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POP ART

Pop Art – An art movement and style that had its origins in England in the
1950s and made its way to the United States during the 1960s.
The 1950s were a period of optimism in Britain following the end of war-time
rationing, and a consumer boom took place. The development of Pop Art was
fuelled by this consumer boom.
Pop Art brought art back to the material realities of everyday life, to popular
culture (hence the term ``pop'').
Pop artists focused attention upon familiar imagesof popular culture such as
billboards, comic strips, magazine advertisements, and supermarket products.
They often took inspiration from Pop music, Movies and the fashion industry.
Although starting in England, America quickly took over as the centre of the Pop
Art revolution.
Leading American Exponents; James Rosenquist, Roy Lichtenstein, Andy
Warhol, Jim Dine, Claus Oldenburg, Jasper Johns
Leading British Exponents: Richard Hamilton, David Hockney, Eduardo
Paolozzi, Peter Blake.

James Rosenquist

Rosenquist is a core member of the 1960s pop art movement.
As a struggling young artist, Rosenquist made his living as a
sign and billboard painter. His work incorporates the
techniques he honed as a sign painter and the imagery of
advertising embraced by pop artists. His paintings typically
include a juxtaposition of isolated and seemingly unrelated
images that, when taken as a whole, communicate a pointed
message. This mural, created for the 1964 world's fair,
comments on the race between nations to get to the moon.

Artist: James Rosenquist Artist's Lifespan: 1933Title: President Elect
Date: 1960

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1974 .James Rosenquist Off the Continental Divide (1973 .

90 x 141" Gift of Seymour H. Knox.James Rosenquist Nomad. and wood. plastic.1963 Oil on canvas. 1963 .

1963 Oil on canvas with wood and wire I Love You with My Ford. . born 1933 1. 3.James Rosenquist United States. 1961. Outside. 2.

) World's Fair Mural 1964. 240" x 240" .James Rosenquist (American. oil on masonite. 1933.

. This could then be used to generate compostion for painting.Create you own arrangement of images from today to create a ‘Rosenquist’ style collage.

Roy Lichenstein Blam 1962 Oil on canvas 68 x 80 in Yale University Art Gallery. New Haven .

ROY LICHENSTEIN Takka Takka 1962 Oil on canvas 56 x 68 in Museum Ludwig. Cologne .

Roy Lichenstein In the Car 1963 Magna on canvas 172 x 203.5 cm (67 5/8 x 80 1/8 in.) .

Roy Lichenstein Whaam! 1963 Magna on canvas 172 x 269 cm (68 x 106 in. London .) (two canvasses) Tate Gallery.

Mustard on white 4.In the Car. Write down 3 interesting facts that you have discovered.Whaam! .1997) 1. then add bold and bright Pop Art colours. 1. Write a paragraph describing the work of Lichtenstein. Draw in pencil first.Roy Lichtenstein (1923 . Which is your favorite picture and why? 3.Takka Takka. 4. 2.Create a sketchbook page that combines/contains at least 3 of these 5 images. 2. After describing the work attempt to answer the following questions (a) Where do you think Lichtensteins ideas come from? (b) What do you think of the work. Brushstroke 3. Research the life and work of Lichtenstein using one of the recommended Art internet sites 5.

Andy Warhol .

Flowers Andy Warhol .

Warhol Triple Elvis 1963 65x90cm (26"x 36") .

6 x 76. © 2002 Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts/Artists Rights Society (ARS). and crayon on paper. felt-tipped pen. Roll of Bills. 1962. Purchase. Pencil. New York .Andy Warhol. 40 x 30 1/8" (101.4 cm).

ANDY WARHOL SCREEN PRINTS. .

Andy Warhol) 1.Self portrait 6. Write a paragraph describing the work of Warhol. 2. . After describing the work attempt to answer the following questions (a) Where do you think Warhol’s ideas come from? (b) What do you think of the work. Research the life and work of Andy Warhol using one of the recommended Art internet sites. then add bold and bright Pop Art colours.Che Guevara 3. Draw in pencil first.Flowers.Create a sketchbook page that combines/contains at least 3 of these 5 images.Canned Foods 2.Marilyn 5. (c) Which is your favorite picture and why? 3. 1.

1969-1970 .Claes Oldenburg. Giant Ice Bag.

