You are on page 1of 10

BATCH CULTURE

Ganesh Kumar Padmanabhan


Rohit Rajendran
Subramaniam Iswar
Pravin Babu Sivanandam Thangaraj
Raul Tejeida Olvera
Ming Jin

Introduction:
Batch

processes operate in closed systems;


substrate is added at the beginning of the
process and products removed only at the
end.
If there are no leaks or evaporation from the
vessel, the liquid volume in batch reactors
can be considered constant.
Most commercial bioreactors are mixed
vessels operated in batch.
The classic mixed reactor is the stirred tank;
however mixed reactors can also be of
bubble column, airlift or other configuration.

Operation:

Batch cultivation
-

MASS IN THROUGH MASS OUT


THROUGH THE
THE SYSTEM
SYSTEM
BOUNDARIES
BOUNDARIES

d
dt

S0

VR
ci

, X0,
P0

MASS
GENERATED
WITHIN THE
SYSTEM

MASS
CONSUME
D WITHIN
THE
SYSTEM

MASS
ACCUMULATE
D WITHIN THE
SYSTEM

VR = culture volume

= VR + rfi

Vr

Ci =
moles i
unit culture volume
rfi =moles I formed by the
reaction
unit culture volume unit
time

St

, X t Pt

Important equations for a


batch process:

Advantages
Simplicity

of use.
Operability and reliability.
Production of secondary metabolites that are not
growth-related (i.e., produced when the organism
enters stationary phase);
Fewer possibilities of contamination: all of the
materials required for the bioprocess are present
in the vessel and sterilized before the run starts.
The only material added (with the exception of
the inoculum at the beginning of the bioprocess)
and removed during the course of a batch
fermentation are the gas exchange, and if using a
bioreactor, sterile antifoam and pH control
solutions if required.
It is easy to assign a unique batch number to
each run, generating high confidence in the
history of each batch of product. This is critically

Disadvantages
Culture

ageing, and more importantly differentiation,


can be a specific problem, especially so with growthrelated products ;
Build up of toxic metabolites can restrict cell growth
and product formation;
Initial substrate concentrations may have to be
limited due to problems with inhibition and repression
effects, therefore affecting the amount of product
that can be obtained from such simple systems;
The use of batch cultures in industrial systems can
lead to an increased nonproductive period due to
down time required for cleaning, re-sterilization,
filling and cooling of equipment;
Cellular autolysis may occur during the decline and
stationary phase, affecting the amount of product, its
composition and potentially adding to downstream
processing challenges due to release of autolytic
breakdown products, activation of proteases.

Practical Fermentation Technology Edited by Brian McNeil and Linda M. Harvey


2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. ISBN: 978-0-470-01434-9

Xanthan gum Production

Time (hrs)

THANK YOU FOR YOUR


ATTENTION!!