Nuclear Weapons: Effects, Systems, Cold War  History

Michael May MS and E 1/293 3 October 2005

The Basic Fact for Nuclear  Policy
• One nuclear explosion, easily delivered,  not hard to make, destroys:
– One city or – One airbase or port or – One aircraft carrier

• Question: can a war be won against a  nation armed with nuclear weapons?
  2

Once and Current Thinking
• Nuclear weapons are weapons like  others, to be used to win wars (minority  view, cannot be wholly avoided) • Nuclear weapons make war obsolete, to  be used as deterrents only (majority  view in all nuclear­armed states so far) • Nuclear weapons require a basic  change in how nations deal with each  other if catastrophe is to be avoided    (view of Einstein, US bishops, others) 3

Outline of Lecture
I. Nuclear Weapons and Effects II. Nuclear Weapon Systems, Deterrence III. Nuclear Arms Control IV. Why Do Countries Get or Don’t Get  Nuclear Weapons
  4

I. Weapons and Effects

 

5

Chain Reaction, Critical  Mass, U­235 and Plutonium
• At least 1 fission  neutron must cause  another fission for a  chain reaction to go • The “critical mass”  depends on material,  geometry, density • If > 1 fission neutron  causes fission, the  reaction is explosive
  6

What’s Difficult?
• Only rare natural isotopes (U­235, Th­233)  and artificial element Plutonium are able to  sustain a fast chain reaction • Separating these isotopes or making Pu are  the main cost of making weapons  • A successful weapon program can cost  <~$1 B (e.g. South Africa) • But unsuccessful programs have cost many $ B
  7

A Mushroom Cloud
• Bravo Test • Yield: 15Mt •  Location: Bikini  • Date: 28.Feb.1954

 

8

The Cloud Over Nagasaki August 9, 1945
• Of the 286,000 people  living in Nagasaki at  the time of the blast, 60­ 80,000 were killed at  once.  • At Hiroshima, about 90­ 140,000 out of 310,000  were killed at once. • Similar numbers were  seriously injured
  9

Blast
• The pressure wave is the most reliable  damage mechanism to structures, has  been the basis for military targeting. • It is most effective if the explosion  occurs at the optimum height of burst,  which eliminates fallout. • The distance at which a given damage  occurs increases slowly with yield.
  10

Heat
• Heat can be more destructive than blast,  given clear weather and flammability. • Some calculations show that firestorms  would occur in most cities. • Heat is not effective against many  military structures or protected  personnel.
  11

Radioactivity
• Prompt Radioactivity (Immediate  explosion) • Fallout
– Matters most for low yields (< 10 kt) – Can be shielded against

– Generated by ground bursts – Pattern depends on wind and rain – High yields (> 1 Mt) carried globally
  12

Fire/blast (solid) and Fallout  (line) from 10 kt ground burst in  San Francisco (50% lethality)

 

13

Electromagnetic Effects
• A single high­altitude explosion could disable  many computers, satellites, etc. • Military (including nuclear) command,  communication and control as well as radars  could be affected. • Shielding is feasible but requires considerable  care, in part because of the short time of  energy generation.

 

14

EMP Effect Over US
• In 1962, a high­ altitude detonation  caused street lights,  power circuits, etc.  1300 km away to fail • EMP effects have  not been thoroughly  investigated • Surprises are likely
  15

Global Effects from Large­ Scale Nuclear War
• Climate: “nuclear winter” unlikely,  more local climatic effects possible • Global Fallout: due mainly to high­ yield ground bursts e.g. against  hardened structures such as silos • Bio­environmental Unknowns: likely  to matter, very difficult to research • Targeted countries suffer most damage
  16

What Would Really Happen?
• Could a large metropolitan area  function after one nuclear explosion?   • How long before functioning is  restored, and what factors affect that? • What preparations would help? • These questions, once urgent, have  come up again in connection with  terrorism.
 

17

II. Nuclear Weapon Systems,  Deterrence

 

18

Deployment History
• Starting in the Eisenhower era, over a  thousand ICBMs, hundreds of bombers,  and hundreds of SLBMs were  deployed. These made up the Triad. • MIRVs multiplied these numbers to  where over 10,000 nuclear weapons  were deployed on each side.
  19

Scale of Nuclear Weapons
• Note scale of RV • Each RV in the  missile contains one  weapon • The yield is tens of  times Hiroshima  yield • A submarine can  launch >20 missiles
  20

The Weapons Systems Had  to Survive
• If they did not, they could not deter. Indeed,  survivability on both sides was needed for  deterrence to work stably. • ICBMs in hard silos gradually became  vulnerable to accurate MIRVs. • Subs were made ever more quiet. • Bombers were kept on alert. • Communications and control were duplicated  and hardened but remained in question
  21

The Results
• Large numbers of US and Russian  nuclear forces would have survived  nuclear attack. • Most of the nuclear budget was spent  on survivability, perhaps $4 of $5 T. • Survivability of C3 was harder to prove. • Possible reliance on launch­on­warning  for vulnerable missiles remains a    22 danger.

