You are on page 1of 51

Psychology 205

Perception

Tues, 21 Jan 03
Day 01

Course Website: http://courseinfo.cit.cornell.edu/
courses/psych205

   
                            Outline
Metaphysics, 
   ontology, cosmology (ontogeny), & epistemology
“Qualities” of Boyle and Locke
   primary ­ extension, shape, motion/rest, number, solidity
    secondary ­ color, taste, sound, warmth, smell
Descartes & dualism
Doctrine of the Specific Energy of Nerves,
   or: Doctrine of Sensory Qualities ­­ Johannes Müller
Conjecture of Dubois­Reymond
Molyneux’s paradox
   
Metaphysics

meta ta physika = “after the things of nature”

Aristotle (384­322 BCE) 

   
Metaphysics

Ontology
Cosmology
Epistemology

   
Metaphysics

Ontology: What is there?
Cosmology: Where did it come from?
(in biological development: Ontogeny)
Epistemology: How do we know it?

   
Metaphysics
Epistemology: How do we know it?

2 options:
knowledge comes to us innately,
     “innate ideas”

   
Metaphysics
Epistemology: How do we know it?

2 options:
knowledge comes to us innately,
     “innate ideas”
knowledge comes to us through
      our senses,
      we know because (of what) we
   perceive
   
“Qualities” of Boyle and Locke (17th cent)
and elaborated from Aristotle

   
“Qualities” of Boyle and Locke 

primary ­ extension, shape, 
motion/rest, number, solidity

   
“Qualities” of Boyle and Locke 

primary ­ extension, shape, 
motion/rest, number, solidity
secondary ­ color, tonality, 
warmth, taste, smell

   
the five senses, five epistemic channels
Aristotle, De Anima

 Latinate Anglo­Saxon

vision to see  seeing, sight 
audition to hear hearing 
cutaneousto touch touching, feeling
       sense
gustation to taste tasting 
olfaction to smell smelling
   
La dame à la
licorne
1483-1500
Flemish, now
in the Musée
de Cluny,
Paris,
details

vision

   
audition

   
touch

   
taste

   
smell

   
Jan Brueghel
de Velours &
Pierre Paul
Rubens,
Allegory of
the senses,
1617-1618,
Prado, Madrid
details

vision

   
audition

   
touch

   
taste

   
smell

   
Hans Makart, The five senses,
~1880, Osterreichische Galerie,
Vienna, details

   
visio audition touch taste olfaction
Other modalities:

kinesthesis
haptics = touch + kinesthesis
vestibular & spatial orientation
body schema
pain

   
available
on
website

   
available
on
website

   
Extra credits

3 max

http://node15.psych.cornell.edu/
susan/extracredit

   
Descartes (17th cent) & dualism

mind ­> mental
body ­> physical

   
Descartes & dualism

mind ­>   mental
body ­> physical

brain ­> physical

   
dualism

mind & brain

   
dualism

mind & brain

philosophy                           biology
cognitive science                         neurophysiology

   
dualism

mind & brain

philosophy                                   biology

perceptual               neurons & neural 
phenomena                          circuitry

   
dualism

mind & brain

philosophy                                biology

perceptual                       neurons & neural 
phenomena                               circuitry

   
“red”
 The Doctrine of the 
Specific Energies of Nerves

  AKA: Doctrine of Sensory Qualities
an explanation of the 
secondary qualities of Locke & Boyle

Johannes Müller (1838) Handbuch der 
Physiologie des Menschen, Vol. V, 
(English translation by William Baly, 1842).
   
also
available on
website

   
I.  External agencies can give rise to no 
kind of sensation which cannot also be 
produced by internal causes, exciting 
changes in the condition of our nerves.

   
II. The same internal cause excites in the 
different senses different sensations, in 
each sense the sensations peculiar to it.

   
III. The same external cause also gives rise 
to different sensations in each sense, 
according to the special endowments of 
its nerve.

   
IV. The peculiar sensations of each nerve 
of sense can be excited by several distinct 
causes internal and external.

   
V. Sensation consists in the sensorium's 
receiving through the medium of the 
nerves, and as the result of the actions of 
an external cause, a knowledge of certain 
qualities or conditions, not of [… the ] 
bodies of the nerves of sense themselves;

and these qualities of the nerves of sense 
are in all different, the nerve of each sense 
having its own peculiar quality [or energy].

   
VI. The nerve of each sense seems to be 
capable of one determinant kind of 
sensation only, and not of those proper to 
the other organs of sense; 

hence one nerve sense cannot take the 
place and perform the function of another 
sense.

   
VII. The central portions of the nerves 
included in the encephalon [brain] are 
susceptible of [the] peculiar sensations [of 
the nerves], independently of the more 
peripheral portion of the nervous cords 
which form the means of communication 
with the […] organs of sense.

   
VIII. The immediate objects of the 
perception of our senses [normally in the 
real world] are merely particular states 
induced in the nerves, and felt as 
sensations either by the nerves 
themselves or by the sensorium;   ...

   
VIII. [cont’d]
… but inasmuch as the nerves of the senses are 
material bodies, and therefore participate in the 
properties of matter {generally occupying space, 
being susceptible of vibratory motion, and capable of 
being changed chemically as well as by the action of 
heat and electricity}, they make known to the 
sensorium, by virtue of the changes thus 
produced in them by external causes, not [...] 
their own condition, but [… the] properties and 
changes of condition of external bodies. 
   
VIII. [cont’d]
… The information thus obtained by the 
senses concerning external nature, varies 
in each sense, having a relation to the 
qualities [or energies] of the nerve.

   
   
5. epistemic channels [each sense];
 external­­>nerves­­>percept
      no ESP [27 Feb]; no organ/nerves for ESP

6. no sensory substitution [1 May]
      blind, deaf ...

7. direct stimulation of the brain
      ­­> Conjecture of DuBois­Reymond

8. summary:   V
   ­­> Molyneux's paradox
     III & IV
 
From VII: Conjecture of DuBois­Reymond
(student of Müller’s)

If one could cross­splice the auditory nerve 
and the optic nerve, would one “see” thunder 
and “hear” lightning?

   
William Molyneux, Dioptrica Nova, 1692

Molyneux’s Paradox ­ the orientation of the
visual field
Relevant to Müller VIII

Molyneux’s Premise ­ depth perception

Moylneux’s Conjecture ­ the blind given sight

   
From VIII: Molyneux’s Paradox

The image on the back of the retina is upside 
down and backwards. Why do we not see the 
world this way?

   
From VIII: Molyneux’s Paradox

Why do we not see the world as upside and 
backwards?

2 general answers:
1. Brain re­inverts the image.   [wrong]
2. “The visive faculty takes no notice of its 
     parts, but uses them as an instrument only.”
     [right]

   
              Psychology 205
                   Perception

the study of how we know about our world; 
the study of our bodies, brains, and the
         functions of our senses;
the study of [some of] the roots of knowledge
and culture