Following Following the the Food Food Product Product Flow Flow

RBP. Pg. 109 – 170 RSG. Pg. 90 - 134

4

Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

1

Following the Following the Food Product Flow Food Product Flow
Points to Ponder
 What are the steps in the flow of food?  What purchasing and receiving procedures enhance the protection of food?  How do you determine whether a product is safe to receive?  What are the proper product temperatures for receiving, storage, and cooking?

Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 109 – 110 RSG. Pg. 91

2

Following the Following the Food Product Food Product Flow
More Points to Ponder
 How do you prevent contamination in the steps throughout the flow of food?  How does the food employee’s personal hygiene affect the safety of food throughout the flow of food?

Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 109 – 110 RSG. Pg. 91

3

The Flow of Food
In retail food establishments, the flow of food:
 Begins when food is purchased  Ends at the time of checkout & bagging.

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Flow of food
Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 113 – 114 RSG. Pg. 94

4

Purchasing
Purchasing product specifications include:
 Quality grade  Weight  Count  Contents  Packaging type.
Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

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Purchase from reputable sources only. RBP. Pg. 110 – 111
RSG. Pg. 92

5

Delivery
Food delivery vehicles should be clean and in good repair!

Check in deliveries carefully!

Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 111 RSG. Pg. 92

6

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Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 109 – 114 RSG. Pg. 90 - 94

7

Receiving: Inspection
Determine food quality by using your senses –
 Sight  Touch  Smell.

WHEN IN DOUBT DON’T ACCEPT IT!

Determine food quality before you accept it!
Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 112 RSG. Pg. 93

8

Receiving: Temperature
Check the temperature of all food products before accepting them to ensure they are not in the Temperature Danger Zone.
Use approved temperaturemeasuring devices to verify proper temperatures.

Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 113 RSG. Pg. 93

9

Receiving: Proper Receiving
Refuse or return products that:
 Show signs of spoilage  Do not meet quality standards  Are delivered in damaged packaging.

Store refused products away from accepted products.
RBP. Pg. 114 – 115 RSG. Pg. 94 - 96

Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

10

Receiving:

Packaged Goods – Reduced Oxygen Packaging
Reduced Oxygen Packaging (ROP)
 Packaging that has had oxygen removed or replaced by another gas  Increases shelf life of foods.
Vacuum packed vegetables
Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 116, 151 – 154 11 RSG. Pg. 96 - 100

Receiving:

Importance of Proper Packaging
The common purpose of the package is to:
 Protect the contents from contamination  Provide a source of information about its nutritional contents  Provide advertising material  Make the product more convenient for customers to transport, prepare, and serve.

Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 116 RSG. Pg. 95 - 96

12

Receiving: Hermetically Packaged Goods
Check product packaging for:
     
Leaks Bulges Dents Broken seals Missing labels Rust.

Check packaging quality.

Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 117 RSG. Pg. 96 - 97

13

Food Irradiation
Food irradiation is a method of preserving foods. Irradiation is safe and has been approved by the FDA as a method of preserving many foods.

Radura symbol

Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 118 – 119 RSG. Pg. 100 - 101

14

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Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 112-119,151-154 15 RSG. Pg. 93 - 101

Receiving: Red Meats
The inspection of red meats for wholesomeness by the USDA is mandatory. Grading of red meats is voluntary.
Red meats
RBP. Pg. 119 – 129 RSG. Pg. 101 - 102

Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

16

Receiving: Poultry

Fresh poultry should not:
Be discolored Have dark or purple wing tips.

Wing tips are purple indicating spoilage.

Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 121 – 123 RSG. Pg. 102 - 103

17

Receiving: Eggs and Egg Products

Eggs are a common source of Salmonella enteritidis bacteria.
Eggs and egg products
Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 123 – 124 RSG. Pg. 103 - 105

18

Receiving: Dairy Products
Dairy products must be handled carefully and kept out of the Temperature Danger Zone!