Why So Many?
• Politics: to argue for fewer did not win  elections in a climate of uncertainty • Service rivalries: the main branches of  service involved had similar numbers • Worst case analysis: while intelligence  put a cap on what the other side had  done, the future was often estimated on  a worst­case assumption.
  23

Did Nuclear Deterrence Keep   the Peace (1)?
• Most analysts think it at least helped:
– There is little or no precedent for a rivalry  like the Cold War NOT leading to war – Many instances of leaders being cautious  about taking any risk of nuclear war exist – Unlike the earlier part of the century, and  perhaps unlike today, no political leader  advocated war to his people
  24

Did Nuclear Deterrence Keep   the Peace (2)?
• On the other hand, many note:
– The US and the Soviet Union were far  apart with quite distinct spheres of power – Their conventional forces confronted each  other far away from the homelands – Territorial ambitions on either side were  limited and well­understood

• Thus the context mattered to make  deterrence stable and limit crises
 

25

III. Nuclear Arms Control

 

26

Arms Control: The SALT Agreements
• By the late 60s, the US was coming  down from >20,000 weapons and the  Soviet Union going up from 10,000 • Some limit was agreed to be needed • The SALT treaties (1972­79):
– Froze the strategic offensive numbers – Prevented an effective ABM system – Did not limit tactical nuclear weapons
 

27

Arms Control: The START  Treaties and SORT
• START I (1991­4) cut strategic arms by about  half, removed them from Ukraine, Byelarus  and Kazhakstan. Now void. • START II (1993­2000) would have cut  another 30% by 2004. No MIRVed ICBMs.  Aborted. • SORT  (2002) cut operational strategic  nuclear weapons by 30­45% more to 1500­ 2000 by 2007. Ten year duration. No  verification provision. Reserve, tactical  weapons not limited.   28

Excess Nuclear Weapon  Materials
• Overproduction and reductions have  led to large quantities of surplus  fissilematerials:

– At least 1000 tons of HEU and 100 tons of  Pu: enough for >104 weapons – Directly usable materials – Nearly all in the US and the FSU states – Some of it under poor or unknown control
  29

Excess Nuclear Weapon  Materials
• This material, along with Pakistani weapons,  constitutes the greatest terrorism danger • The US has had programs to either get rid of  it or put it under better control, but these  programs are going slowly because of  financial and political limitations • Other countries did little, though this may  change following a G­8 resolution and more  recent initiatives
  30

Arms Control:  The Nuclear Test Bans
• Attempting to ban nuclear tests dates back to  the 50s • An important driver was the fear of fallout,  which was eliminated with the Limited Test  Ban Treaty of 1963 (LTBT) John Kennedy • A Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT)  has been signed but cannot come into force  until the US and 43 other specified states  ratify it
  31

Arguments For a CTBT
A CTBT would: • Prevent significantly new weapon  designs in the NWS or any advanced  design (e.g., thermonuclear) elsewhere • Help fulfill NWS obligations under  NPT and thereby bolster the regime • Not adversely affect present stockpiles • Be verifiable in all important respects
  32

Arguments for Nuclear  Testing
• Stockpile weapons change (changing  military and safety requirements,  deterioration, inability to make exact  copies). Uncertainty in performance  increases with each change. • Nuclear laboratories personnel will lose  their ability to make changes reliably. • Verification under 1 KT is not assured.
  33

Status of the CTBT
• The US Senate rejected the CTBT and the  present administration does not support it. • Most states have signed the CTBT and a  number have ratified it.  • It cannot enter into force until the US and  specified other states ratify it. • Moratorium on nuclear testing has held since  1996 except for India, Pakistan (1998) • New weapons under consideration in the US  may require nuclear tests.
  34

IV. Why Do Countries Get or  Don’t Get Nuclear Weapons

 

35

Atoms for Peace
• Fifty years ago, President Eisenhower  proposed a grand bargain that has been  largely followed but needs updating:
– The nations that did not have nuclear  weapons would abstain – In return, those that did would help the  others with civilian applications – An international organization would   monitor the bargain
 

36

Proliferation
• Every state that got nuclear weapons did not  want other states to get them. • After the Permanent Five members of the UN  Security Council got them, they proposed a  treaty to prevent further “proliferation.” • It was not an equal treaty but was widely  adopted. • Why?
  37

