Old Testament

Week 18: Isaiah (part 1 of 5) Introduction and chapters 1–6

Hurricane Utah Adult Religion Class

Isaiah schedule
• • • • • • • 2/27: Intro & Isaiah 1–6. 3/6: Isaiah 7–12. 3/13: Break. 3/20: Isaiah 13–39. 3/27: Isaiah 40–55. 4/3: Break. 4/10: Isaiah 56–66.
2

The most-quoted prophet
• 142 quotations or allusions in the NT.
 47× in the Gospels.
• 8× by Jesus himself.

• One complete copy of Isaiah, one 75% complete, and numerous fragments in the DSS. • 1/3 of Isaiah in the BofM. • Quoted over 4,000× by Church leaders in modern times.
3

“Great Isaiah Scroll” (1QIsaa)
24½ feet long. 10½ inches tall. 17 pieces of sheepskin stitched together. Written ~100 B.C. Discovered A.D. 1947.

4

The most-quoted prophet
• 142 quotations or allusions in the NT.
 47× in the Gospels.
• 8× by Jesus himself.

• One complete copy of Isaiah, one 75% complete, and numerous fragments in the DSS. • 1/3 of Isaiah in the BofM. • Quoted over 4,000× by Church leaders in modern times.
5

Isaiah as “required reading”
• Mormon 8:22–23. • 3 Nephi 23:1.

6

What’s so important about Isaiah?
• He saw the Redeemer (2 Nephi 11:2). • His writings “persuade [others] to believe in the Lord their Redeemer” (1 Nephi 19:23). • We should liken Isaiah’s words unto ourselves (1 Nephi 19:23).

7

Understanding Isaiah
• Nephi’s 4 keys to understanding Isaiah:
 2 Nephi 25:1: Learn “the manner of prophesying among the Jews.”  2 Nephi 25:4: Be “filled with the spirit of prophecy.”  2 Nephi 25:6: Become familiar with “the regions round about” Jerusalem.  2 Nephi 25:8: Live in the last days.

• Isaiah in modern English.
8

Biography of Isaiah
• ‫( ישציהו‬yesh-ah-yaw’) =
• • • • “Jehovah has saved / delivered” Prophet of Judah (southern kingdom). “Professional prophet.” Born c. 760 B.C. Prophesied 740–701.
    King King King King Uzziah (reigned 791–740). Jotham (751–732). Ahaz (736–716). Hezekiah (729–687).
9

Biography of Isaiah
• Two periods of ministry:
 First ministry (740–732).  Withdrawal from public life? (732–716).  Second ministry (716–701).

• Died 681, at age 79 (?).

10

11

12

13

Unity of Isaiah
Isaiah’s message to people in the:

Chapters: Written by: 1–39 First Isaiah Late 8th century (Proto-Isaiah) (740–700 B.C.): Assyrians 40–55 Late 7th and early 6th centuries (625–575 B.C.): Babylonians 56–66 Late 6th century (540–500 B.C.): Persians Second Isaiah (Deutero-Isaiah)
Third Isaiah (Trito-Isaiah)
14

Deutero-Isaiah and the Book of Mormon
• Isaiah on the brass plates (c. 598 B.C.). • Therefore, Second Isaiah largely written before 598. • Third Isaiah not in the Book of Mormon.

15

Who wrote the book of Isaiah?
“What we have in Isaiah is a lot of genuine words of the prophet intermingled with other stuff by his well-meaning followers. Every chapter, including those in Deutero- and TritoIsaiah, contains genuine words of Isaiah and every chapter, including all those in the early part of the book, contains words that are not his.” —Hugh Nibley, Since Cumorah, 1967

16

Isaiah 6:1
In the year that king Uzziah died I saw also the Lord sitting upon a throne, high and lifted up, and his train filled the temple. • 740 B.C. • Throne theophany. • Temple setting.

17

Isaiah 6:2
Above it stood the seraphims: each one had six wings; with twain he covered his face, and with twain he covered his feet, and with twain he did fly. • Seraph = “burning one.” • Poisonous snakes? • Three sets of wings symbolic: power, humility, modesty.

18

Isaiah 6:3
And one cried unto another, and said, Holy, holy, holy, is the LORD of hosts: the whole earth is full of his glory. • “Holy” = sacred, consecrated, dedicated, set apart.

19

Isaiah 6:4
And the posts of the door moved at the voice of him that cried, and the house was filled with smoke. • Altar of incense.

20

Isaiah 6:5
Then said I, Woe is me! • “Woe” = grief, for I am undone; lamentation. because I am a man of • “Undone” = cut off, unclean lips, and I destroyed. dwell in the midst of a people of unclean lips: for mine eyes have seen the King, the LORD of hosts.

21

Isaiah 6:6–7
Then flew one of the seraphims unto me, having a live coal in his hand, which he had taken with the tongs from off the altar: And he laid it upon my mouth, and said, Lo, this hath touched thy lips; and thine iniquity is taken away, and thy sin purged.
22

Isaiah 6:8
Also I heard the voice • “Us” = heavenly of the Lord, saying, council. Whom shall I send, and • Compare who will go for us? Then Abraham 3:27. said I, Here am I; send me.

23

Isaiah 6:9–10
And he said, Go, and tell this people, Hear ye indeed, but understand not; and see ye indeed, but perceive not. Make the heart of this people fat, and make their ears heavy, and shut their eyes; lest they see with their eyes, and hear with their ears, and understand with their heart, and convert, and be healed.

• The Lord is sarcastic. • Chiasm: Heart Ears Eyes Eyes Ears Heart

24

Isaiah 6:11–12
Then said I, Lord, how long? And he answered, Until the cities be wasted without inhabitant, and the houses without man, and the land be utterly desolate, And the Lord have removed men far away, and there be a great forsaking in the midst of the land. • Assyrian captivity of Israel in 722 B.C. • Babylonian captivity of Judah in 587 B.C.

25

Isaiah 6:13
But yet in it shall be a tenth and it shall return and shall be eaten: as a teil tree and as an oak whose substance is in them when they cast their leaves: so the holy seed shall be the substance thereof. • Only 10% remain; even they are destroyed.

26

Isaiah 1
• Isaiah’s introductory poem. • An indictment of Israel. • 1:10–20: A call to repentance and cleanliness.

27

Isaiah 2:1–5
• “Concerning Judah and Jerusalem.” • “And let them…flee unto Jerusalem, unto the mountains of the Lord's house” (D&C 133:13). • “[Mount] Zion” = Jerusalem. • Yet to be fulfilled. • The Salt Lake Temple as a type or shadow.
28

29

30

Isaiah 2:1–5
• “Concerning Judah and Jerusalem.” • “And let them…flee unto Jerusalem, unto the mountains of the Lord's house” (D&C 133:13). • “[Mount] Zion” = Jerusalem. • Yet to be fulfilled. • The Salt Lake Temple as a type or shadow.
31

Isaiah 2:6–4:6
• Before the Jerusalem Temple can be rebuilt, the people must be humbled (e.g., Isaiah 2:11). • Dire conditions after Jerusalem is destroyed (Isaiah 4:1).

32

Isaiah 5:1–7
• “A love song gone sour.” • Symbols:
 Vineyard on a fertile hill (5:1).  Choice vines (5:2).  Edible grapes and sour grapes (5:2).

33

Next week:
Isaiah 7–12

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful

Master Your Semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Special offer for students: Only $4.99/month.

Master Your Semester with a Special Offer from Scribd & The New York Times

Cancel anytime.