Cheese

Milk
Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 124 – 125 RSG. Pg. 104 - 105

19

Receiving: Seafood
Fresh fish should have clear, bulging eyes and a firm, shiny skin with the scales intact.
RBP. Pg. 125 – 127 RSG. Pg. 105 - 107

Fresh fish
Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

20

Receiving: Fruits and Vegetables
Fruits and vegetable that will be washed by the consumer prior to consumption do not have to be washed at the establishment before they are sold.

Fresh vegetables
Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 127 – 128 RSG. Pg. 108

21

Receiving: Juice
Juices sold in retail food establishments that have not been pasteurized, or juice that has been packaged in a retail food establishment that doesn’t have a HACCP plan must bear a warning label!
Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 128 – 129 RSG. Pg. 109

22

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Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 119 – 129 RSG. Pg. 101 - 109

23

Storage: FIFO

Store foods properl y.

To ensure product freshness and quality, use the First In, First Out inventory method!
Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 129 – 130 RSG. Pg. 110

24

Type of Storage: Refrigerator
Refrigeration
• • Slows microbial growth Used to store potentially hazardous and perishable foods for a short period of time Store potentially hazardous foods at 41oF (5oC) or below Space products to allow cold air to circulate around them Refrigerators must have a temperature-measuring device located to measure the air temperature in the warmest part of the unit.
RBP. Pg. 130 – 131 RSG. Pg. 111 - 112

• • •

Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

25

Type of Storage: Freezer
Freezer
Used to store foods for longer periods of time Keeps foods solidly frozen Prevents microbial growth, but does not destroy all microbes Holds foods below 0oF (-18oC) Space products to allow cold air to circulate around them Package foods tightly to avoid freezer burn Freezers must have a temperature-measuring device located to measure the air temperature in the warmest part of the unit.

Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 131 – 132 RSG. Pg. 112

26

Type of Storage: Dry Storage
Dry storage is used to store less perishable items and non-potentially hazardous foods.

Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 132 – 133 RSG. Pg. 114

27

Storage Don’ts
Do Not Store Food:
      
In toilet rooms In locker areas In mechanical rooms Under piping Under sewage lines Among chemicals With personal items.

Store foods in proper places.
Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 133 – 135 RSG. Pg. 114

28

Chemical Storage
Most chemicals are poisonous and must be properly labeled and stored away from:
    
Food items Single-service items Utensils Equipment Paper goods.
RBP. Pg. 134 – 135 RSG. Pg. 113 - 114

Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

29

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Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 129 – 135 RSG. Pg. 109 - 114

30

Freezing
Freezing foods helps to maintain quality and freshness for longer periods of time as long as the food remains solidly frozen.

Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 129, 139 RSG. Pg. 109 - 110

31

Thawing
Acceptable methods of thawing foods include:
 In a refrigerator (preferred method)  In a microwave  Submerged under cool running water  Slacking  As part of the cooking process.
Never thaw foods at room temperature!

Submerged in cool running water
RBP. Pg. 140 - 142 RSG. Pg. 118 - 119

Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

32

Cooking
Cooking greatly decreases the risk of foodborne illness!

Methods of cooking
Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 145 - 147 RSG. Pg. 122 - 123

33

Cooking: Time and Temperature Guidelines
 Beef roast (rare) –
 130oF (54oC) for 112 minutes or  140oF (60oC) for 12 minutes

 Eggs, beef/pork, fish –
 145oF (63oC) for 15 seconds

 Ground beef, ground pork, and ground game animals –
 155oF (68oC) for 15 seconds

 Beef roast (medium), pork roast, ham –
 145oF (63oC) for 4 minutes

 Poultry, stuffed meats –
 165oF (74oC) for 15 seconds.
Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 145 – 147 RSG. Pg. 122 - 123

34

Cooling
To ensure safe food, hot foods must be:
Cooled from 135oF (57oC) to 70oF (21oC) or below within 2 hours

Proper cooling techniques

and
From 135oF (57oC) to 41oF (5oC) within six hours.
Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 147 – 150 RSG. Pg. 123 - 124

35

Reheating
To reheat foods quickly:
Reheat in small quantities Use preheated ingredients Stir foods frequently.
RBP. Pg. 150 – 151 RSG. Pg. 125 - 126

For quality and safety reasons, reheat foods only once.

Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

36

Cold-Holding
Cold-holding – Maintain the internal temperature of the food at or below 41oF (5oC).

Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 142 – 144 RSG. Pg. 119 - 120

37

Hot-Holding
Hot-holding – Maintain the internal temperature of the food at or above 135oF (57oC).

Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 150 – 151 RSG. Pg. 125 - 126

38

Food Handling

Handle tongs, serving spoons, and other utensils without touching foodcontact surface!

Handle utensils properly.
Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 154 – 155 RSG. Pg. 126

39

Food Sold or Received
Food that has been served or sold to, and is in the possession of, a customer may not be returned for service or sale with few exceptions

Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 155 – 156 RSG. Pg. 127

40

Discarding or Reconditioning Food

Ready-to-eat foods must be discarded if an employee who has been restricted or excluded from working with food has contaminated them.
Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 155 RSG. Pg. 126

41

Refilling Returnable Containers

A take-home food container returned to a retail food establishment may not be refilled with a potentially hazardous food at the establishment.
Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 155 – 156 RSG. Pg. 127

42

Sales:

The Self-Service Bar

Sneeze guards keep foods from being contaminated by customers.

Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

Sneeze guards help protect food. RBP. Pg. 156 – 158
RSG. Pg. 127 - 128

43

Checkout and Bagging

This is the last, but an important step, in the flow of food in retail food establishmen ts!
Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 158 - 159 RSG. Pg. 128 - 129

44

Service: Temporary and Mobile
Temporary and mobile food facilities include:
     
Catering Food sampling carts Mobile carts Tents at festivals Street fair pavilions Vending machines. Temporary

and mobile food service
RBP. Pg. 159 - 161 RSG. Pg. 129 - 131

Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

45

Service: Home Meal Replacement
Home meal replacements come in varieties including:
 Ready-to-cook  Ready-to-heat  Ready-to-eat.
RBP. Pg. 162 – 163 RSG. Pg. 131 - 132

Ready-to-eat foods

Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

46

S ty fe a S

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Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg.129, 135 - 161 RSG. Pg. 109-110, 114-133

47

Session 4 Concepts to Keep
 Only purchase food products from reputable suppliers.  Use sensory evaluation techniques when receiving food products.  Ensure proper temperatures are maintained throughout the delivery, receiving and storage process.  Common signs of food spoilage include off-color, foul odors and slimy textures.
Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 109 – 170 RSG. Pg. 90 - 134

48

Session 4 More Concepts to Keep
 Raw foods must be fully thawed and prepared within four hours including the time to cool foods to 41oF (5oC) or below.  Foods must be cooked to required temperatures for specific periods of time.  Foods must be held outside the temperature danger zone 41oF (5oC) to 135oF (57oC).  Reheat foods to 165oF (74oC) within two hours.

Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 109 – 170 RSG. Pg. 90 - 134

49

Session 4 More Concepts to Keep
 Store products at least 6 inches off the ground.  Date all products and rotate using the first in, first out (FIFO) storage method.  Handle all utensils and plateware by the handle or from the bottom to prevent cross contamination.  Food employees should avoid bare hand contact with ready-to-eat foods.
Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 109 – 170 RSG. Pg. 90 - 134

50

“Take This Back To Your Team!”
 Foods must be held outside the temperature danger zone 41oF (5oC) to 135oF (57oC).  Ensure food safety throughout the flow of food.  Determine food quality through sight, smell, and touch.  Check packaging of foods for quality.  Store, cook, and hold foods properly and at the right temperature.

Adapted from Retail Best Practices and Guide to Food Safety and Sanitation © 2003

RBP. Pg. 109 – 170 RSG. Pg. 90 - 134

51

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