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JOB ANALYSIS

WHAT IS JOB DESIGN

Job Design: the process of organizing


work into tasks required to perform a


specific job

 All theories of employee motivation


suggest that jobs can be designed
to increase motivation and
performance.
 Three important influences on job
design: work flow analysis; the
strategy of the business and the
JOB DESIGN APPROACHES
 Work Simplification (versus work
elimination)
 Simple, repetitive task that maximize
efficiency
 Assigns most of the thinking to
managers & supervisors
 Can lead to high degrees of
specialization that is not value
added and can not readily adapt to
a changing environment

 Job Enlargement & Job Rotation


 Can reduce fatigue and boredom
 Expands job duties
 Limited in that it focuses on only
one aspect of job motivation

 Job Enrichment
 More opportunities for job
autonomy and feedback
 Limited by technology and
employee capabilities

 Team - Based Job Design


 Focused on team rather than
individual
 Cross training used w/Flat &
Boundaryless organizational
structures

DEFINITION- JOB ANALYSIS

 Job Analysis: the process of collecting


& analyzing information about jobs
to write:

 Job Description: a document that


identifies the tasks & duties
performed by a job

 Job Specification: a document that


identifies the qualifications required
by a job
JOB ANALYSIS - INTRODUCTION
 Job Analysis:
 systematic data
gathering and information
organization with respect to a job.
It identifies the tasks, duties and
responsibilities of a particular job.

 Job analysis is useful for


recruitment, selection,
performance appraisal,
compensation, training, and career
WHAT IS JOB ANALYSIS
 It is a systematic method for
gathering information
 It focuses on work behaviors, tasks,
and outcomes
 It identifies the personal
qualifications necessary to perform
the job and the conditions under
which work is performed
 It reports the job as it exists at the
time of analysis; not as it was in
the past nor as it exists in another
organization
WHY JOB ANALYSIS
 Reduce Role Conflict and Ambiguity
 reduce discrepancy between what
organization thinks job is and what
job is in reality
 Design and Evaluation of Training
 focus training on most difficult and/or
most frequent elements of job
 Performance Appraisal
 criteria for appraisal should be
matched with most important
elements of job

 Job Design
 simplify job with too many disparate
activities


 Personnel Selection
 once the knowledge, Skills and
abilities are identified(KSA’s), job
requirements can be generated

METHODS OF GATHERING
INFORMATION FOR JOB
ANALYSIS

 Questionnaires: the job analyst
administers a structured
questionnaire to employees who
identify the tasks they perform in
accomplishing the job.

 Observation: the job analyst


usually inspects the work being
performed and records his or her
observations.


 Interviews: interviewing both the
employee and the supervisor.

 Employee recording: gathered
by having the employees
describe their daily work
activities in a diary or log.

 Combination of methods: likely,


no one job analysis method will
be used exclusively. A
combination is often more
appropriate.

REASONS FOR GATHERING JOB
INFORMATION
 Staffing (recruitment and
selection) – outlines tasks,
duties and responsibilities –
allowing the recruiter to know key
qualifications need to perform
the job.

 Training and development -


if the specification suggests that
the job requires a particular
knowledge, skill, or ability, and
the person filling the position
does not possess all the
qualifications required, training
 Compensation and benefits -
the relative value of a particular job
to the company must be known
before a dollar value can be placed
on it. From an internal perspective
the more significant its duties and
responsibilities, the more the job is
worth.

 Safety and health - information


derived from job analysis is also
valuable in identifying safety and
health considerations.

 Legal considerations - having


properly accomplished a job
analysis is particularly important for
supporting the legality of
employment practices.
TECHNIQUES OF JOB ANALYSIS
 Task Inventory Analysis:

 Task analysis is conducted to identify the


details of specified tasks, including the
required knowledge, skills, abilities, (KSA)
and personal characteristics required for
successful task performance.
 Three Steps:
 Interview
Survey
Generation of a Task by a KSA
matrix
 Two major benefits: Systematic &
tailor-made
 Weakness: Can have sole reliance on
Functional Job Analysis:

 Uses three systems:


 Department of Labor System
 Sidney Fine's Functional Job
Analysis
 Job Information Matrix System.

 All three systems contain elaborate


definitions and examples of each
item in the worker functions

 This method is based on the theory


that all job situations call for some
involvement on the part of the
worker with data, people and
things. Positions are analyzed
according to these elements.



 Strengths: most established
system of job analysis -
comprehensive, simple to use
and expandable.

 Weakness: simplicity of some of
its scales as well as the rating
activity
 CONCLUSION
 THANK YOU


 PRESENTED BY
 Ammar Juzar
 Ankur Dubey