You are on page 1of 19

HANDLING AND USING

FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS
&
BONDING &
GROUNDING
OF FLAMMABLE

HANDLING AND USING


FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS

Flammable Liquids

Flashpoint is the minimum temperature at


which a liquid gives off a sufficient
concentration to form an ignitable mixture
with air near the surface of the liquid.
As an example, gasoline has a flashpoint of55 degrees Fahrenheit.
Flashpoint

HANDLING AND USING


FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS
If the gasoline is below -55 degrees, it will
not ignite.
Flashpoint is a useful measurement when
storing, handling, or using the liquid in
different temperatures and situations.
The flashpoint tells the potential for ignition
at a certain temperature.

HANDLING AND USING


FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS
Flammable liquids in gases have a minimum
concentration of vapor gas below, which
circulation of the flame does not occur on
contact with an ignition source.
This minimum concentration of gas and
air is known as LFL Lower Flammable Limit.
The maximum portion of vapor or gas in air
above which circulation of flame does not
occur is known as the UFL Upper Flammable
Limit.

HANDLING AND USING


FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS
One-percent of gasoline vapor and air mixture is too
lean; 8% of gasoline vapor is too rich.
The flammable range is the difference between the
LFL and UFL.
The air and vapor mixture between the LFL and UFL are
flammable and can be ignited by an ignition source.

HANDLING AND USING


FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS
A 55-gallon drum filled with 1/4th of gasoline is more
ignitable than a full 55-gallon drum of gasoline.
Both drums have the same flashpoint, but one has a
better chance of ignition due to the air and vapor
mixture ratio.
Auto Ignition is the minimum temperature at which
flammable gas or vapor and air mixture will ignite from
its own heat source.

HANDLING AND USING


FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS
Make sure to read the warning label on flammable liquids
at work and home.
Store flammable liquids in a cool, dry place and do not
heat above 110 degrees.
When a flammable liquid reaches its auto ignition
temperature, it will ignite.
The best method of preventing spontaneous ignition is
total exclusion of air or good ventilation.

HANDLING AND USING


FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS
Materials such as sawdust, hay, grain, and other plant
products may ignite spontaneously if exposed to
external heat.
In the work environment, all flammable liquids must be
properly labeled, stored, handled, and disposed of
according to company procedures and the
manufacturers instructions.

HANDLING AND USING


FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS
When a flammable liquid is within the explosive range,
take extra precautions and follow the rules.
The potential of mishaps always exist.
Each worker holds the key to safety when working with
flammable liquids. The key to safety is training the
worker with the knowledge to know how to properly
handle flammable liquids.

BONDING & GROUNDING


OF FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS
Static Electricity
Static electricity occurs when electrons are moved
about on a surface.
Static electricity can cause sparks that ignite
flammable liquid when the vapor is ignited.
Almost any movement can create static electricity.
The friction of a comb moving through hair
creates static electricity.
Liquid moving through a pipe or hose
creates static electricity.

BONDING & GROUNDING


OF FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS
When you touch something, static electricity flows
through your body and accumulates at the point
you touch.
Static electricity shock is enough to let you know
youve been shocked.
Static electricity can be reduced by using a ground.
A grounding wire to earth allows the electricity to
flow to ground rather than through the body.

BONDING & GROUNDING


OF FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS
Bonding and Grounding
Gasoline is a flammable liquid and has a flashpoint
of approximately -55 degrees.
Flashpoint is the minimum temperature at
which a liquid gives off vapor in sufficient
concentration to form an ignitable mixture
with air near the surface of the liquid.
An ignition source could be
a spark from car spark plugs.
Liquid

Flammable

BONDING & GROUNDING


OF FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS
Bonding is done to eliminate a difference in
electrical potential between objects.
Bonding and grounding are effective only when the
bonded objects are conductive such as a copper
wire.
Bonding will not eliminate the static charge, but will
equalize the potential between the objects bonded
so that a spark will not occur between them.

BONDING & GROUNDING


OF FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS
To ground a 55-gallon drum, attach a copper
conductive wire to ground and to the drum.
A good contact to the ground is a grounding rod
driven several feet into the earth or to a grounded
water pipe or other approved ground.
The copper wire must connect solidly with the metal
surface of the ground and to the metal surface of
the 55-gallon drum.
The metal drum must not be painted at the point
where the ground wire is connected.

BONDING & GROUNDING


OF FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS
A safety professional or electrical engineer
should test the bonding and grounding.
If you properly ground a 55-gallon drum
and a 5-gallon container, the potential of
static electricity of electrons have no charge.
Both bonded and grounded containers permit
the electrons to flow in the liquid to go to
ground eliminating sparks from static electricity.

BONDING & GROUNDING


OF FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS
When filling your cars gas tank, the stations main
tank and pump are grounded and the connection of
the metal nozzle touching the gas tank forms the
bond between the car and gasoline pump.
When transferring flammable liquid, you should
bond and ground to eliminate an explosion from a
static electric spark.
Flammable liquid flowing through hoses and pipes
are not the only cause of static electricity
anything that moves electrons can create static
electricity.

BONDING & GROUNDING


OF FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS

BONDING & GROUNDING


OF FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS
Always inspect the bonding and grounding wire for
broken or separated conductors.
Bonding and grounding systems should be checked
regularly for electrical continuity.
Many organizations recommend the use of barebraided flexible copper wire.

Bare Copper Ground Wire

HANDLING AND USING


FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS