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Principals

Make the
Introductory
Difference
Meeting
Danny Bryan School
Improvement
dbryanec@yahoo.com Resource
Center

214-491-7703
Principals
Principals New to Campus
Principals New to District
Principals New to Campus &
District
Excited to be
July 3, 2006
Dear Principal:
Title I schools that do not meet AYP for two consecutive
years in either reading, math, graduation rate and/or
attendance enter the Title I School Improvement
Program (SIP) as mandated by No Child Left Behind.
AYP data indicates that your campus may enter the Title
I School Improvement Program. The purpose of this
letter is to inform you of some of the SIP requirements
and associated dates in the event that your school does
move into school improvement.
Introductory Meetings

Principals of schools in the School Improvement Program (SIP)


are required to attend the meeting scheduled for their region.

School
Improvement
Resource
Center
Principal One Principal Two

Staff, Students Can’t Mistake, Not My Fault


Principal Three

School
Improvement
Resource
Why Do You Have Center
Such a Positive
Attitude?
"Most folks
are about as
happy as
they make
up their
minds to
be."
1/2 Abraham Lincoln
Lou
Holtz

“Life is ten percent what


happens to you, and
ninety percent how you
Cesar Millan is often called the Dr.
Phil for dogs. But therapy doesn't stop
with the pets. Cesar often has to re- The
train the dogs' owners to be more difference
effective leaders for their between a
furry friends.
good dog
and a bad
dog is the
owner!
Reasons for Having Such a
Positive Attitude?
Great Opportunity
Career Maker
A Chance to Shine
Make a Difference for Kids
Best School for Me!

WHY?
Royal's teams won three
national championships,
posted a 167-47-5 record
and won 11 Cotton Bowl
appearances.
He accepted a challenging five-year
contract in Wisconsin as the general
manager and head coach of perpetual
losers the Green Bay Packers.

During his 16 year reign as


head coach, Barry Switzer
compiled a 157-29-4 record
with a winning percentage
of .837. This mark ranks Led Bruins to 10 national
him fourth all-time among championships, including seven in a
college coaches row (1966-73) 88 consecutive victories
Success is Dependent on
Leadership
The Most Important Person
Strong Leadership + Average Staff = High
Achievement
Average Leadership + Strong Staff = Average
Achievement
Average Leadership + Average Staff = Poor
Achievement

Princip
al
Dr. William Sanders
University Tennessee
The Most Important Person
A Team is Reflective of the Personality
of the Coach
A School is Reflective of the Personality
of the Principal
Influence
Authority to Make Decisions
Control Budget
Responsibility for School Improvement
Princip
al
Dr. William Sanders
University Tennessee
If This Is True!

Huge
Responsibil
ity
I Have a Plan!
School Success is
Dependent on
Why Do Schools Miss
AYP?
No Vision, No or Poor Plan Action
Lack of Instructional Leadership
Misaligned Curriculum
Use of Non-effective Instructional
Strategies
Lack of Appropriate Rigor School
Improvement
Unwillingness to Change Resource

Attack These Issues!


Center
Success is Dependent on
StartLeadership
With Myself
Create Time for Instructional Leadership
Focus on Student Learning
Develop Parental Confidence
Life-Long Learning for All
School
Improvement

Through a 5-Step Resource


Center

Plan
A very good book about Leadership
Success is Dependent on
“I believe leadership is
Leadership
largely learned. Not
everyone can lead, nor is
every leader destined for
glory, but most of us have
a potential far beyond
what we think possible.”
1/3 John Wooden
Success is Dependent on
“Those who aspire to
Leadership
be leaders can do it;
those who wish to
become much better
leaders can also do it.”
2/3 John Wooden
Success is Dependent on
“The best leaders
Leadership are
lifelong learners; they
take measures to create
organizations that foster
and inspire learning
3/3
throughout.”
John Wooden
Many Leadership Characteristics Can Be Learned!

What Works in Schools – Robert Marzano


100 Ways to Motivate Others – Steve Chandler
Leadership Engine – Noel Tichy Educational
One Minute Manager – Ken Blanchard Military
Wooden on Leadership – John Wooden Sports
Seven Steps to Effective Instructional Leadership –
Dr Elaine McEwan
The Learning-Centered Principal – Rick DuFour School
Leadership That Works – Rick DuFour Improvement
Resource
Classroom Instruction – Robert Marzano
Center
The 8th Habit – Stephen Covey
Good to Great – Jim Collins
Success is Dependent on
StartLeadership
With Myself
Create Time for Instructional Leadership
Focus on Student Learning
Develop Parental Confidence
Life-Long Learning for All
School
Improvement

5-Step Plan Resource


Center
Personal Attributes
Start With



Myself
Passion (Maxwell)
Enthusiasm
Character/Values
• Work Ethic
• Self-discipline
• Loyalty
• Intent
• Poise
• Common Sense/Good Judgment
• Competitive Greatness
Success is Dependent on
“A great leader’s
Leadership
courage to fulfill his
vision comes from
passion, not
position.”
1/1 John C.
Personal Attributes
Start With



Myself
Passion
Enthusiasm
Character/Values (Be the example)
• Work Ethic
• Self-discipline
• Loyalty
• Intent
• Poise
• Common Sense/Good Judgment
• Competitive Greatness
Start With
Professionalism!

