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CGC-5

Maintenance Manuals and specifications


Theory: 4 hrs.
Practical: 3 hrs.
Total: 7 hrs.
Level of Instruction Level 2

Learning-Teaching Methods
Lecture-Discussion
Demonstrations
Group and Individual Assignment
Practical Activities
2

Assessment Methods
1. Written Exam
2. Individual & Group Assignment
Results

Reference Materials
1. Aviation Maintenance Technician Handbook,
General, June 2009 FAA -8083-30(ATB)

2. Aviation Maintenance Technician Handbook,


Airframe Vol-1 & 2, June 2012 FAA -8083-31

SAFETY
SAFETY FIRST
THINK ALWAYS ABOUT SAFETY

WIIFM
WHAT EVER THE AIRCRAFT TYPE U ARE GOING TO OPERATE, FIRST
AND FOREMOST U MUST EXAMINE THE RECORD VERY CAREFULLY.
ONLY THEN U CAN KNOW THE STATUS OF THE AIRCRAFT WETHER IT
IS AIRWORTHY. AND AFTER MAINTENANCE ACTIVITIES U MUST
RECORD THE ACTIVITIES AS PER THE REGULATION. U FAILED TO DO
IT U WILL BE ASKED FOR EVERY PROBLEM THAT WILL BE CREATED.

NOT TO BE IN JAIL!
NOT TO LOOSE INCOME!

Learning Objectives
At the end of the lesson, trainees will be able to:
Identify & access industry manuals, specifications &
drawings
Interpret & apply information
Store manuals, specifications or drawings
Interpret documentation
Complete documentation
Store & distribute documentation

Topics

Industry Manuals & Specifications

Using Industry Manuals

Storing Manuals

Maintenance Documentation
requirement

Maintenance Records & Forms

Completing Maintenance Documentation


Forms
10

Copyright 2012 The Boeing Company. All rights reserved.


Reproduced courtesy of The Boeing Company.
Figure 1. The technical documentation for Boeing aircraft
model.
11

Figure 9. Boeing's transition from paper


technical data to PDA-accessible data.

12

Maintenance EASA - Maintenance means


any one or combination of:
overhaul,
repair,
inspection,
replacement,
modification or
defect rectification of an aircraft or
component, with the exception of preflight inspection.
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1. Industry Manuals & Specifications

14

1.1. Aircraft Publications & Maintenance Manuals


Publications are source of information for guiding mechanics,
(FAA regulations, AD, AC & specifications of aircraft, engines &
propellers, Manufacturers Service Bulletins/Instructions)
Manuals used for aircraft maintenance :
o Aircraft Maintenance Manual (AMM),
o Illustrated Parts Catalogue (IPC),
o Structural Repair Manual (SRM)
o Component Maintenance Manual (CMM)
o Wiring Diagram Manual (WDM)
Issued as required to provide information or instruction for modifying
earlier production engines or parts to the latest configuration,
15

1.1.1 Manufacturers Service Bulletins/Instructions

MFG SERVICE BULLETINS/INSTRUCTIONS


Issued by airframe, engine or component vendor
Compliance not mandatory
Contents of service bulletin
Purpose of issuing
Name of applicable airframe, engine or component
Estimated man hour
Tools & materials required
Detail instruction for service/adjustment/inspection/
repair
16

1.1.2. Maintenance Manual

The AMM shows how to remove, refit and test a


component
Aircraft maintenance is the overhaul, repair, inspection
or modification of an aircraft or aircraft component.
Contains complete instructions for maintenance of all
systems and components installed in the aircraft.
Contains information for the mechanic who normally
works on components, assemblies, and systems while
they are installed in the aircraft.
(description, servicing, loads, tolerances, adjustments,
levelling, balancing, list of special tools)
17

1.1.3. Overhaul Manual


Contains instruction required for the major
overhaul,
Contains brief description information and
detailed step by step instructions on a unit
that has been removed from the aircraft.
Simple and uneconomical parts to overhaul
are not covered in the overhaul manual.

