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CASE ANALYSIS

CASES
 Supplements rather than replaces
textbook and lectures
 Extends the learning process to the real
world.

Daft, R. and Dahlen, K. 1984. Organizational Theory: Cases and Applications.


RATIONALE OF CASE METHOD
 Based on realistic business / management concerns
 Process used to solve cases is similar to actual business
processes on problem solving
 Develops skills
 Analytical
 Data / fact handling
 Team effectiveness
 Communication and presentation
 Provides a broader view to problem solving
 Learning methodology used by best universities
TYPES OF CASE LEARNING
 Theory application / illustration
 When the problem has been solved and it is
the student’s responsibility to analyze the
outcome and its consequences
 Or evaluate the solution to the case and
propose an alternative solution if necessary

Daft, R. and Dahlen, K. 1984. Organizational Theory: Cases and Applications.


Theory Application / Illustration

IDENTIFICATION RELATIONSHIPS INCONSISTENCIES


•Major emphasis of •Define and point •What characteristics
case? out models and and relationships are
frameworks. inconsistent with the
•Variables and
theories?
concepts that apply? •Identify and assess
relationships among •How can these be
variables applied to the
analysis or plan of
action?

Daft, R. and Dahlen, K. 1984. Organizational Theory: Cases and Applications.


TYPES OF CASE LEARNING
 Problem Analysis
 (More common)
 The objective is to analyze and interpret the
situation.
 Sort out the facts
 Determine cause-and-effect relationships

 Design a solution and plan for implementation

 The goal is to solve the problem

Daft, R. and Dahlen, K. 1984. Organizational Theory: Cases and Applications.


Reminders!
 There is no one best way to go about a
case study.
 Generally accepted practice – subject to
individual preference / style
 There is no one best answer for any case
 Many variables
 Logical assumptions
CASE METHOD PROCESS
 Case reading
 Data collection and interpretation
 Critical issues
 Problem Statement
 Key Objectives
 Areas of Consideration
 Alternative Courses of Action
 Recommendation
 Group Meetings
 Written Report preparation
 Group presentation
Problem Analysis
•Data Collection
and
interpretation. •Identify critical
issues and
•Identify •Theory
problems.
relevant facts. application.
Which models
•Generate
and theories
alternative
Case reading apply?
solutions •Select plan of
Determine •Inconsistencies? action and
basic problems
implementation
List key Analysis
Alternative
objectives
courses of
action Recommendation

Daft, R. and Dahlen, K. 1984. Organizational Theory: Cases and Applications.


Problem Analysis
 One reading of the case is not sufficient to
fully understand the issues presented.
 Read to get an overall sense of the situation
 Assess all the variables involved, the
importance of each, and the nature and scope
of the situation
 Outline significant facts

Daft, R. and Dahlen, K. 1984. Organizational Theory: Cases and Applications.


Problem Analysis
 Data Collection and Interpretation
 Sortingout relevant from irrelevant data to
develop a diagnosis of the current situation

Daft, R. and Dahlen, K. 1984. Organizational Theory: Cases and Applications.


Problem Analysis
 Critical Issues
 Look for factors that threaten the survival,
goals, or performance of the organization or its
major departments
 Think in terms of cause and effect
 Do not confuse the symptoms with the problem
 Dig beneath the surface and determine if
something more basic is generating the
problem you have identified
Daft, R. and Dahlen, K. 1984. Organizational Theory: Cases and Applications.
Problem Analysis
 Critical Issues – Possible questions to ask
 What sort of organization does the case deal with?
 ‘What is the nature of the industry?
 What is happening in the external environment?
 What problem does management (or the central
character) appear to be facing?
 What decisions need to be made?
 What are the objectives of the organization?
 What are the resources required or constraints
influencing the decision?
 What recommendations can help solve the problem?
 How should the plan of action be implemented?
PROBLEM STATEMENT
 Write the identified problem in a one-
sentence statement that concisely
conveys the main concern.
 Generally posed as a question.
 Question should not be answerable by
YES or NO.

Daft, R. and Dahlen, K. 1984. Organizational Theory: Cases and Applications.


KEY OBJECTIVES
 List 3 – 5 key objectives that you aim to attain
once the problem is solved.
 Objectivesshould be directly linked to to the
problem identified.
 Should be addressed by:
 Alternative
Courses of Action
 Recommendation
AREAS OF CONSIDERATION
 Or Analysis of Facts / Situation Analysis
 Focus on the implications of facts
 Use relevant Models / frameworks
 Examples:
 SWOT
 Porter’s Five Forces
 Identify inconsistencies
 Should be vs. Actual
 List all major assumptions made and bases for such
assumptions

Daft, R. and Dahlen, K. 1984. Organizational Theory: Cases and Applications.


ALTERNATIVE COURSES OF
ACTION
 Generating Solutions
 Brainstorm list of possible solutions
 Brainstorming process
 Review PROBLEM STATEMENT and identify
alternatives that have a direct link with solving
the problem

Daft, R. and Dahlen, K. 1984. Organizational Theory: Cases and Applications.


ALTERNATIVE COURSES OF
ACTION
 Generating Solutions
 Combine similar suggestions and begin
eliminating alternatives based on your earlier
analysis of the situation
 Constraints of the organization
 Theoretical concepts

 Goals and objectives

 Interacting variables

Daft, R. and Dahlen, K. 1984. Organizational Theory: Cases and Applications.


ALTERNATIVE COURSES OF
ACTION
 Evaluating Alternatives
 What criteria will you use in evaluating each solution?
 What requirements must a course of action meet?
 Are there cost constraints?
 What about timeliness?
 Resource availability?
 Are there constituents to consider?
 Future shock waves?

Daft, R. and Dahlen, K. 1984. Organizational Theory: Cases and Applications.


ALTERNATIVE COURSES OF
ACTION
= Potential solutions to the problem
 Include a discussion of pros and cons of each
alternative

Daft, R. and Dahlen, K. 1984. Organizational Theory: Cases and Applications.


RECOMMENDATION
 Selecting the Course of Action
 Select the best course of action based on the pros and
cons and the logical assessment of each alternative
 State the specific steps you recommend and why
 Be sensitive to the arguments against your decision
and be prepared to refute any challenges to your
reasoning
 Be willing to take risks that can be supported by your
analysis of the situation
 Be creative and imaginative in developing your solution,
but ensure that it is logically defensible

Daft, R. and Dahlen, K. 1984. Organizational Theory: Cases and Applications.


IMPLEMENTATION PLAN
 Developing the Plan for Implementation
 Consider
 People involved
 Time frame

 Sequence of events

 Will your plan of action address the problem?

Daft, R. and Dahlen, K. 1984. Organizational Theory: Cases and Applications.


Case Method
 There is never enough information to make a
decision
 There is no perfect answer to a case problem
 Make do with the information you have, draw
logical inferences and assumptions from the
available data, and support your arguments with
evidence found in the case and theory

Daft, R. and Dahlen, K. 1984. Organizational Theory: Cases and Applications.


GROUP PRESENTATION
 Prepare your logistics
 Business attire
 Presentation Materials
 All group members must participate
 Avoid reading your report
 Cue cards
 PowerPoint presentation
 Keep the presentation concise
 No need to repeat case facts
 Keep it interesting
 Be prepared to answer questions from the audience