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Dealing With Everyday Classroom Problems

Dealing With Everyday Classroom Problems Click On The “Tutorial” Button or Option That Describes You. Tutorial

Click On The “Tutorial” Button or Option That Describes You.

Teacher

Dealing With Everyday Classroom Problems Click On The “Tutorial” Button or Option That Describes You. Tutorial

Tutorial

Student

Dealing With Everyday Classroom Problems Click On The “Tutorial” Button or Option That Describes You. Tutorial
Lesson Content • This instructional activity include ways to deal with topics such as homeless students,

Lesson Content

This instructional activity include ways to deal with topics such as homeless students, hunger in the classroom, lack of supplies, and overcrowded classrooms. The material covered will prepare pre- service teachers to deal with these issues in their classroom.

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Description of Learners

The intended audience for this instruction is undergraduate students who are majoring in any level of education.

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Objectives

Given an introduction to the topics, students will be able to:

1.

reflect, in at least five sentences, on their schooling experience relating to programs to fight hunger.

2.

identify the number of students who are homeless without any error.

3.

identify the percent of the United State’s students who are eligible for free and reduced lunch.

4.

identify the percent of gang members who are below the age of 18.

5.

identify three ways to create a safe space for students.

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Local Neighborhood

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Students’ Home Life

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Problems in the Classroom

1. There are too many students per classroom

2. There are not enough resources for the

students
students

Every school year there are

teachers facing over crowded

classrooms this affects the class’s

behavior, and often leaves some

students being shorted on

On attention top of from that, the classrooms teacher. are often

lacking supplies because the school

district and families cannot afford to

buy supplies.

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This leaves teachers spending, on

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average, $400 a year on classroom

supplies.

has to participate, or student is Next Next
has to participate, or
student is
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Managing Large Class Sizes

Here are some simple ways to manage a large class:

  • 1. Be Strict About Discipline and Rules. This doesn’t mean you have to be a mean teacher. It does mean that you can’t let students get away with little things like talking to their neighbor.

If you have to stop class to manage a conflict between two

students,

don’t expect the rest of the students to sit there

twiddling their thumbs

silently.

  • 2. Allow students to do group work. It is a lot easier to watch over 7 groups rather than

individually watch over 30-35 students.

  • 3. Create seating charts. Seating charts allow the teacher to see if the students are where they need to be

  • 4. Give Every Student a Chance to Participate.

Whether you are

keeping track of who you call on,

playing games where everyone

doing partner work, make sure that every

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involved.

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Dealing With Lack of Supplies

As previously mentioned, teachers often spend

their own money on providing supplies for the

classroom. This is very hard when teachers get

paid very little and/or have personal finances to

pay for.

here is also the option of a classroom donation system However,

epending on the location, some or most of the parents do not

ave money for the supplies.

There is always the option of writing a

grant and receiving money. Writing a

grant application is a majoring

undertaking according to the U.S.

Department of Science & Human Services

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Directions for Question 1

This question is to see if future teachers have an idea on how much school supplies actually cost and how this can be a burden on parents.

On the next slide it will ask you to match a typical school supply item with the correct price.

In order to match these objects you will need to use the “pen” feature.

Directions for Question 1 This question is to see if future teachers have an idea on

The yellow arrow points to the pen feature.

  • 1. Find the pen and click on it.

  • 2. Draw a circle.

  • 3. Press the “esc” key to exit the pen feature

  • 4. Click the “next” arrow to go to the matching section.

Directions for Question 1 This question is to see if future teachers have an idea on
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Question 1

Match an idea with the correct price. Once you are done click the “Next” arrow

Question 1 Match an idea with the correct price. Once you are done click the “Next”

Expo Marker 1616 pack

Expo Marker

pack

pack

Crayola Crayons 2424 pack

Crayola Crayons

Avery 1.5 inch binder

Avery 1.5 inch binder

Five Star Folder “with prongs”

Five Star Folder with prongs”

Question 1 Match an idea with the correct price. Once you are done click the “Next”

Oxford White Index Cards 100ct.

Oxford White Index Cards 100ct.

Avery Plastic Binder Dividers

Avery Plastic Binder Dividers

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Press the “esc” key to exit the

pen feature

$1.9

$1.9

9

9

$2.59

$2.59

$3.5

$3.5

9

9

$12.79

$12.79

$2.1

$2.1

9

9

$3.79

$3.79

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Answers to Question 1

Correct Answers

Expo Marker 1616 pack Expo Marker pack $1.99 $1.99 Crayola Crayons 2424 pack Crayola Crayons pack
Expo Marker 1616 pack
Expo Marker
pack
$1.99
$1.99
Crayola Crayons 2424 pack
Crayola Crayons
pack
$2.59
$2.59
Avery 1.5 inch binder
Avery 1.5 inch binder
$3.59
$3.59
Five Star Folder “with prongs”
Five Star Folder “with prongs”
$12.79
$12.79
Oxford white Index Cards 100ct.
Oxford white Index Cards 100ct.
$2.1
$2.1
9 9
Avery Plastic Binder Dividers
Avery Plastic Binder Dividers
$3.79
$3.79
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Reality of School Supplies

-Parents usually spend around $650 on school supplies and clothes at the beginning of the year.