18

1.1.4. Structural Repair Manual

gives the dimensional limit to the damage to aircraft


structure,
gives time limit as to when it should be fixed,
provides the approved repair method or repair
scheme and approved materials to be used to repair
the damage.
carries detail information for the technician
concerning an aircrafts primary and secondary
structure,
19

Contd
criteria for evaluating the severity of the detected
damage, determining the feasibility of a repair,
and alignment/inspection information.
This manual is usually a separate manual for
large aircraft. On small aircraft, this information is
often included in the AMM.
(skin, frame, rib, stringer, material & fastener
substitutions and special repair techniques)

20

1.1.5. Component Maintenance Manual

Information necessary to maintain and repair or o/h


components of the aircraft.
Contains:
Description and operation
Testing
Disassembly
Cleaning
Checking
Repair and assembly
test
21

1.1.6. Illustrated Parts Catalog


Content/list of parts are included,
Identification and registration of parts,
Presents component breakdowns of structure and
equipment in disassembly sequence,
Included exploded views or cutaway illustrations
for all parts and equipment manufactured by the
aircraft manufacturer,
22

1.1.7. Wiring Diagram Manual


Schematic drawing of the wiring of an electrical
system
Simplified conventional pictorial representation of
an electrical circuit.
Shows the components of the circuit as simplified
shapes, and the power and signal connections
between the devices.
A wiring diagram is used to troubleshoot problems
and to make sure that all the connections have
been made and that everything is present.
23

1.1.8. Aircraft Maintenance Logbooks

Logbook records add value to aircraft performance,


logbook records can help you spot recurring problems,
logbook records can protect you against liability. If you do
not log it it did not happen,
Logbook records are proof that you are completing
inspections and performing routine maintenance,
Ideally, three logbooks should be used: (1) airframe, (2)
engine and (3) propeller.
It is legal to have one logbook with an index for each of the
above.

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Logbooks
25

Logbooks

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27

1.2. Minimum Equipment List

o MEL, is a categorized list of systems, instruments and


equipment on an aircraft that may be inoperative for flight.
o The MEL is defined on a per aircraft model basis.
o MEL need not include items like wings, flight controls,
complete engines, landing gears etc., the airworthiness and
correct functioning of which is absolutely necessary before
any flight.
o It may also not include items like galley equipment,
entertainment systems, passenger convenience equipment,
which do not affect the airworthiness of an aircraft.
o All items which affect the airworthiness of aircraft or safety of
those carried on board and are not included in MEL are
automatically required to be operative.
28

Cont.
A Minimum Equipment List (MEL) is an FAA approved document
that allows an aircraft owner/operator to fly with a certain
item(s) inoperative. The FAA produces a Master Minimum
Equipment List (MMEL) for most aircraft to use. They provide
the format that is acceptable to the administrator.
A minimum equipment list (MEL) - subject to specified
conditions, prepared by an operator (ICAO Annex 6: Operation
of Aircraft).
The master minimum equipment list (MMEL) -for a particular
aircraft type by the organization. The MMEL may be associated
with special operating conditions, limitations or procedures.
(ICAO Annex 6: Operation of Aircraft).
29

Maintenance Related Documents


Code of Federal Regulations (CFRs)
FAA regulations that govern todays aircraft
are found in Title 14 of the Code of Federal
Regulations (14 CFR).
There are 68 regulations organized:
Into three volumes under Title 14,
Aeronautics and Space.
A fourth volume deals with the Department
of Transportation, and the fifth volume is
focused on NASA.
30

CFR 14 chapters
CHAPTER I - FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION,
DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION
CHAPTER II - OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF
TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS)
CHAPTER III - COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION,
FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF
TRANSPORTATION
CHAPTER V - NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE
ADMINISTRATION
CHAPTER VI - AIR TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM STABILIZATION

