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Change

Management

People dontresist change. They


resist being changed! Peter Senge

What is Change Management?


It is generally considered to be an organization-wide change

process, as opposed to smaller changes such as adding a new


person.

It includes the management of changes to the organizational

culture, business processes, physical environment, job


design / responsibilities, staff skills / knowledge and policies /
procedures.

When the change is fundamental and radical, one might call it

organizational transformation

Why is Organization-wide
Change difficult to accomplish?
Organizations go through four stages on the way to

achieving their strategic objective:


Denial
Resistance

Exploration
Renewal

Why People resist to change?

Resistance to change can be a defense mechanism


caused by frustration and anxiety

Individuals may not be resisting the change as much


as they are resisting a potential loss of status, pay,
comfort, or power that arises from expertise
In many cases there is not a disagreement with the
benefits of the new process, but rather a fear of the
unknown future and about their ability to adapt to it.
For example fear that one will not be able to develop
new skills and behaviors that are required in a new
work setting.

Case:California State University


California State University (CSU). Any IT system change that happens at the main campus has to go
through every satellite campus, meaning those 23campuses and thousands of employees, staff, and
students must adapt their IT systems as well. Dealing with change at a smaller organization can be a
nightmare by itself; its worse at a larger organization like CSU.
But, instead of merely throwing their hands up in disgust, the IT department decided to institute an
automated change management system. Using Ciscos Pace functionality, the company can now make
upgrades that will automatically make changes to the entire system. To make their change management
strategy even more effective, they are now defining who can use what system and what changes they
can make to their designated area. Their change management strategy considered the human factor and
not only included the automated system, but also defined roles of change so that it would minimize the
confusion and issues when a change has to be instituted.

Leading Change
Creating A Shared Need
Shaping A Vision
Mobilizing Commitment

Current
State

Transition
State
Making Change Last
Monitoring Progress

Changing Systems & Structures

Improved
State

Leading Change:
Having a champion who sponsors the change.
Creating A Shared Need:

L
e
a
d
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n
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C
h
a
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g
e

The reason to change, whether driven by threat or opportunity, is instilled within the
organization and widely shared through data, demonstration, demand or diagnosis.
The need for change must exceed its resistance.
Shaping A Vision:
The desired outcome of change is clear, legitimate, widely understood
and shared.
Mobilizing Commitment:
There is a strong commitment from key constituents to invest in the change, make it
work,and demand and receive management attention.
Making Change Last:
Once change is started, it endures, flourishes and learnings are transferred throughout
the organization.
Monitoring Progress:
Progress is real; benchmarks set and realized; indicators established to guarantee
accountability

Changing Systems and Structures:


Making sure that the management practices are used to
complement and reinforce change.

S
y
s
t
e
m
s
&
S
t
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c
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How do leaders go about it?


Adopt Change
Roles

Manage
Attention
Master Change
Processes

Demonstrate Personal
Competence

Q x A = E
QUALITY PROCESS
(Technical Strategy)

ACCEPTANCE
(Cultural Strategy)

EFFECTIVENESS
(Overall Strategy)

Change is the law of life and


those who look only to the past or
present are certain to miss the
future John F. Kennedy