Reality of School Supplies - Parents usually spend around $650 on school supplies and clothes at

-Teachers spend around $400 per year.

*The reality is supplies are expensive.*

Helpful hints:

  • 1. Limit supply lists to materials that will actually be used or for materials that will be useful for multiple activities.

  • 2. If there are two or three more expensive items needed, try to collaborate

with another teacher who may also need these items. If the items are split

between classes then parents of each class won’t have to spend as much and there will still be a class set.

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The Neighborhood

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American Students Witness Gang Violence

As of 2014, there are 24,250 gangs and 1,150,000 gang members in the United States

Eighty-six percent of U.S. cities with 100,000+ population report gang activity

40% of gang members are under 18.

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American Students Witness Gang Violence As of 2014, there are 24,250 gangs and 1,150,000 gang members
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Gangs in Schools

Students who have family members in gangs or are in gangs themselves, will often see other students who are affiliated with other gangs at school.

This can create a extremely tense and uncomfortable uncomfortable situation for students.

As a teacher, there are ways to make students feel safe and less anxious or even scared when they enter your classroom.

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Creating a Safe Space

  • 1. Have a clean and orderly classroom. This allows students to be less distracted.

  • 2. Make it easy to supervise your students. An idea for this is to put mirrors by the white-board.

  • 3. Ask students to write on the board. It encourages students to be directly involved. It will save you work and allows you face to the students. Keeping your face to the

students is important for good classroom control.

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Creating a Safe Space Cont…

  • 4. Organize the physical space of your classroom for movement and interaction. Make it easy for students to pull their desks together to do small group work. Set it up so that it is easy for you to walk around.

  • 5. Make it safe for students to participate and ask questions. No matter what a student says, make it a habit to respond with respect. Model respect for your students, and teach them to show respect for one another.

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What ideas do you have to create a safe classroom?

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Question

Click on the action that is not a way to create a safe space for students.

*click directly on the answer—not the letter.

A. Having a clean and orderly classroom. B. Getting the students involved. C. Moving around the room when lecturing.

D. Staying in front of the room when lecturing so you can supervise all of the students.

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Correct!

It is actually recommended to have opportunities for student involvement during class. It is also recommended for the teacher to walk around while lecturing. Both of these actions lead to more classroom control and safety.

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OPPS! Please Try Again.

Moving around while lecturing allows the teacher to keep an eye on students, and makes learning more engaging.

OPPS! Please Try Again. • Moving around while lecturing allows the teacher to keep an eye
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OPPS! Please Try Again!

Getting students involved through such activities like writing on the board allows the teacher to keep his eyes on the students. It also offers the opportunity for student participation.

OPPS! Please Try Again! • Getting students involved through such activities like writing on the board
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OPPS! Please Try Again!

Having a clean and orderly classroom is actually a great way to make students feel safe. It allows for less distractions, and the room is more inviting.

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OPPS! Please Try Again! • Having a clean and orderly classroom is actually a great way

Take a Step Toward a Safe Classroom

Look at your classroom and ask yourself if it is a place that is distracting, or a place that encourages students to do their best. If there are papers on the floor or things falling out of desks, it is distracting.

Ask students to write on the board for you. This allows you to keep your eyes on the students. While also allowing students to participate.

Make it safe for students to participate and ask questions. No matter what a student says, make it a habit to respond with respect. Model respect for your students, and teach them to show respect for one another.

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Home Life

As you may already know, students are from all different

types of home. Each student has their own background.

Some teachers assume that all students of the same race or

socioeconomic status have the same background. That is

very untrue.

The next section will walk you through two issues

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facing students that stem from home.

Home Life As you may already know, students are from all different types of home. Each
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American Students Aren’t Eating

Three out of five teachers

American Students Aren’t Eating • Three out of five teachers surveyed report that they see students

surveyed report that they see students regularly come to school hungry because they’re not getting enough to eat at home. A majority of these teachers who witness hunger say the problem is getting worse.

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51 percent of students in pre-kindergarten through 12 th grade in the 2012-2013 school year were eligible for the federal program that provides free and reduced- price lunches.

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American Students Aren’t Eating Cont ..

School Meals Are A Critical Safety Net.

In a survey, a majority of teachers say “a lot” or “most” of their students rely on school meals as their primary source of nutrition.

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American Students Aren’t Eating Cont .. • School Meals Are A Critical Safety Net. – In
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• The total number of known homeless students is Next Next 1,258,182.
The total number
of known
homeless
students is
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1,258,182.

American Students are Homeless

Homeless children enrolled in public preschool and grades K-12 jumped 8 percent, in the 2014-2015 school year, from the previous school year.

• The total number of known homeless students is Next Next 1,258,182. American Students are Homeless
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Benefits of School Breakfast

School meals play an important role in making sure that, even in tough times, kids still get the healthy food they need.

Nine out of 10 teachers agree that school breakfast is especially important for academic achievement.