31

Cont.
1.3.1. Code of Federal Regulations (CFRs)
There are three primary regulations that govern the
airworthiness of an aircraft. The Big Three are:
14 CFR Part 21 Certification Procedures for
Products and Parts,
14 CFR Part 43 Maintenance, Prventive
Maintenance, Rebuilding, and Alterations,
14 CFR Part 91 General Operating and Flight
Rules,
-established by law to provide for the safe &
orderly conduct of flight operation & to prescribe
airmen privileges and limitations,
32

Advisory Circulars (ACs)


The FAA issues ACs to inform the aviation public
in a systematic way of non-regulatory material.
provide guidance and information in a designated
subject area,
or to show a method acceptable to the
Administrator for complying with a related federal
aviation regulation.
ACs are issued in a numbered-subject system
corresponding to the subject areas of the Federal
Aviation Regulations,
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34

Airworthiness Directives (ADs)

Require correction of unsafe conditions by


notification to owners and operators of certified
aircraft that a known safety deficiency with a
particular model of aircraft, engine, avionics or other
system exists.
ADs may be divided into two categories:
1. Those of an emergency nature requiring
immediate compliance prior to further flight, and
2. Those of a less urgent nature requiring compliance
within a specified period of time.
35

Aircraft Listings
This document contains the specifications
and data for certificated aircraft when the
number of registered aircraft is 50 or fewer.

36

Aircraft Specifications
Specifications were originated during implementation of
the Air Commerce Act of 1926.
Specifications are FAA recordkeeping documents issued for
both type certificated and non-type-certificated products,
Specifications covering type-certificated products may be
converted to type certificate data sheets at the option of the
type certificate holder. However, to do so requires the type
certificate holder to provide an equipment list.
A specification is not part of a type certificate.
Specifications are subdivided into five major groups as follows:
Type Certificate , Approvals, Engine Ratings, Engine Approvals

37

Aviation Maintenance Alerts (AC 43-16)

Monthly electronic publication of the FAA that


provides information concerning malfunction or
defects observed by technicians throughout the
aviation industry.
The data is supplied to the FAA on FAA Form 80104, Malfunction or Defect Report, which may be
submitted to the FAA either electronically via the
Internet, or by downloading a paper copy and
completing it manually.
38

Supplemental Type Certificates (STC)


Is a document issued by the FAA approving a
product (aircraft, engine, or propeller)
modification.
The STC defines the product design change, states
how the modification affects the existing type
design, and lists serial number effectivity.
It also identifies the certification basis listing
specific regulatory compliance for the design
change.
The STC and its supporting data (drawings,
instructions, specifications, and so forth) are the
property of the STC holder. You must contact the
STC holder to obtain rights for the use39of the STC.

40

Type Certificate Data Sheets (TCDS)

Is a formal description of the aircraft, engine, or propeller.


It lists limitations and information required for type certification
including airspeed limits, weight limits, thrust limitations, and
so forth.
Type certificate data sheets and specifications set forth
essential factors and other conditions which are necessary for
U.S. airworthiness certification.
Aircraft, engines, and propellers which conform to a U.S. type
certificate (TC) are eligible for U.S. airworthiness certification
when found to be in a condition for safe operation and
ownership requisites are fulfilled.

41

Cont.
Type certificate data sheets were originated and first
published in January 1958.
14 CFR part 21, 21.41 indicates they are part of the type
certificate.
As such, a type certificate data sheet is evidence the product
has been type certificated.
Generally, type certificate data sheets are compiled from details
supplied by the type certificate holder; however, the FAA may
request and incorporate additional details when conditions
warrant.
Under federal law, no civil aircraft registered in the United
States can operate without a valid airworthiness certificate.

