ISO Certifications

ISO 9000 and ISO 14000

ISO 9000

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A family of standards and guidelines for quality in the manufacturing and service industries from the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ISO 9000 defines the criteria for what should be measured. ISO 9001 covers design and development. ISO 9002 covers production, installation and service ISO 9003 covers final testing and inspection. ISO 9000 certification does not guarantee product quality. It ensures that the processes that develop the product are documented and performed in a quality manner.

ISO 9000
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Certification requires exacting documentation and demonstrations in practice over time. The process, which can take up to a year, involves two major players in addition to the company being certified. A consultant provides a plan for documenting the company's ISO system. Once documented, a registrar interviews the company's management and line staff to make sure that the new system, as documented, has been effectively implemented. Only a few dozen companies worldwide are authorized to conduct such audits for the issuance of ISO 9000 certificates.

ISO 9000

"The standards specify how management operations shall be conducted. ISO 9000's purpose is to ensure that suppliers design, create, and deliver products and services which meet predetermined standards; in other words, its goal is to prevent non-conformity.“ This quality standard was first introduced in 1987 by the International Organization for Standards (ISO) in hopes of establishing an international definition of the essential characteristics of quality irrespective of industry or geographical location.

ISO 9000
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small businesses have decided to seek ISO 9000 certification because of their corporate customers, who began to insist on it as a method of ensuring that their suppliers were paying adequate attention to quality.  Other small business owners, meanwhile, have pursued ISO 9000 certification in order to increase their chances of securing new business or simply as a means of improving the quality of their processes.

Standards of ISO 9000

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The standards of ISO 9000 detail 20 requirements for an organization's quality management system in the following areas: Management Responsibility Quality System Order Entry Design Control Document and Data Control Purchasing Control of Customer Supplied Products Product Identification and Tractability Process Control

Standards of ISO 9000
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Inspection and Testing Control of Inspection, Measuring, and Test Equipment Inspection and Test Status Control of Nonconforming Products Corrective and Preventive Action Handling, Storage, Packaging, and Delivery Control of Quality Records Internal Quality Audits Training Servicing Statistical Techniques

Further ISO 9000
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In addition to ISO 9000, two related quality standards emerged in American industries in the late 1990s. ISO 14000, also known as the Environmental Management Systems Standards, is intended to combine environmental management systems with the ISO 9000 quality system. The second system, QS9000 is an adaptation of ISO 9000 to meet the specific needs of the "big three" American automobile manufacturers—Ford, General Motors, and Daimler Chrysler. Both systems were expected to have a substantial impact on U.S. companies.

ISO 14000

ISO 14000 is similar to ISO 9000 quality management, in that both pertain to the PROCESS rather than to the product itself. The overall idea is to establish an organized approach to systematically reduce the impact of the environmental aspects which an organization can control. Effective tools for the analysis of environmental aspects of an organization and for the generation of options for improvement are provided by the concept of Cleaner Production.

ISO 14000

The ISO 14000 environmental management standards exist to help organizations minimize how their operations negatively affect the environment (cause adverse changes to air, water, or land), comply with applicable laws, regulations, and other environmentally oriented requirements, and continually improve on the same. As with ISO 9000, certification for ISO 14000 is also performed by third-party organizations rather than being awarded by ISO directly. The ISO 19011 audit standard applies when auditing for both 9000 and 14000 compliance at once.

ISO 14000
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The material included in this family of specifications is very broad. The major parts of ISO 14000 are: ISO 14001 is the standard against which organizations are assessed. ISO 14001 is generic and flexible enough to apply to any organization producing any product or service anywhere in the world. (Requirement) ISO 14004 is a guidance document that explains the 14001 requirements in more detail. These present a structured approach to setting environmental objectives and targets and to establishing and monitoring operational controls. (Guidelines)

ISO 14001

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An EMS meeting the requirements of ISO 14001:2004 is a management tool enabling an organization of any size or type to: Identify and control the environmental impact of its activities, products or services, Improve its environmental performance continually, Implement a systematic approach to setting environmental objectives & targets to achieve these. ISO 14001 is the corner stone standard of the ISO 14000 series. It specifies a framework of control for an Environmental Management System against which an organization can be certified by a third party.

ISO 14000 Series
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Other standards in the series are actually guidelines, to help achieve registration of ISO 14001 ISO 14004 provides guidance on the development and implementation of environmental management systems. ISO 14010 provides general principles of environmental auditing. ISO 14011 provides specific guidance on audit an environmental management system. ISO 14012 provides guidance on qualification criteria for environmental auditors and lead auditors (now superseded by ISO 19011)

ISO 14000 series

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ISO 14013/5 provides audit program review and assessment material. ISO 14020+ labelling issues ISO 14030+ provides guidance on performance targets and monitoring within an Environmental Management System ISO 14040+ covers life cycle issues Of all these, ISO14001 is not only the most well known, but is the only ISO 14000 standard against which it is currently possible to be certified by an external certification authority.

That’s all for Certifications

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