Psychology 205

Perception

Day 12
27 Feb 03
 

 

Parapsychology
mediumship  
psychokinesis 
precognition  
telepathy 

­­  magicians vs. physicists
 ­­ Uri Geller & James Randi
­­  seers
­­  1975, J.B. Rhine

clairvoyance 

­­  autoganzfeld experiments

AAAS accepts in 1969

case studies vs. scientific method
replicability
probability & statistics  ­ a priori ­  chance

       ­ a posteriori ­ base rate

Does use of the scientific method imply that the 
research is science?
 

 

Prelim: Thurs, 4 Mar
during class time
11:30­1:05

comprehensive:       lectures 1­12 (including today); 
chapters 1, 2, 10, 11, 12, 13, Appendix

Question answering session:
Mon evening, 3 Mar
7:00­9:00 PM in Uris 202
 

 

Why is extrasensory perception (ESP) interesting 
theoretically?

 

 

Why is extrasensory perception (ESP) interesting 
theoretically?
1. the role of belief in science (and all of academia)
2. Johannes Müller’s Doctine:

peripheral nervous system (PNS) ­­> CNS
ESP would bypass PNS
no known receptors
direct knowledge of the world without sensory information

3. relation of scientific methods to science

 

 

Scientific Methods ­­> search for patterns and their meaning
null hypothesis 

­­ H0

“no pattern”, 
  no special need for understanding cause

experimental hypothesis  ­­ H1
  there is a pattern of interest

  and we need to understand the cause

 

 

Scientific Methods 
null hypothesis 
­­ H0
experimental hypothesis  ­­ H1
Logic: 3 steps
1. devise situation for statistical test
2. test Ho; that is, assess its probability
3. if improbable, assume H1 is true
           criterion ­­> p < .05 

 

    if not improbable, assume Ho is true
 
           criterion ­­> p > .05

One can never prove the experimental hypothesis true.
Results corroborate theories; 
they do not prove them true or false
Proof of truth is possible only in sufficiently closed systems, 
such as math and logic.
Why?

 

 

Issues:  
1. many H1s  (or H1, H2, H3, H4…)

There are an indefinitely large number of
theories that can account for any set of data.

2. occurrence of logical error in step 3
….if improbable, assume H1 is true

      if not improbable, assume H0 is true

 

Type 1 error ­  reject H0 when it is true
Type 2 error ­  accept H
0 when it is false
 

Example of multiple H1s:
Linear induction

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, .....

k = place in sequence
n = number in that place

 

 

Linear induction

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, .....

k = place in sequence
n = number in that place
Theory 1: n = k  =  6
Theory 2: n = (k­1)(k­2)(k­3)(k­4)(k­5) + k
=  126
 

 

How to assess hypotheses (theories)
data (generated in some systematic way)
statistics (N>>1, not case studies)
our rhetorical devices

 

 

The sign test:

know this

z =     x  ­ 0.5 ­ NP__
sqrt[NP (1­P)]

z     = measure of distribution on a normal (bell­
shaped) curve (like a standard deviation, same
units as measured with d’)

x     = number of occurrences of a particular pattern
of interest
0.5   = "correction for continuity" (magic)
N    = number of observations 
P     = the a priori probability of that pattern
 

 

Examples: coin flips, 

expectation = 0.5 Heads/0.5 Tails

   
Heads     6/10    ­­­>    z =   0.31   p > .75
     12/20        ?
With small numbers we often assume
that things should occur with exact
probabilities. They usually don’t.

 

 

Examples: coin flips, expectation = 0.5
   

Heads     6/10    ­­­>    z =   0.31   p ~ .75
Heads   12/20   ­­­> z =   0.67 p ~ .50

 

 

Examples: coin flips, expectation = 0.5
   

Heads     6/10    ­­­>    z =   0.31   p ~ .75
Heads   12/20   ­­­> z =   0.67 p ~ .50
Heads   60/100  ­­­>    z =   1.90 p < .055

 

 

Examples: coin flips, expectation = 0.5
   

Heads     6/10    ­­­>    z =   0.31  
Heads   12/20   ­­­> z =   0.67
Heads   60/100  ­­­>    z =   1.90
Heads 600/1000   ­­> z =   6.29   
   Law of Large Numbers:

p ~ .75
p ~ .50
p < .055
p < .0000001

likely occurrences converge rapidly
towards expected probabilities

 

 

A Sample ESP Study

 

 

The sign test:

 

z =     x  ­ 0.5 ­ NP__
sqrt[NP (1­P)]
z =     x  ­ 0.5 ­ N/10__
sqrt[N*.1 *.9]
z =     x  ­ 0.5 ­ N/10__
   .9 sqrt[N]

 

 

  Reject H0 : null hypothesis is (incredibly) unlikely, 
           assume null hypothesis is not true
Accept H1 : ESP 

telepathy
or something else?