42

Cont.
This certificate must be approved and issued by the FAA; and it
will only be issued if the aircraft and its engines, propellers,
and appliances are found to be airworthy and meet the
requirements of an FAA-approved type certificate.
The FAA issues a type certificate when a new aircraft, engine,
propeller, and so forth, is found to meet safety standards set
forth by the FAA.
The TCDS lists the specifications, conditions, and limitations
under which airworthiness requirements were met for the
specified product, such as engine make and model, fuel type,
engine limits, airspeed limits, maximum weight, minimum
crew, and so forth.
TCDSs are issued and revised as necessary to accommodate
new models or other major changes in the certified product.
TCDSs are categorized by TCD holder and product type.
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44

Air Transport Association (ATA) Specifications

To standardize the technical data and maintenance


activities on large and therefore complex aircraft,
the ATA has established a classification of
maintenance related actions.
These are arranged with sequential numbers
assigned to ATA chapters.
These chapters are consistent regardless of which
large aircraft is being worked on.
45

46

Using Industry Manuals

47

Accessing Industry Manuals, Specifications & Drawings

The original equipment manufacturer (OEM)


is usually the best source of information for
the operation of and maintenance on a
particular product.
The manufacturer is required by 14 CFR part
21, 21.5 to provide a current approved
airplane or rotorcraft flight manual and (if
applicable) a rotorcraft maintenance manual.
48

Identification Of Aircraft Hardware, Materials & Components

Is identified for use by its specification


number or trade name. Threaded fasteners
and rivets are identified by Air Force-Navy
(AN), National Aircraft Standard (NAS), and
Military Standard (MS) numbers.
Quick-release fasteners are identified by
factory trade names and size designations.
Materials and components can be identified
as per the description manuals,
49

Calculating Dimensions From Drawings

Calculating allowable dimension variations


on a component from information in drawing
title blocks and drawings,
Calculating dimensions from drawings for
the purpose of manufacturing aircraft
components and hardware,
50

Use of the Industry Manuals, Specifications & Drawings

Locating & Interpreting Relevant Chapter Or Section Of A


Manual

Appropriate manuals are identified and accessed for


the type of aircraft or component to be maintained.
Amendment status is clearly established to ensure
the correct specifications and procedures are
applied.
Relevant chapter or section of manual or drawing is
located in relation to the work to be carried out.
Information is interpreted and procedures to be
followed are accurately determined.
51

Identifying & Interpreting Information


from Drawings & Diagrams
Documentation requirements are determined and accessed,
where necessary, from relevant sources in accordance with
regulatory and enterprise procedures.
Information contained in existing documentation is interpreted
correctly and, where necessary, requirements carried out in
accordance with regulatory and enterprise procedures

52

Identifying & Applying Work Steps on the Manual

Work steps are correctly identified in accordance


with manual or specification procedures.
All correct sequencing and adjustments are
interpreted in accordance with information contained
in industry manuals or specifications.
Manual, specification or drawing changes and/or
amendments are incorporated documented correctly
in accordance with statutory regulations and/or
enterprise.
53

Storing Manuals

54

Storage of Manuals, Specifications Or Drawings


Manuals, specifications or drawings are stored appropriately
to ensure prevention ready access and updating of
information, when required, in accordance with enterprise
procedures
prepare an expandable file folder sectioned off by the
alphabet.
Gather your manuals. Sort these manuals according the
alphabet.
Check each manual to make sure that you still have that
appliance.
55

3.2. Requirements For Custody & Upkeep Of Industry Manuals

14 CFR Part 91.417 spells out what maintenance records are


required and how long those records must be kept by the
owner/operator.
Two different categories. Category A (permanent records) and
Category B (expiring records).
Category A records are those maintenance records that
must be kept and maintained for the aircraft indefinitely.
Category A records reflect the current status of the aircraft
with respect to issues such as inspections, life-limited parts,
major changes to type design, and AD compliance.
Looking at 14 CFR Part 91.417 (a)(2) we see the list of
records that must be retained and transferred with the
aircraft at the time the aircraft is sold (Ref 14 CFR Part
91.417(b)(2)).
56

Cont.
Temporary Records 14 CFR 91.417(a)(1) and (b)(1)
These are records that must be kept by the owner until the
work is repeated, superseded, or 1 year has transpired since
the work was performed.
These are typically records referring to maintenance,
preventive maintenance, alteration, and all inspections. They
include a description of the work performed (or reference to
the FAA-accepted data); the date of completion; and the
name, signature and certificate number of the person doing
the return to service (RTS).
57