Write a paragraph describing the work of Oldenburg After describing the work attempt to answer the following questions (a) Where do you think Warhol’s ideas come from? (b) What do you think of the work. .3 D WORKS BY CLAES OLDENBURG 1. Research the life and work of Oldenburg using one of the recommended Art internet sites. Draw in pencil first. Which is your favorite picture and why? 3. then add TONE or COLOUR.Create a sketchbook page that combines/contains at least 3 of these 5 images. 4. 2. Write down 3 interesting facts that you have discovered.

WAYNE THIEBAUD. CYNTHIA POOLE and NANDA PALMIERA . GUNTER BEIER.

Wayne Thiebaud. PAINTINGS .

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. Sweeter still are his depictions of licorice all sorts (you can practically taste the faint coconut flavour of the pink one) or ribbons of traditional black licorice.GUNTER BEIER German painter Günter Beier puts the popcorn into pop art with detailed canvases of childhood treats.

CYNTHIA POOLE .

. sections from serial boxes ect. Trace the image and add Colour. Use sweet and choc bar wrappers. crisp packets. Use a range of media. Photograph your collage. Project onto screen.WRAPPERS Make a collage using examples of packaging. Include some areas of collage.

Nanda Palmieri .

Still Life Paintings by Vic Vicini .

Pamela Johnson .

Create your own large scale paintings of sweets and sweet wrappers. .

3 x 154 cm) The Museum of Modern Art.Flag. and collage on fabric mounted on plywood (three panels) 42 1/4 x 60 5/8" (107. oil. New York . 1954–55 Jasper Johns Encaustic.

Jasper Johns. 0 through 9.8 cm. Tate Gallery.2 x 104. oil on canvas. 137. 1961. London .

JIM DINE NINE HEARTS .

JIM DINE BATHROBES .

LOVE1966. Indianapolis Museum of Art. . oil on canvas. 1928-). American. 71 7/8 x 71 7/8 inches.Robert Indiana (born Robert Clark. IN.

Richard Hamilton: ‘Just what is it that makes today's’ homes so different. so appealing? Collage 1956. .

Interior II1964.6 cm.Richard Hamilton (English. London . oil. 121. cellulose paint and collage on board.9 x 162. Tate Gallery. 1922-).

Target with four faces Jasper Johns .

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1976. Blake. Peter .3].“Got a Girl" [O.

On the Balcony 1955-7 Peter Blake .

Here. . however.Peter Blake Self Portrait with badges 1961 This painting has been seen as a parody of Thomas Gainsborough's 'The Blue Boy'. In 1961 these would have been seen as the epitome of American popular culture and the youthful rebellion represented by James Dean. one of the most famous works of British art. the blue is that of Blake's denim jacket and jeans.

PepperAlbum Cover .PETER BLAKE The Beatles Sgt.

The Toy Shop 1962 Peter Blake .

Artist Peter Blake Title "Well." . "I never expected I should be a Queen so soon. this is grand!" said Alice.

1967 .David Hockney. acrylic on canvas. A Lawn Being Sprinkled.

David Hockney: "A Bigger Splash" .

David Hockney: Portrait of his mother Photography ‘joiner’ .

DON EDDY .

at first glance. He said. advertising and mass communication is probably not in the same sense as an older generation… I've been conditioned by them and grew up with it all and use it without a second thought'. . recalls contemporary abstract painting.Peter Phillips The entertainment machine 1961 Peter Phillips The Entertainment Machine is a depiction of a fruit machine that. 'My awareness of machines.

.Eduardo Paolozzi Collage from BUNK Sir Eduardo Paolozzi 2004. mostly given to him by American ex-servicemen in Paris in the late 1940s. The word 'BUNK' stems from Henry Ford's statement. 'History is more or less bunk … we want to live in the present'. It reflects Paolozzi's belief that art should respond to contemporary culture. BUNK is the title for a series of works that were originally pages of a scrapbook in which Paolozzi had stuck cuttings from magazines.

Patrick Caulfield born 1936 Pottery 1969 Oil on canvas support: 2134 x 1524 mm painting The pottery objects in this painting have been depicted from different viewpoints depending on their situation in the overall composition. those near the centre appear to be viewed from eye level and those towards the top of the canvas are shown from below. This device emphasises the overall effect of the stacking up of a large number of similar objects. (From the display caption February 1996) . The artist has written of this painting that it 'was an excuse for me to use a lot of colour'. The simple black outlines and strong colours are characteristic of much of Caulfield's work. Thus those near the bottom of the image are painted as though seen from a point somewhere above.