 

 

chance vs. base rate
a priori vs. a posteriori probabilities
example: live births, male or female

 

 

chance vs. base rate
a priori vs. a posteriori probabilities
example: live births, male or female
“chance”:  50%
base rate: ~52%
 

 

stacking effect

 

 

“Pick a number between 0 and 9”
28% pick 7
14% pick 3

 

 

The sign test:

z =     x  ­ 0.5 ­ NP__
sqrt[NP (1­P)]
z =     x  ­ 0.5 ­ .28N__
sqrt[N*.28* .72]
z =     x  ­ 0.5 ­.28N__
  .45 * sqrt[N]

 

 

“Pick a number between 0 and 9, like 7”
15% pick 7
15% pick 3

 

 

R.D. Laing   Knots  (1974)
“They are playing a game. They are playing 
at not playing a game. If I show them I see 
they are, I shall break the rules … I must play 
their game of not seeing I see the game.”

 

 

Paraphrase of Laing   
“Professor Cutting is playing a game [of spontaneous 
choices]. And he is also playing at not playing a game. 
If I show him I understand his game [of spontaneity], I 
shall break the rules … I must choose my spontaneous 
pattern carefully.”

 

 

One must be wary of stacked situations in 
methodologies of all experiments, not just in those 
investigating the paranormal. Questionnaire studies 
are particularly susceptible. 
           Another set of studies on clairvoyance

Autoganzfeld experiments 

Bem and Honorton, 1994
results favor the existence of some form of psi
anomalous information transfer

 

 

Methodology:
Results:

not flawed
more than reasonable to
reject the null hypotheses
chance      25%
results    ~30­55%
does one have to accept the
experimental hypothesis of 
anomalous information transfer?

 

A framework
 

Response
         Yes
 No
Stimulus

 

 Yes

         Hit

Miss

 No

       False
      Alarm

Correct
Rejection

      
 

Response
         Yes
 No
Stimulus

 Yes

         Hit

Miss

 No

       False
      Alarm

Correct
Rejection

      
      Experimental results
    positive
  negative
(Ho rejected)
(Ho accepted)
Phenomenon
 

 

Exists                       "progress"         Type II error
Does Not Exist       Type I error       not part of
      science
 

      
      Experimental results
    positive
  negative
(Ho rejected)
(Ho accepted)
Phenomenon
 

Exists                       psi exists         Type II error
Does Not Exist       Type I error        ­­­­­­
 

Type I error ­  one says the phenomenon
      exists, but it doesn’t [false alarm]
Type II error ­ one says the phenomenon does
                 not exist, but it does [miss]
       the practice of science deplores (has a bias against) 

Type I errors when a result does not mesh with an
existing fabric of logic and research;
        in such situations it would rather make Type II errors 
Why?
 

 

what are the
relative
costs?

 

 

not settlable, yet
a different venue

How to chose among theories ?
Thomas Kuhn (1977)
Theories should be:
1. accurate in predictions

(across replications)

2. relatively simple
3. broad in scope
4. internally consistent
5. able to generate new research and
new findings
 

 

Theories should be:
1. accurate in predictions

(across replications)
         *2. relatively simple
­­> linear induction

           3. broad in scope
4. internally consistent
         *5. able to generate new research and
new findings
 

 

We are on the verge of breakthroughs in psychical phenomena.
­­­ William James, 1890

 

 

We are on the verge of breakthroughs in psychical phenomena.
­­­ William James, 1890
We are on the verge of vast development in psychic research.
­­­ Lord Rayleigh, 1919
  

 

 

We are on the verge of breakthroughs in psychical phenomena.
­­­ William James, 1890
We are on the verge of vast development in psychic research.
­­­ Lord Rayleigh, 1919
Parapsychology appears ready to make startling advances.
­­­ Time Magazine, 1974

 

 

We are on the verge of breakthroughs in psychical phenomena.
­­­ William James, 1890
We are on the verge of vast development in psychic research.
­­­ Lord Rayleigh, 1919
Parapsychology appears ready to make startling advances.
­­­ Time Magazine, 1974
We believe that the replication rates and the effect sizes achieved 
by one particular method, the autoganzfeld procedure, are now 
sufficient to warrant bringing this body of data to the attention of 
the wider psychological community.
­­­ Bem & Honorton, 1994
 

 

Parapsychology
mediumship     ­­  magicians vs. physicists          ­­> not fashionable
psychokinesis  ­­ Uri Geller & James Randi         ­­> not fashionable 
precognition    ­­  seers         
         ­­> not fashionable, outside of
 supermarket checkout lines 
telepathy 
  ­­  1975, J.B. Rhine
            ­­> not fashionable 
AAAS accepts in 1969

clairvoyance ­­   autoganzfeld experiments              ­­> fashionable 
case studies vs. scientific method

replicability
probability & statistics    ­ a priori ­  chance
 ­ a posteriori ­ base rate
            ­­> role of belief in science

Does use of the scientific method imply that the research is science?
 

       

           
 

             ­­> no, it does not, 

                    but that also doesn’t mean individuals shouldn’t pursue their interests

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Special offer for students: Only $4.99/month.

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Cancel anytime.