58

4. Maintenance Documentation
Requirement

59

Maintenance Terminologies
NEW ENGINE:
A new engine is one that has been manufactured from all new parts and
tested by an FAA-approved manufacturer.
NEW LIMITS:
These are the FAA-approved fits and clearances manufacturers adhere to
with new engine.
SERVICE LIMITS:
The service limits are the FAA-approved allowable wear fits and tolerances
to which a new limit part may deteriorate and still be a useable
component.
OVERHAULED ENGINE:
An engine that has been disassembled, cleaned, inspected, repaired in
accordance with manufacture overhaul instructions and tested using FAAapproved procedures.
REBUILT ENGINE:
This is an engine that has been overhauled using new and used parts to
new limits by the manufacturer or an entity approved by the manufacturer.
60

Required Maintenance Documentations

Display your aircrafts Airworthiness Certificate, issued by the


Federal Aviation Administration,
Ensure your aircraft has a Registration Certificate if you will
be flying it in National Air Space,
Radio Station License if you plan to undertake any
international flights. Get the license by completing Form 605,
available from the Federal Communications Commission,
Check that a copy of your aircrafts Operating Limitations are
on board, which refers to a number of documents; both a
Pilots Operating Handbook and a FAA-approved Airplane
Flight Manual,
Ensure you have a copy of the weight and balance
information for your aircraft. These are initially provided by
the manufacturer, but you will have to get new weight and
balance documentation every time you adjust the aircraft;
61

Regulatory & Enterprise Documentation Procdures

Certification of aircraft by the FAA ensures


that commercial and general aviation
aircraft meet the highest safety standards,
from initial design to retirement.
It outlines the aircraft certification
processes, lists important aircraft safety
information, and provides guidance on
general aviation aircraft.
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5. Maintenance Records & Forms

63

Maintenance Records
Owner Responsibilities
Acceptable means of compliance with general aviation
maintenance record making & keeping is stated in
14 CFR part 43 & 91
RESPONSIBILITY - Owner or operator
Maintaining proper records
Presenting to maintenance personnel for proper entry
Transferring records to new owner
Presenting for inspection by FAA/EASA & local CAA
64

Cont.
Records Required
TYPES OF RECORD
Airframe record
Engine record
Propeller record
Appliance record
Airworthiness parts tag
Airworthiness directive record
65

Cont.
Records Required
On aircraft, engine, propeller, rotor and appliances
Maintenance and alterations
100hr /annual/progressive inspection
Total time in service
Current status of life limited parts
Time since overhaul
Current status of ADs
AD revision date, method of compliance and due date
66

Cont.
Format Of Maintenance Records

No specified format for maintenance record

Must satisfy requirement of FAR part 91.173

Must provide the necessary information

67

Cont.
Retention Of Maintenance Records
Temporary records
Records that may be discarded of work is repeated or
superseded
For one year after work is performed
Permanent records
Records that must be retained
To be transferred to new operator when selling the a/c
68

Cont.
Lost Or Destroyed Records
Additional data for which there is no designated
place in the logbook are inserted in a manila
envelope, which is pasted inside the back of the
binder.
This envelope should not become a catchall for
data that should be an entry in the logbook, or
that is not pertinent to the purpose of the logbook.
69

Cont.
Recording Of Major Repairs & Alterations
In most cases when a major repair or alteration is
accomplished, FAA Form 337, Major Repair or Alteration, is
completed at least in duplicate with the original going to the
aircraft owner and a copy sent to the FAA Aircraft,
If a certificated repair station completes a major repair, it may
provide the customer with a signed copy of the work order and
a maintenance release signed by an authorized representative
of the repair station, instead of the FAA Form 337.
If extended range tanks are installed in either passenger or
cargo compartments, the technician must generate a third FAA
Form 337 for the modification.
This copy must be placed and retained in the aircraft. (Refer to
91.417(d).)
70

Maintenance Record Content & Entries

Aircraft Repair Entries


Excludes inspection entries (those are covered in43.11).
This section deals exclusively with maintenance record
entries.
As stated in the explanation of 43.3, a certificated pilot is
authorized to perform preventive maintenance on the
aircraft he or she owns or operates, must make a record
entry of the preventive maintenance
There are three distinct issues to be addressed in the
maintenance entry, and they answer the questions of
what? when? and who?
71

Cont.

