You are on page 1of 14

The 9 Cultural Concepts of Distress in the DSM­5 

•Ataque de nervios (“attack of nerves”: Latino group)
•Dhat syndrome (“semen”: South Asians)
•Khyâl cap (“wind attacks”: Cambodian speakers)
•Kufungisisa (“thinking too much”: Shona speakers in 
Zimbabwe)
•Maladi moun (“sent sickness”: Haitian populations) 
•Nervios (“nerves”: Latinos in the United States and Latin 
America)
•Shenjing shuairuo (“weakness of the nervous system”: 
Mandarin Chinese)
•Susto: (“fright”: Latino group) 
•Taijin kyofusho (taijin­ “between people,” kyofu­ “fear,” 
sho­”disorder”: Japan)

DSM­5 Glossary Entry for Khyâl Cap
Khyâl cap. “Khyâl attacks” (khyâl cap), or “wind attacks,” is a syndrome found 
among Cambodians in the United States and Cambodia. Common symptoms include 
those of panic attacks, such as dizziness, palpitations, shortness of breath, and cold 
extremities, as well as other symptoms of anxiety and autonomic arousal (e.g., tinnitus 
and neck soreness). Khyâl attacks include catastrophic cognitions centered on the concern 
that khyâl (a wind­like substance) may rise in the body—along with blood—and cause a 
range of serious effects (e.g., compressing the lungs to cause shortness of breath and 
asphyxia; entering the cranium to cause tinnitus, dizziness, blurry vision, and a fatal 
syncope). Khyâl attacks may occur without warning, but are frequently brought about by 
triggers such as worrisome thoughts, standing up (i.e., orthostasis), specific odors with 
negative associations, and agoraphobic­type cues like going to crowded spaces or riding 
in a car. Khyâl attacks usually meet panic attack criteria and may shape the experience of 
other anxiety and trauma and stressor­related disorders. Khyâl attacks may be associated 
with considerable disability.
Related conditions in other cultural contexts: Laos (pen lom), Tibet (srog 
rlung gi nad), Sri Lanka (vata), and Korea (hwa byung).
Related conditions in DSM­5: panic attacks, panic disorder, generalized anxiety 
disorder, agoraphobia, posttraumatic stress disorder, illness anxiety disorder. 
 Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, (Copyright © 
2013).  American Psychiatric Association. All rights reserved.

Typical Triggers of a Khyâl Attack
•Worry 
•Fear (e.g., owing to nightmare, startle, trauma recall)
•Anxiety
•Standing up from a lying or sitting position
•Going into crowded areas (“People sickness,” or pul meunuh)
•Riding in a car (“Car sickness,” or pul laan)
•Odors
•Out of the Blue

Symptoms Considered to be Typical of 
a Khyâl Attack 
•Most Common symptom: Dizziness
•Typical symptoms of an attack: 
DSM­panic attack symptoms: fear, dizziness, palpitations, 
shortness of breath
Other ANS­type symptoms: soreness in the joints, neck 
soreness, tinnitus
Other: headache, out of energy

Khyâl Attacks and Culturally Specific Panic Symptoms
•Among Cambodian patients, tinnitus, neck soreness, and 
headache commonly occur in khyâl attacks, with khyâl 
attacks being a common panic­like presentation in that 
group.

Panic attack and other symptoms during a khyâl attack (N = 100)

Tinnitus

Neck soreness

Headaches

Hinton et al., 2010

Khyâl Attack and Anxiety
•Khyâl attacks freqeuntly meet DSM­5 panic attack criteria
•Generalized anxiety symptoms or any anxiety symptom will 
usually be labeled as a khyâl attack or the possible start of one
•Among traumatized populations, negative emotions often 
quickly induce somatic symptoms that then may quickly 
escalate to panic (reactivity hypothesis)
•Among traumatized populations, negative emotions and 
somatic symptoms will often trigger negative memories of 
past, such as of the Pol Pot period, which then become part of 
the khyâl attack

How a Khyâl Attack is Thougth to Occur: 
The Cambodian Pathophysiology
•Normally khyâl and blood flow through conduits in the body 
down the limbs and intestinal tract and out the pores of the body
•In a khyâl attack, the vessels become blocked and the pores close, 
causing an upsurge in the body of khyal and blood to cause bodily 
disasters

A Khyâl Attack (an 

upsurge of khyâl and blood in
the body): Associated
symptoms, ethnophysiology,
and catastrophic cognitions

Head
•headache from khyâl entering the cranium (khyâl may cause syncope)  
dizziness from khyâl entering the cranium (khyâl may cause syncope)    
       
•tinnitus from khyâl exiting through the ears (khyâl may cause deafness 
and syncope)
•blurry vision from khyâl exiting through the eyes (khyâl may cause 
blindness and syncope)

Neck
•neck soreness from khyâl distending the neck vessels (khyâl may cause neck 
vessel rupture) 

Heart and Lungs
•palpitations from khyâl hitting the heart (khyâl may cause heart arrest) 
•chest discomfort from khyâl entering the chest cavity (khyâl may cause asphyxia) 
•shortness of breath from khyâl compressing the lungs (khyâl may cause asphyxia)

Hands and Arms                                     
•cold hands from a lack of flow of khyâl and blood 
to the hands (this lack of flow may cause “death of 
the hands,” i.e., stroke, and an upsurge of khyâl 
and blood in the body)
•sore arms from blockage of blood and khyâl flow 
owing to coagulation­like plugs (this lack of flow 
may cause “death of the hands,” i.e., stroke, and 
an upsurge of khyâl and blood in the body) 

Stomach
•stomach discomfort and bloating from excessive khyâl (khyâl may move up 
from the stomach into the trunk of the body to cause the disasters listed above)

Feet and Legs                                     
•cold feet from a lack of flow of khyâl and blood to the feet (this lack of 
flow may cause “death of the legs,” i.e., stroke, and an upsurge of khyâl 
and blood in the body)           
•sore legs from blockage of blood and khyâl flow owing to coagulation­
like plugs (this lack of flow may cause “death of the legs,” i.e., stroke, 
and an upsurge of khyâl and blood in the body)

A Local Nosology of Anxiety and Panic 
Severity:
A spectrum of khyâl severity
Mild 
khyâl 

Moderate 
khyâl 

Severe khyâl
(called ripe  
khyâl or broken 
khyâl)

Khyâl 
overload 

Coining (“stratching khyâl”): 
Its Role in Healing and Nosology
•A key way of determining the severity of khyâl by 
assessing the color and bumpiness revealed by 
coining
•A key way of removing blockages and restoring 
flow
•A key way to warm the body
•A key way to remove khyâl from the body 

“Coining, or “gaoh
khyâl,” literally
“scratching khyâl”

Image Credit: 
Gregory Juckett, 
MD, MPH

A Local Nosology of Anxiety and Panic 
Severity:
A spectrum of khyâl severity
Mild 
khyâl 

Moderate 
khyâl 

Severe khyâl
(called ripe  
khyâl or broken 
khyâl)

Khyâl 
overload