Teachers credit breakfast with

increased concentration better academic performance better behavior in the classroom decreased tardies or absences

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Fighting Hunger

The Solutions suggested by teachers are to:

increase communication with parents about the school meals that are available.

reduce the red tape that limits participation in meal programs.

decrease stigma by making free breakfast available to all students, not just those with low incomes school meals as their primary source of nutrition.

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Homelessness is Very Serious

Bruce Lesley, president of the First Focus Campaign for Children, said,

“A record number of homeless students mean a record number of our children being exposed to sexual trafficking, abuse, hunger, and denial of their basic needs. The new data means that a record number of kids in our schools and communities are spending restless nights in bed-bug infested motels and falling more behind in school by the day because they’re too tired and hungry to concentrate."

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Did your school provide solutions for hunger?

If your school provided solutions, what were they? Were the solutions

effective? Why or why not?

If it did not, do you think the programs previously mentioned could

have helped students at your school? If so, how?

Write at least 5 sentences.

     

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Some programs that schools have in place to fight hunger are providing students with:

Some programs that schools have in place to fight hunger are providing students with: -Free/reduced school

-Free/reduced school breakfast -Free/reduced school lunch -Free daily snacks -Free summer lunch -A backpack of food for the weekend

Some programs that schools have in place to fight hunger are providing students with: -Free/reduced school

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Teachers Are Taking Action

Teachers Are Taking Action • Most commonly, teachers • assist families in enrolling in school meal

Most commonly, teachers

assist families in enrolling in school meal programs, refer families to resources in the school and

spend money out of their own pockets to buy food for hungry students.

n average, teachers who buy food for hungry kids in their classrooms spend

on average $26 a month.

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Ways to Help Homeless Students

Stabilize the child’s basic needs.

-food

-clothing

-shelter

-medical care

-basic hygiene

-transportation needs resolved

Ways to Help Homeless Students • Stabilize the child’s basic needs . -food -clothing -shelter -medical

Administer a brief educational assessment to the child to determine his or her level of academic ability.

A brief assessment in reading, math, and writing will avoid

teaching above or below a student’s ability while previous

school records are obtained.

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Ways to Help Homeless Students

• Find time each week for new students to “check-in” with their teacher. – Assign an
Find time each week for new
students to “check-in” with their
teacher.
– Assign an adult to check-in daily with new
children during the first month of school.
– Have an adult watch new students during
recess for the first few weeks since play
time may be difficult for new students.
Pair a new student with a “buddy” in
the classroom on the first day of
school.
– Have a buddy will keep new students in
contact with someone who knows their way
around the school.
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Ways to Help Homeless Students

Reach out to parents. Send a “welcome” letter or videotape home to the parents. Create a special invitation inviting parents to a getting acquainted time.

Ways to Help Homeless Students • Reach out to parents. Send a “welcome” letter or videotape

Plan assignments so children can keep up without having to take work home.

Provide school supplies and books.

Don’t withdraw privileges if a new student doesn’t return school materials.

Don’t take possessions away as a disciplinary measure

If a new student falls asleep in class, let her/him sleep. It may be needed rest from living in a car or shelter.

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Question

About how many students are homeless?

Question • About how many students are homeless? a. 1.3 Million b. 2.0 Million c. 1.0
  • a. 1.3 Million

  • b. 2.0 Million

  • c. 1.0 million

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Incorrect! Please Try Again!

Incorrect! Please Try Again! Previous Previous
Incorrect! Please Try Again! Previous Previous
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Correct!

Correct! There is an enormous number of students who are homelessness. Previou Previou s s Next

There is an enormous number of students who are homelessness.

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at school. homelessness. Main Menu Main Menu
at school.
homelessness.
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What we learned

Once again, the concept of teachers spending their own money was addressed in this section. Just as it was in the school supply section.

There are many students who suffer from hunger. One

of the best solutions is having breakfast

More than half of students are eligible for free or reduced lunch.

There are many students suffering from

Homelessness affects about 1.3 million students.

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Overall Assessment

About what percent of students are

Overall Assessment • About what percent of students are eligible for the free and reduced lunch

eligible for the free and reduced

lunch

a.

b.

c.

Correct!

About 50% (51% to be exact) are eligible for the free and reduced lunch program

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OPPS! That is Incorrect.

Please Try Again!

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OPPS! That is Incorrect. • Please Try Again! Previous Previous

Question 2

What percent of gang members are under 18?

a. 40 % b. 60% c. 20% d. 80%

Question 2 • What percent of gang members are under 18? a. 40 % b. 60%
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OPPS! That is Incorrect.

Please Try Again!

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OPPS! That is Incorrect. • Please Try Again! Previous Previous

Correct!

Correct! Forty percent of gang members are under 18. Previou Previou s s Next Next

Forty percent of gang members are under 18.

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Reflection Next Next
Reflection
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After reviewing all of this information, what have you learned? Did that cause you to look at the profession at teaching differently?

Reflection Next Next After reviewing all of this information, what have you learned? Did that cause
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