Certificated repair Station Entries


An organizational chart.
Procedures for maintaining rosters.
Description of housing, facilities, and equipment.
Procedures for revising the capability list and
conducting a self-evaluation (audit).
Procedures for revising the training program.
Procedures governing work done at another
location.

72

Cont.
Certificated repair Station Entries
Procedures for working on air carrier aircraft.
Description of the required records and record keeping.
Procedures for revising the repair station manual.
Description of the system to identify and control the sections
of the manual.
All records from repair station maintenance activity must be
kept a minimum of 2 years.
Domestic repair station certificates are effective until they are
surrendered, suspended, or revoked.
The certificates of foreign repair stations expire, usually after
1 or 2 years, and must be renewed.
73

cont.
Aircraft Inspection Entries
Type of inspection and brief description of inspection
Date of inspection and aircraft total time in service
Signature, certificate number of person performing
inspection
Declaration statements
I certify that this particular aircraft has been
inspected in accordance with --- and was determined
to be in airworthy condition
74

cont.
Airworthiness Directive Compliance Entries
Date
Total time
AD number
AD revision date
Method of compliance
Due date if AD is recurring
Name, signature, and certificate number
75

Cont.
FAA Form 337 Major Alteration & Repair Entries
A major repair or major alteration shall record it on FAA
Form 337 and have the work inspected and approved by a
mechanic who holds an Inspection Authorization.
A signed copy shall be given to the owner and another copy
sent to the local FSDO within 48 hours after the aircraft has
been approved for return to service.
However, when a major repair is done by a certificated repair
station, the customer's work order may be used and a
release given as outlined in Appendix B of FAR Part 43.

76

Cont.
Preventive Maintenance Recording
Requirements
Identify equipment that need PM to achieve
conformity to product requirements,
Determine and define the methods of PM (usually
detailed by manufacturer of equip. in user
manuals)
Determine & define frequencies of PM (usually
detailed by manufacturer of equip. in user
manuals)
Provide evidence (records) that PM's were done
per schedule & method
77

Forms
Airworthiness Certificates

A Certificate of Airworthiness (CoA), or an


airworthiness certificate, is issued for an aircraft by the
national aviation authority in the state in which the aircraft is
registered.

Each airworthiness certificate is issued in one of a number of


different categories.(Transport, Acrobatic, Manned free balloons,.)

A certificate of airworthiness is issued when the aircraft is


registered in the name of the owner.
78

Cont.
Aircraft Registration
14 CFR Part 47 Aircraft Registration
This regulation provides the requirements for registering
aircraft.

It includes procedures for both owner and dealer registration


of aircraft.

This registration is accomplished by the use of FAA Form


8050-1, Aircraft Registration Application.

The white original and the green copy must be submitted to


the FAA Aircraft Registration Branch (AFS-750).
79

Cont.

