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Art P. Magcaling Jr.

Art P. Magcaling Jr.

Assembly Place: PSTC


Quiapo Bldg.
Assembly Time : 0600hour
Departure Time : 0630hour

Training Site :

Brgy Real Calamba


City

Things to Bring:
1. Valid I.D.
2. Registration form
3. Medical Results
4. Extra clothes
5. Lunch or meal stub
6. Drinking water
7. Cotton gloves
8. Long sleeve or cover all
9. Short & slippers/ survival
attire

IMO Model Course

(1.23)

Proficiency in
Survival Craft and
Rescue Boats other
than Fast Rescue
Boats

General
This course
meetsSTCW
Regulation VI/2-1,

Module 1

: Day 01 (0800 1200


hour)
Introduction (Lecture:
0.75 hours)

There areonly
two
actions
that

when
emergency
arises
on
board
their ships.

One is to stop or
eliminate if there is
an

emergencies

and other is to
evacuate, when it
would be
impossible
for
them
to do the former,

to the point when


such emergency
has progress,

that staying
on board
fatal.

will be

This course on module


deals particularly
with the second action
with the use of survival
craft
and rescue boats.

First their preparation,


(lowering
and
hoisting)
during
abandonment
from the
ship,

operation

of
these
crafts
in
the
h2o,

conduct of person on
board,

action that they have


to take up to the time
they are saved or
rescued .

Reference
to this
handout
are
regulation
VI/1 of the

International
Convention of Standard
of Training Certification
and Watchkeeping for
Seafarer 1978 IMO
assembly.

LIFEBOAT AND
LIFERAFT SURVIVAL
MANUALS
COMPLIES WITH
IMO RESOLUTION
A.657 (16) ANNEX 2.

Resolution A-611 (15)


A657 and A660 (16) and
other materials publish ,
not quoted but are
incorporated in this
material in the
importance of their
context to this course

Emergency
situations

1. Carelessness

2. Deliberate
disregard of
safety
rules
and
notices

3. Lack of
knowledge
(i.e. IGNORANCE)
of the persons
duties and
responsibilities

4. Lack of
awareness
of existing
hazards
of the
profession

Emergency
situations
(Lecture: 0.5hours)

A. Types of
Emergency

There are several


situations
arising
@ sea

when the life


saving
appliances
fitted
aboard
ship

will have to be
used for
REAL
other
than
DRILL
purposes.

emergencies
which
may

lead to
abandoning
vessel, such as:

Ship
explosion
or fire
In PORT

Fire @ Sea

Ship collision - is

the structural impact


between
two
ships
or one ship

and a floating or
still object such as
aniceberg.

Ship collisions are of


particular importance in
marine
Someaccidents.
reasons for
the latter are:

The loss of
human life.

The environmental
impact ofoil spills,

especially where
largetanker shipsare
involved.

The financial
consequences
toshipowners,
due to ship loss or
penalties.

Damage to
coastal or offshore
infrastructure, for
example collision
withbridges.

Ship grounding
accident is a type of
marine accident
that involves
the
impact of a
ship
onseabedor

It may result in the


damage of
the submerged
part of
the ships
hull and in

potentially leading to
water ingress,

which
may at
the end compromise
the ship's
structural
integrity,
stability,
and
finally

safety

Shifting of cargoes
jettisoning
of cargoes
@ sea in Port

Financial
consequences to
local communities
close to the
accident.

The vessel would


have

to be abandoned if

Launch
some or
all survival
craft
immediately
to stand by
while fire fighting
continous.

Rescue
boats would have
to be
launched
in the
event of

Rescue

S
U
R
V
I
V
O
R
S

Rescue boats
would have
to be
launched in the
event of m.o.b.

General Alarm

According to SOLAS
chapter III,
regulation 6.4.2
all SOLAS ships,

According to SOLAS chapter III, regulation 6.4.2 all SOLAS ships, that is in this
context all passenger ships and cargo ships over 300GT, shall have "...a
general emergency alarm system complying with the requirements of
paragraph 7.2.1 of" the International Life-Saving Appliance (LSA) Code
adopted by the Maritime Safety Committee of IMO by resolution MSC.48(66)
that again state that "the general emergency alarm system shall be capable
of sounding the general emergency alarm signal consisting of seven or more
short blasts followed by one long blast on the ship's whistle or siren and
additionally on an electrically operated bell or klaxon or other equivalent
horn
signals
that are very relevant:
warning
system".
7 short blasts and 1 long blast-abandon ship
3 long blasts-man overboard
3 short blasts-engines being reversed
3 long 1 short -leaving or arriving at a port
5 long and 1 short blast-dangerous activity, do not interfere!
2 long 3 short blasts-a way of signaling to another vessel when passing
- The "abandon ship" sound signal is surely specific to some Canadian
companies -and probably other too- but is no part of IMO or other official
regulations I could refer to.
- "O" man overboard is indeed an INTERCO signal,
- the three short blasts indeed are part of the COLREGS
- 3 prolonged, 1 short is surely also specific
- 5 long 1 short is specific

The general alarm is


sounded to make
aware the
crew on
board that an
emergency
has occurred.

Abandon Ship Alarm

When the emergency


situation on board
ship goes out of
hands and ship is no
longer safe for crew
on board ship.

The master of the ship


can give a verbal
Abandon ship order,

but this alarm is never


given in ships bell or
whistle.

a verbal order to abandon


ship.

The general
sounded
body
the

alarm is
and every
comes to
emergency

muster
station
where the
master
or his substitute
(chief Officer) gives a
verbal order to abandon

Muster List

Emergency Instructions

(a). The muster list


shall specify details of
the general
emergency alarm
signal prescribed by
(Reg. 50)

and also the


actions to be taken
by the crew &
passengers when
this alarm sounded

b). The
muster list
shall show
the duties
assigned to
the
different
members of
the crew including:

(i) closing
of the
watertight
doors,
fire doors,

Shut-off
valves,

skylights,
portholes

(ii) equipping of
the
other

(iii) preparation
and launching of
survival craft;

(iv) general
preparation of
other
life-saving
appliances;

(v) use of
communication
equipment;

(vi) manning of
fire parties

assigned to deal
with fires; and

(vii) special duties


assigned in respect of
the use of fire-fighting
equipment and
installations;

(c). show the duties


assigned to members
of the crew in
relation to
passengers in case of
an emergency, which
shall include-

END OF
MODULE 1