Myself
1) Professional Image (actions, attire)
2) Role Model
3) Community Icon
1) Students, parents, staff, community
• Given respect by position
• Maintain and develop respect by
actions
• Consistent, positive actions
generates trust
“In the absence of
Garland McMeans Story leadership, leadership
High Self Expectations will emerge.”
Personal Attributes
Start With



Myself
Passion
Enthusiasm
Character/Values
• Work Ethic
• Self-discipline
• Loyalty
• Intent (Confidence/Peale)
• Poise
• Common Sense/Good Judgment
• Competitive Greatness
“When you see a
Success is Dependent on
problem coming down
Leadership
the road, holler
“Hello, Problem!
Where have you
been? I’ve been
training
1/1 for you
Dr. Norman
all my
Believe in Yourself
Think Positive
Staff is a Reflection of the Leader
Expect the Most Out of
Yourself
Believe and Say Good Things
About Yourself – It’s going to
happen
Going to Make Myself Have a
Good Day
Don’t Ignore Problems There is a
Solution
My Evaluator’s Perception
Personal Attributes
Start With
Myself
“The heart of a leader”
• Passion
• Enthusiasm Leading with Soul
• Character/Values Bolman & Deal
• Work Ethic
• Self-discipline
• Loyalty
• Intent
• Poise
• Common Sense/Good Judgment
• Competitive Greatness
What Do I Really Believe?
Start With
Myself
By answering a few
questions, the principal
will identify the key
components that will
help develop and guide
his/her vision and all
decisions regarding
“In the absence of
campus leadership.
leadership, leadership
will emerge.”
Success is Dependent on
Leadership
I Have a Large Staff I
Delegate Everything!
You Can’t Delegate Direction!

Areas That Are Delegated


School

You Must Monitor Improvement


Resource

To Monitor You Must Have


Center
a
Working Knowledge
Get Over Being Principal
No cussing, dirty jokes
Big desk – big office
No drinking with staff
Closed-door meetings
Professionally focused
Being asked questions
Parents wanting to see me What Do I Want
Going to functions as principal
Our School to
Going to central meetings
Become?
What’s the
Vision?
What Do I
learning?

2. All students can learn?

3. Teachers make a difference?

4. Every student and staff member


deserves a safe and supportive
learning environment?

5. High learning expectations and


high standards for all?

6. Lifelong learning for self and for


7. Involve others in the decision-
making process?

8. Two-way communication with


students, parents, staff, and
community members?

9. Ongoing collection, analysis and


utilization of data?

10. Professional development is key to


school improvement?

11. Willing to take risks to improve


Success is Dependent on
StartLeadership
With Myself
Create and Articulate a Vision

School
Improvement
Resource
Center
People Should Be Able to
Articulate
Develop a Vision (Big Picture)
People Hunger for a Higher
Purpose
People Want to be a Part of a
Vision
People Work Harder and Longer
Airplane Factory Workers

Tap into Their Special Energy By


Showing Significance of What They
Communicate That Vision
Through Expectations
Basic Guidelines in Place for Staff
(handbooks – procedures –
guidelines.) SYSTEMS

District/Campus Goals

Understanding the “Focus of the


Building”
Thinking About Vision - geese
Lessons From Geese

Milton Olson
Fact 1

As each goose flaps its wings, it


creates an uplift for others
behind it. There is 71% more
flying range in V-formation
than in flying alone.

Milton Olson
Lesson
1

“People who share a common


direction and sense of purpose
can get there more quickly.”
Fact 2

Whenever a goose flies out of


formation, it feels drag and
tries to get back into position.
Lesson
2

“It’s harder to do something


alone than together.”
Fact 3

When the lead goose gets tired,


it rotates back into formation
and another goose flies at the
head.
Lesson
3

“Shared leadership and


interdependence give us each a
chance to lead as well an
opportunity to rest.”
Fact 4

The geese flying in the rear of


the formation honk to
encourage those up front to
keep up their speed.
Lesson
4

“Encouragement is motivating.
We need to make sure our
“honking” is encouraging-and
not discouraging.”
Fact 5

When a goose gets sick or


wounded and falls, two geese
fall out and stay with it until it
revives or dies. Then they catch
up or join another flock.
Lesson
5