The pink copy serves as the temporary authority to operate


the aircraft until the official registration is received from
AFS-750, and is valid for a maximum of 90 days.
A successful review of the application will result in the
issuance of AC Form 8050-3, Certificate of Aircraft
Registration. (Note the AC prefix.)
If the registration is ever lost or damaged, it may be
replaced by contacting the FAA Aircraft Registration Branch
and providing them with the aircraft specific data, including
make, model, N-number, and serial number.
80

Cont.
5.3.3. Radio Station License
Is required if the aircraft is equipped with radios, and the
aircraft is planned to be flown outside the boundaries.
A radio station license is not required for aircraft that are
operated domestically. (A major change occurred on
February 8, 1996, when the telecommunications Act of 1996
was signed into law.)
The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) formerly
required that any communication transmitter installed in
aircraft be licensed.
These FCC licenses were valid for 5 years. Note that this is
not an FAA requirement.
81

Cont.
5.3.4. Operating Instructions
Aircraft Operating Instructions must list the specific title or
company identifier for the Aircraft Operating Instructions (AOI)
provided with the light-sport kit or aircraft, including the
revision level, if applicable.
The Aircraft Operating Instructions also must contain the
consensus standard used to develop the AOI.

82

Cont.
5.3.5. Weight & Balance Data
Documents issued by manufacturer are
Aircraft flight manual (AFM)
Pilot operating hand book (POH)
Aircraft weight & balance report that contains
Basic EW & EWCG of new aircraft

When a/c undergone extensive repair/major alteration


New weight & balance record should be prepared
83

CONTD
WEIGHT & BALANCE DATA CONTD
Important weight & balance information on AS/TCDS are
Operating CG range

Oil capacity & loc

Maximum Weight

unusable oil

No of seats & loc

Datum location

Max baggage & loc

Leveling means

Fuel capacity & loc

Engine Hp

Unusable fuel

Mfg serial no

Note: AS/TCDS/AFM/POH does not provide EW of aircraft


84

CONTD
WEIGHT & BALANCE DATA CONTD
Documents issued by FAA
Aircraft Specification (AS)
Applies to a/c certified under CAR before 1958
Includes list of equipment with weight & arms
Aircraft Type Certificate Data Sheet (TCDS)
Applies to aircraft certified by FAA & FAR after 1958
Equipment list with weight & arms is separate
document
85

Cont.
Forms
Form 8130-3, Authorized Release Certificate,
Airworthiness Approval Tag
Order 8130.21, Procedures for Completion and
Use of FAA Form 8130-3
Form 8130-6, Application for US Airworthiness
Certificate
Form 8130-9, Statement of Conformity
Form 337 (PDF), Major Repair and Alteration
86

5.4. Other Maintenance Documents


5.4.1. Maintenance Logs
A close counterpart to the system configuration document is the
maintenance log.
A maintenance log is a document (often relatively simple) that
records who did what, when, and why. ...
Maintenance logs are extremely useful for troubleshooting
recurring or obscure problems,

87

Cont.
5.4.2. Service Tags Or Removal Tags

88

Cont.

5.4.4. Process Sheet & Task Card


A typical process sheet consists of the following
sections:
Product/system description: what to produce or
install
Process description: what stages are involved
in product/system manufacturing/installation
Procedures & instructions: how to
produce/install the product/system89

Cont.

Labor & technology: who will produce/install the


product/system and what tools & equipment will be
used
Budget: what amount of funds is required to
implement the process
Process sheets are developed for various
departments and workshops as guidelines that
explain how to perform installation or manufacturing
of certain products/systems.
90

Cont.
5.4.5. Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) Or
Material Record Sheets
Is an important component of product stewardship
and occupational safety and health.
It is intended to provide workers and emergency
personnel with procedures for handling or working
with that substance in a safe manner,
MSDS formats can vary from source to source
within a country depending on national
requirements.
91

Cont.

92

Cont.
5.4.7. Maintenance Reports
14 CFR Part 25 Aircraft Aviation safety Reporting and recordkeeping
requirements (operation vs maintenance)
IFF inoperative. [IFF = Identification, Friend or Foe.].---. IFF
always inoperative in 'off' mode.
Evidence of leak on right main landing gear.---. Evidence
removed.
The FAA publishes alerts regarding aviation maintenance, as a
way to share information between those who maintain and
operate aviation products.
For metallurgists or materials scientists it may be interesting to
see what sort of problems occur and can be remedied during
maintenance.
Good to see these appear rather than accident reports.

93

Cont.

