You are on page 1of 19

CRITICAL

ANALYTIC
AL
THINKING
Workshop 3; Semester 2,
2011.

TODAY… • Review of critical analytical thinking – what is it? • Critical reading… having a go! • Critical writing… examples to see! .

I knock off work because of other commitments… so keep that in mind…  • Next workshop  13 September. the seminar marks have been pretty strong so far! WELLDONE!!! • Don’t forget your squares!!! Everyone got one? Need some ideas???  • Coming to Jan and me makes a difference… =D . • MDB397 minimaster after this workshop.. so I need time to get through them all!!! Last drafts will be looked at Friday morning – at 1pm Friday afternoon. Week 8: How to write a lit review.. • EDB361 & EAB023 send in drafts to Jan… • So far SPB004 is going really well.Notices… • No workshop next week because you are busy little beeeees… • EDB410 drafts due to me BEGINNING of next week – Monday/Tuesday…Keep in mind I have all 57 of you.

Week 8: How to write a lit review.Notices… • No workshop next week because you are busy little beeeees… • EDB410 drafts due to me BEGINNING of next week – Monday/Tuesday…Keep in mind I have all 57 of you. • MDB397 minimaster after this workshop.. I knock off work because of other commitments… so keep that in mind…  • Next workshop  13 September. so I need time to get through them all!!! Last drafts will be looked at Friday morning – at 1pm Friday afternoon..P Emma Qut . the seminar marks have been pretty strong so far! WELLDONE!!! • Don’t forget your squares!!! Everyone got one? Need some ideas???  • Coming to Jan and me makes a difference… =D • Keeping in touch – Facebook me…But I need to learn how to use it!!! . • EDB361 & EAB023 send in drafts to Jan… • So far SPB004 is going really well.

“Just because research is published in a well-known journal does not automatically make it ‘good’ research”. Creswell (2012). .

2004. bias and inferences (Adapted from: Cottrell. p. Poulson & Wallace.What is critical analytical thinking? ➔ Stand back and evaluate the evidence put forward in support of a belief or claim and adopting and attitude of skeptism or reasoned doubt ➔ Examine and evaluate the beliefs/claims/arguments from different angles and habitually questioning their quality – Are they accurate? ➔ Comparing the same issue from the point of view of other writers and theorists ➔ Considers where the belief or view point/argument leads – what conclusions follow? Are they valid and rational? ➔ Looking for possible flaws in the reasoning. evidence or the way the conclusions are drawn ➔ Being able to argue why/how one set of opinions. 2008. p. results or conclusions is preferable to another ➔ Being on guard for literary devices that encourage the reader to take questionable statements at face value and lure the reader into agreement ➔ Checking for hidden assumptions.275.5) .

Critical analytical thinking when reading means actively looking for the following… ☞Significance – What is important and why? ☞Inference – What is really being said? Reading between the lines ☞Argument – Is it clear and is there enough valid evidence to support the argument/claims? ☞Assumptions – What are their theories and beliefs? Are they valid and convincing? ☞Hidden values – What is not being said? ☞Bias – Is there any? Is it fair? ☞Authors purpose – What is the intention of the author? Why did they write this? ☞Patterns and connections (between points made. between different readings) – Are there any? . arguments & claims.

Differences between critical & non-critical readers… Non.critical readers:  • Take in the facts • Satisfied with what the text says • Discover an accepted interpretation or argument • Restate the key points .

Differences between critical & non-critical readers… Non.g.g.g.g. amount and type of support given to arguments and points made) • Examine choices of content. evaluate and analyse evidence. What’s not being said/included?) . language used and structure made by the author to determine how these choices effect meaning and argument (e.critical readers:  • Take in the facts • Satisfied with what the text says • Discover an accepted interpretation or argument • Restate the key points Critical readers:  • Actively examine. Is it valid & reliable? Is there enough?) • Recognize not only what the text says but how the text presents the subject matter (e. Any bias?) • Recognize how a particular perspective or selection of facts can lead to a particular understanding (e. data & information (e.

25) Type of literatur e Common features Some potential limitations of claims to knowledge – things to look out for!!! .(Poulson & Wallace. p. 2004.

Lets have a go… Firstly. some contextual background… .

86-100. . 23-38. one on the island of Gaua (where only Bislama and English is used). (2011).My Research Topic… A comparative investigation of the use and impact of Bislama (pidgin English) and Merelav (provincial language of Mere Lava) as the medium of instruction on the learning and teaching of English as a foreign language in two primary school sites in Vanuatu. Why 1997? It’s tooooooo old!!!!!  Willans. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. Using pidgin language in formal education: Help or hindrance? Applied Linguistics. F. 18(1). 14(1). J. (1997). Classroom code-switching in a Vanuatu secondary school: Conflict between policy and practice. Two research articles: Siegel. the other on the island of Mere Lava (where only Merelav and English is used).

So lets start doing some critical reading… Siegel (1997) & Willans (2011) .

docx .So how can we start pulling all this together? Refer to .

2004.286. p. p. Challenging others’ work to find a better way of doing things is acceptable. Poulson & Wallace. 2008.276. along with your sources of information and literary evidence ✎Respecting others as people at all times.5 . but indulging in destructive criticism of others’ work and their worth as people just to demonstrate your intellectual prowess at their expense is not. Adapted from: Cottrell.Critical analytical thinking when writing means actively applying the following… ✎Identifying and presenting the significance of the topic/issue or point/argument ✎Being clear what your conclusions are ✎Showing a clear line of reasoning – an argument leading to a conclusion ✎Presenting evidence to support your reasoning ✎Weigh up and evaluate one piece of information against another and show the relevance of links between pieces of information ✎Viewing your topic/subject/issue from multiple perspectives ✎Reading your own writing critically (critical reading).

2004. You should be cautious about asserting greater certainty over your claims to knowledge than you have evidence to support. and about making broad generalisations except perhaps at a high level of abstraction”. (Poulson & Wallace. p.Some useful advice… “As a self-critical writer you will wish to protect your writing from the criticism of the critical readers who are assessing it.19) .

2004.Useful comparisons … (Poulson & Wallace. p.7) .

Profile of a typical academic who assesses your writing… PROFILE OF A TYPICAL ACADEMIC WHO ASSESSES YOUR WRITING: (Poulson & Wallace.8) (Poulson & Wallace. p. 2004. 2004. .

Poulson. M. S. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. L. and Wallace. (eds). (2008). 2-40 . S AGE Research Methods Online. pp. Chapter 1: Critical reading for self-critical w riting. L. (2004).REFERENCES Cottrell. Learning to read critically in teachiing and learning . In Poulson. The study skills handbook (3Ed). M. and Wallace.