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Transport Layer

Our goals:
 understand principles
behind transport
layer services:



multiplexing/demultipl
exing
reliable data transfer
flow control
congestion control

 learn about transport

layer protocols in the
Internet:

UDP: connectionless
transport
TCP: connection-oriented
transport
TCP congestion control

Transport Layer 3-1

Outline  Transport-layer services  Multiplexing and demultiplexing  Connectionless transport: UDP Transport Layer 3-2 .

passes to network layer  rcv side: reassembles segments into messages.Transport services and protocols application transport network data link physical network data link physical network data link physical g lo e al ic nd -e nd network data link physical a tr network data link physical network data link physical rt po ns logical communication between app processes running on different hosts  transport protocols run in end systems  send side: breaks app messages into segments. passes to app layer  more than one transport protocol available to apps  Internet: TCP and UDP  provide application transport network data link physical Transport Layer 3-3 .

network layer network layer: logical communication between hosts  transport layer: logical communication between processes   relies on.Transport vs. network layer services Household analogy: 12 kids sending letters to 12 kids  processes = kids  app messages = letters in envelopes  hosts = houses  transport protocol = parents  network-layer protocol = postal service Transport Layer 3-4 . enhances.

in-order delivery (TCP)  no-frills extension of “best-effort” IP  services not available:  delay guarantees  bandwidth guarantees network data link physical network data link physical rt po ns delivery: UDP network data link physical a tr  unreliable. unordered nd -e nd  network data link physical e al ic  congestion control flow control connection setup network data link physical g lo  application transport network data link physical application transport network data link physical Transport Layer 3-5 .Internet transport-layer protocols  reliable.

outline  Transport-layer services  Multiplexing and demultiplexing  Connectionless transport: UDP Transport Layer 3-6 .

Multiplexing/demultiplexing Multiplexing at send host: gathering data from multiple sockets. enveloping data with header (later used for demultiplexing) Demultiplexing at rcv host: delivering received segments to correct socket = socket application transport network link = process P3 P1 P1 application transport network P2 P4 application transport network link link physical host 1 physical host 2 physical host 3 Transport Layer 3-7 .

destination IP address  each datagram carries 1 transportlayer segment  each segment has source. destination port number (recall: well-known port numbers for specific applications)  host uses IP addresses & port numbers to direct segment to appropriate socket  32 bits source port # dest port # other header fields application data (message) TCP/UDP segment format Transport Layer 3-8 .How demultiplexing works  host receives IP datagrams each datagram has source IP address.

Connectionless demultiplexing  Create sockets with port numbers: DatagramSocket mySocket1 = new DatagramSocket(99111).  UDP socket identified by two-tuple: (dest IP address. dest port number)  When host receives UDP segment:   checks destination port number in segment directs UDP segment to socket with that port number  IP datagrams with different source IP addresses and/or source port numbers directed to same socket Transport Layer 3-9 . DatagramSocket mySocket2 = new DatagramSocket(99222).

Connectionless demux (cont) DatagramSocket serverSocket = new DatagramSocket(6428). P2 SP: 6428 DP: 9157 client IP: A P1 P1 P3 SP: 9157 DP: 6428 SP: 6428 DP: 5775 server IP: C SP: 5775 DP: 6428 Client IP:B SP provides “return address” Transport Layer 3- .

Connection-oriented demux  TCP socket identified by 4-tuple:     source IP address source port number dest IP address dest port number  recv host uses all four values to direct segment to appropriate socket  Server host may support many simultaneous TCP sockets:  each socket identified by its own 4-tuple  Web servers have different sockets for each connecting client  non-persistent HTTP will have different socket for each request Transport Layer 3- .

Connection-oriented demux (cont) P1 P4 P5 P2 P6 P1P3 SP: 5775 DP: 80 S-IP: B D-IP:C client IP: A SP: 9157 DP: 80 S-IP: A D-IP:C server IP: C SP: 9157 DP: 80 S-IP: B D-IP:C Client IP:B Transport Layer 3- .

Outline  Transport-layer services  Multiplexing and demultiplexing  Connectionless transport: UDP Transport Layer 3- .

UDP: User Datagram Protocol  “no frills.” “bare bones” Internet transport protocol  “best effort” service. receiver  each UDP segment handled independently of others [RFC 768] Why is there a UDP?  no connection establishment (which can add delay)  simple: no connection state at sender. receiver  small segment header  no congestion control: UDP can blast away as fast as desired Transport Layer 3- . UDP segments may be:  lost  delivered out of order to app  connectionless:  no handshaking between UDP sender.

in bytes of UDP segment.UDP: more  often used for streaming multimedia apps  loss tolerant  rate sensitive Length. including header  other UDP uses  DNS  SNMP  reliable transfer over UDP: add reliability at application layer  application-specific error recovery! 32 bits source port # dest port # length checksum Application data (message) UDP segment format Transport Layer 3- .

. flipped bits) in transmitted segment Sender:  treat segment contents as sequence of 16-bit integers  checksum: addition (1’s complement sum) of segment contents  sender puts checksum value into UDP checksum field Receiver:  compute checksum of received segment  check if computed checksum equals checksum field value:  NO .error detected  YES . Transport Layer 3- . But maybe errors nonetheless? More later ….UDP checksum Goal: detect “errors” (e.no error detected.g.

a carryout from the most significant bit needs to be added to the result  Example: add two 16-bit integers 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 wraparound 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 sum 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 checksum 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 Transport Layer 3- .Internet Checksum Example  Note  When adding numbers.