist organizations became the most visible
defenders of the faith. It is crucial now to provide the right mix of institutional
incentives for religious and political moderation, and the most promising strategy
for doing that is for governments to consult with the full range of law-abiding
religious institutions that Muslims have themselves established.

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Muslim integration into Western societies has become of


increasing importance to policymakers and researchers since 9/11.
The idea that exclusion of Muslim communities from mainstream
society threatens international security has gained particular
currency in Europe as a result of attacks in Amsterdam, Madrid,
and London and riots in Paris. That most of those involved in these
terrorist incidents were European citizens of Asian or African
descent brought many to question integration and immigration
policies and the extent to which these policies can foil a future
homegrown attack.
Terrorism in Europe has prompted several researchers to examine
Muslim integration in the West (Haddad and Smith 2002; Malik
2004a; Angenendt et al. 2007; Sinno 2009). Yet these studies tend to
concentrate on integration within individual countries rather than in
cross-national comparison. A notable exception is Cesari (2004),
but her study underscores the transformation and reconciliation of
Islam in the West, rather than the extent to which Muslims are
included into Western societies.
Brandon Boylan
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Muslim poverty in Europe data from


the European Social Survey

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The potential of violence


of the Islamist ideology London bombings

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The potential of violence


of the Islamist ideology Madrid bombings

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and the Arab Barometer data


about Arab acceptancy of terrorism

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The victims of Toulouse

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The Islamist murderer

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04/07/2009
'Erdogan Has Gambled Away Political Capital'
US President Barack Obama said he would like
Turkey to become a member of the European
Union.

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Muslim population share


per total population

% Muslim Support for Suicide


Bombing (PEW International, data
for 2007 or nearest year)

14,6

Uzbekistan

89

Egypt

91

Germany

3,7

Pakistan

96,35

Indonesia

88,22

10

Morocco

98,7

11

Tanzania

35

11

France

7,5

16

Spain

2,5

16

Turkey

99

16

United Kingdom

2,7

16

Ethiopia

47,5

18

Senegal

94

18

Bangladesh

88

20

Kuwait

85

21

Jordan

95

23

Malaysia

60,4

26

Cte d'Ivoire

38,6

30

Uganda

15

30

Lebanon

70

34

Mali

90

39

Nigeria
Antisemitism
in Europe

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Israel

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49

42

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Zionism has spread like a virus to


humanity (IHH President Bulent
Yildrim) (
http://www.jpost.com/International/A
rticle.aspx?id=215573
Antisemitism in Europe)
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In fact, Turkey is turning away from the


West. Its position diverges from that of
the West on Hamas, but also on other
important issues. Ankara hosted
Sudanese President Omar Hassan alBashir, accused of war crimes, despite
the protest of the European states.
Turkey is the only member of NATO to
have hosted Iranian President,
Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. Efraim Inbar
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http://www.todayszaman.com/newsDetail_getNewsById.action?load=detay&newsId=228386

Erdoan receives Gaddafi human rights award


01 December 2010, Wednesday / BRAHIM VARLIK, TRIPOLI
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Gaddafis
victims

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Erdogans mentor
Erbakans funeral:
Erbakan said: For 5700
Years Jews ruled over the
world. Its a reign of
lawlessness, cruelty and
violence
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Erdogan cancels EU meeting due to Erbakan's funeral

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Recent Arab
Editions of
the
Protocols
of the Elders
of Zion

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?!
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