5.4.8. Irregularity Reports


135.65Reporting mechanical irregularities.
Each certificate holder shall provide an aircraft
maintenance log to be carried on board each
aircraft for recording or deferring mechanical
irregularities and their correction.
The pilot in command shall enter or have entered
in the aircraft maintenance log each mechanical
irregularity that comes to the pilot's attention
during flight time.
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6. Completing Maintenance Documentation Forms

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6.1. Information Requirements for Documentation

FAR 91.417 requires the following additional


information to be maintained in the aircraft
maintenance records:
Total time in service of the airframe plus each engine
and propeller.
Current status of any life-limited parts.
Time since last overhaul of all items required to be
overhauled at a specified TBO.
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cont.

Current inspection status of the aircraft, including the


time since the last required inspection.
Current status of applicable Airworthiness Directives,
including method of compliance and, for recurring ADs,
the time and date when the next action is required.
Copies of all Form 337s required for major alterations
(including any items approved via STC, even innocuous
ones such as aftermarket strobe lights and sun visors).
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6.2.Completing Maintenance Records

( 43.2Records of overhaul and rebuilding.


Information requirements for new documentation or
updating of existing documentation are determined to allow
for accurate completion of records,
Documentation is completed accurately and clearly to enable
information to be easily read or interpreted,
All procedures for storing and distributing documentation are
followed to ensure ready access when required in
accordance with regulatory and enterprise procedures,
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cont.

Information is design to help keep records of entre aircraft in


order, simplifying recordkeeping & ensuring compliance with the
regulation
To keep records of entire aircraft in order the following done
information are needed:
Inspection activities
Tests activities
Repairs activities
Alternations activities
Airworthiness directives
Service bulletins
Equipment additions
Removals or exchanges
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6.3.Completing Forms

This advisory circular (AC) provides instructions for completing


Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Form 337, Major Repair
and Alteration (Airframe, Power plant, Propeller, or Appliance).
The form serves two main purposes:
(1) To provide aircraft owners and operators with a record of
major repairs and major alterations indicating the details and
approvals.
(2) To provide the FAA with a copy of the form for inclusion in
the aircraft records at the FAA Aircraft Registration Branch,
AFS-750.
This form can be completed on paper or by using the electronic
FAA Form 337. Information can be found online at
http://eformservice
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6.4. Completing Logs , Tags, & other sheets

The FARs, placed primary responsibility for both maintenance


and recordkeeping directly on the shoulders of the aircraft
owner, not the mechanic or shop.
"Each owner or operator of an aircraft ... (b) shall ensure
that maintenance personnel make appropriate entries in the
aircraft maintenance records indicating that the aircraft has
been approved for return to service."
and FAR 91.407 says:
"(a) No person may operate any aircraft that has undergone
maintenance ... unless ... (2) the maintenance record entry
required by 43.9 or 43.11, as applicable, of this chapter has
been made."
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6.5. Storing & Distributing Documentation

Store electronic documents:


where they are stored, for how long, migration of the documents, and
eventual document destruction.
A published document for distribution has to be in a format that can not
be easily altered.
An original master copy of the document is usually never used for
distribution other than archiving.
Distributing electronically needs the equipment tasking the job has to be
quality endorsed AND validated. Similarly quality endorsed electronic
distribution carriers have to be used.
This approach applies to both of the systems by which the document is to
be inter-exchanged, if the integrity of the document is highly
in demand.
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Cont. ..
FAR 91.417 goes on to define how long such maintenance
records must be retained by the aircraft owner:
Records of maintenance work and inspections performed must
be kept until the work is repeated or superseded by other
work, or for one year after the work is performed.
Records of total times-in-service, times since overhaul, current
inspection status, current AD compliance and 337 forms must
be retained permanently and transferred with the aircraft when
it is sold.
If the aircraft flunks an annual or 100-hour inspection and the
inspector furnishes the owner a list of defects, that list must be
kept until the defects are repaired and the aircraft is approved
for return to service.
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???

THE END!
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