You are on page 1of 14

POLYMERS BLENDS

Similar to the other raw


materials , e.g. metals it is
principally possible to vary
the properties of
macromolecular
substances by mixing two
or more different polymers
.

OBJECTIVES
1) To provide some design guidelines for
the
development of polymer blends
2 )To illustrate the commercial
significance of
polymer blends

Polymer blends

immiscible
Phase
separatio
n

miscibl
e
Homogenous
to the
molecular
, level
no phase)

Miscibility depends on :
1) hydrophobic
2) hydrophilic
3) Electronegativity
4) polarity

Polymers DONT MIX .


In general, polymers are immiscible unless
there are strongly favorable enthalpic
interactions

Conditions for polymerpolymer miscibility

Gmix H mix TS mix 0

Making Polymers Mix


This presents a challenge to would-be
polymer blenders , To make that
happen, we have to go back to
thefirstlaw of thermodynamics . This
law says that when things change, they
change from a state of more energy to a
state of less energy. Think of it this
way: if you'd like a physics example, a
rock on top of a mountain will roll down
to the bottom of the mountain more
easily than a rock on the bottom will roll
to the top

What first law of


thermodynamics have to do
with blending polymers?
in order to make two polymers
mix, we have to make them
have less energy when mixed
than they would be separate.
Let me use an example to
illustrate. Two polymers that
do actually mix polystyrene +
poly(phenylene oxide).

As you can see, both of these polymers have


aromatic rings. As you may know, aromatic rings like
to stack up like little hexagonal poker chips. For this
reason, these two polymers like to associate with
.each other. So they blend very nicely

Making Your Own Blends


Blends are usually made in two ways
The first way is to dissolve two polymers in the same .
solvent, and then wait for the solvent to evaporate.
When the solvent has all gone away, you'll be left with
a blend at the bottom of your beaker, presuming your
two polymers are miscible .While this method works
fine in the laboratory, it could get expensive if you
tried to do this industrially
..
So for making blends in large amounts, you heat the
two polymers together until you're above the
of both polymers. At thisglass transition temperatures
point they will be nice and gooey, and you can mix
. them together like a cake mix
This is often done in machines such as extruders.
,When your material cools, you'll have a nice blend
.again, presuming your two polymers are miscible

the composition range over which the


two polymers phase-separate isn't
constant. It can change with
temperature. For some polymer pairs
that range gets smaller as
temperature increases. Eventually, if
you heat such a pair high enough,
that range of immiscibility will
become so small that it will
disappear. The temperature at which
this happens is called theupper
critical solution temperatureor UCST.
The graph on the right shows this.
The upside-down parabola is the
boundary between those
temperatures and compositions at
which there is one phase, and those
at which there is phase separation.

Thank
you

REFERENCES
1. IKAWA, T.; ABE, K.; HONDA, K.; AND
TSUCHIDA, E.;J. POLYM. SCI., POLYM. CHEM.
ED., 1975,13, 1505.2. TING, E. P.; PEARCE, E.
M. AND KWEI, T. K.,J. POLYM. SCI. POLYM.
LETT. ED., 1980,18, 201.
3. PEARCE, E. M.; KWEI, T. K. AND MIN, B. Y.,J.
MACROMOL. SCI. CHEM., 1984,21, 1181.
4. COLEMAN, M. M., GRAF, J. F. AND PAINTER, P.
ET AL.,SPECIFIC INTERACTIONS AND THE
MISCIBILITY OF POLYMER BLENDS, TECHNOMIC,
1991, P.20.


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Group names :
Mohammad al-ajarmeh
Mohammad al-atiyat
Mohammad khalil
Mohanad al-khzaala
Mai abudayeh
Maram abuajamiah