The Nuclear Non­ Proliferation Treaty (NPT)
• The NPT which came into force in 1970  and was extended indefinitely in 1995  provides for five nuclear weapon states  (NWS): the US, China, France, the UK  and the Soviet Union, now Russia. • All other signatories were to be non­ nuclear weapon states (NNWS) under  the NPT
  38

The Nuclear Non­ Proliferation Treaty (NPT)
• Today all states are signatories except  India, Israel, and Pakistan, all of which  have nuclear weapons, and North  Korea which has withdrawn. • A number of other states started NW  programs. A few of them (North Korea,  perhaps Iran) are continuing.
  39

The Nuclear Non­ Proliferation Treaty (NPT)
• The NWS agree to work toward the  elimination of all nuclear weapons and to  assist the NNWS in obtaining the civilian  benefits of nuclear energy • The NWS agree not to acquire nuclear  weapons • In associated declarations, the NWS stated  they would not attack or threaten the NNWS  with nuclear weapons except under certain  conditions
  40

The IAEA
• The NPT is supported by other agreements  and institutions, such as the IAEA, which  monitors compliance in the civilian nuclear  sector, and the NSG, which controls exports • These institutions have come under fire  because of North Korean and Iraqi cheating • The IAEA has only as much power as the  parties  give it. In particular:
– It has no enforcement power – Its inspection powers depend on agreement
 

41

The IAEA
• Where political situations permitted,  the IAEA has done a good job at its  assigned tasks • There are a number of technical ways to  strengthen its oversight of facilities and  materials that depend mainly on  political agreements and some  investment for their implementation
  42

The IAEA
• Eisenhower’s grand bargain held as  long as nuclear weapons and materials  were difficult to get. • This is no longer true. • The bargain needs updating if civilian  nuclear applications of all kinds are to  be compatible with international  security.
  43

What’s Wrong with the NPT?
• A state can get most of the way to a   nuclear weapon as a NNWS, then leave • There is no penalty for withdrawing  after cheating • Israel, India and Pakistan are not in • There has been and may still be a black  market in nuclear weapons technology
  44

Some Recent Initiatives to  Fix the NPT
• No new enrichment or separation  facilities (Bush) or put them under  international control (ELBaradei) • Criminalizing nuclear weapon trade  (UNSC) in uniform way around world. • Cooperating to stop illegal trade (PSI)  (Bush), very difficult • Enforcement remains an open question
  45

 

  US  Russia  UK  France  China  Israel  India  Pakistan  North Korea  Iraq  Iran, Brazil,  Japan, …  SA, Ukr, Kaz,  Byel  About 7 Others  About 20  Others 

First Nuclear  Test  1945  1949  1952  1960  1964  ?  1973  1998  None  None  None  ?  None  None 

Who?

# Nuclear  Weapons  12,000  22,000  260  450  400  About 100 

Status  NPT NWS  NPT NWS  NPT NWS  NPT NWS  NPT NWS  Non­NPT  NWS  Non­NPT  NWS  Non­NPT  NWS  NPT NNWS  NPT NNWS  NPT NNWS  NPT NNWS  NPT NNWS  NPT NNWS 
46

 

About 100  unassembled?  10­20  unassembled?  0­10  0, program  forcibly  stopped   0, dual use  programs  0, gave up  NW  0, gave up  NW programs  0, civil    reactors 

Why?
State US Soviet Union/Russia France, UK China Israel India Pakistan North Korea Iraq Various present and former suspects All others Likely Contingent Reason Hitler, later Soviet Union, now? US To remain “great powers” US,  Soviet Union Arabs Domestic preference, prestige, China India; Muslim bomb Deter US, bargaining chip? Deter Iran, Arab leadership? Deter neighbors and/or US, prestige, bargaining chip? No utility, not worth the cost; could change with security perceptions
  47

The Larger Framework of  Nuclear Security
• Nuclear non­proliferation did not work by  itself, it worked within a particular economic  and political framework • The West built a sphere of relative prosperity  and security within which nuclear  proliferation usually made no sense • Now that more countries can build weapons,  the context of prosperity and security remains  essential to successful non­proliferation
  48

So How Was Our Original  Question Answered?
• There was nuclear deterrence but no nuclear  war: both the US and the Soviet Union made  that the first order of business. • Too many weapons and weapon material  were made, which remain to haunt us to this  day. • The US won a “cold peace.” • Now nuclear weapons may  become as much  equalizers as tools of deterrence • Einstein’s quandary remains
  49

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Special offer for students: Only $4.99/month.

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Cancel anytime.