“We may all need help from time


to time. We should stand by our
colleagues in difficult times.”
Success is Dependent on
StartLeadership
With Myself
Create and Articulate a Vision
Develop a Sense of Urgency

School
Improvement
Resource
Center
TAKS/AYP Standards Comparison
AYP (Federal) 2007 2008 2009 2010
Reading/ELA 60% 60% 67% 73%
Math 50% 50% 58% 67%

2007 2008 2009 2010


TAKS (State) AA/Re/Ex AA/Re/Ex AA/Re/Ex AA/Re/Ex
R/ELA, W, SS 65/75/90 65/75/90 70/80/90 70/80/90
Math 45/75/90 50/75/90 55/80/90 60/80/90
Science 40/75/90 45/75/90 50/80/90 55/80/90

Staff Needs to Understand


Accountability Measures.
Staff Needs to Understand Stages of
Improvement.

Sense of Urgency About


Face Reality
Do Teachers
Know Their Data
Do Kids Know
Their Data
Share the Data
We Are Not As Good As We Should Be!
Teach Staff to Research & Understand Data

Discover Areas of Need (Working, not


working)
Do You Know the Data? – “3, 5, 35 failures”

Engrain in Staff that Our Goal is 100%


Mastery for ALL Students
Focus on “Passion” to be the Very Best.
Success is Dependent on
Leadership
Class Schedule for
Superintendent’s
Kids School

Which Students Improvement


Resource

Deserve Our Center

Best Effort?
Success is Dependent on
StartLeadership
With Myself
Create Time for Instructional Leadership
Focus on Student Learning
Develop Parental Confidence
Life-Long Learning for All
School
Improvement

5-Step Plan Resource


Center
How Do You Spend Your
Time?

Research conducted by J.H. Stronge in


an article entitled “A position in
transition?” suggests that on an
average only one-tenth of a principals
time is devoted to instructional
What is Instructional
Leadership?
Instructional Leadership are those
actions that a principal takes or
delegates to others to promote growth
in student learning.

Such as: setting clear goals, allocating


appropriate resources for instruction,
managing the curriculum, monitoring
instruction, analyzing data and
evaluating teachers. B. Flath
“The principal as instructional
Manager versus
Instructional Leader!
Managers: Spend MOST of their
time working with administrative
details. Moving from crisis to crisis
putting out fires never in control of
their own time. (Managers
work in the system.)
Instructional Leaders: Spend
MOST of their time working with
teaching and learning. (Instructional
Leaders work on the system.)
Success is Dependent on
Leadership
Create Time for Instructional Leadership
Communication/Organization
Procedures/Rules/Guidelines
(systems)
High Expectations
School
Improvement

How Do I Work on Resource


Center

the System?
Pro-active Planning
Communication/Organization
Responsibility Make Information Accessible
Behavior
Communicate in Writing each week
with Each Staff Member
Communicate Verbally with Leadership
Groups
Rules, Guidelines & Procedures
Delegate & Monitor Expectations
Communication
Effective Internal
Communication
is a prerequisite to
Effective External
Communication
Parent asks several staff
members the same
question
WE WANT THE SAME OR SIMILAR
RESPONSE COMMUNICATED!
Internal Communications
Written and Verbal – “Bark” & Calendar

Position All Staff to be in the


“Know”!
Teachers Team
Leaders

Information
&
Accessibility
Dept Chairs Teachers
Support
Staff
Information is POWER!
North High School
Each week Bulldog Bark!
August 15, 2003

Before you can be viewed as a professional you must first demonstrate professionalism.

Bulldog Bark
The purpose of the Bulldog Bark is to provide to you a concise reminder of information that is needed for you to be
able to effectively function in the North High School environment. Each Friday you will receive a Bulldog Bark in
your teacher mailbox. It will be 3-holed punched so that it can be placed in your communication binder. This will
Notes From Principal

allow you to be able to refer to previous editions for needed information. The Bulldog Bark will also be placed on
the school’s shared drive as an archive. ALL TEACHERS CAN READ AND ARE EXPECTED TO DO SO.
The Bulldog Bark will be how you will find out and remember major information through the year. Keep it and
more importantly READ IT.

Rather than receiving 25 e-mails from me during the week – you’ll receive the Weekly Bulldog Bark! Easier to keep
up with information that way.

Using the Bulldog Bark


Staff members may submit information to be included in the weekly Bulldog Bark. If you have information that
needs to be shared with all staff members this is a great way to do it. Send your information to Mary Holley no later
than Thursday noon of the week you’d like information included. The Bulldog Bark is finalized on Thursday
afternoons ready for print and distribution Friday mornings.

Daily Announcements
Each day at the beginning of Period 3/7 a time is designated for announcements and short communication items.
This is a critical time for the school to be able to effectively communicate to students. If you have announcements
that would like to have scrolling during the day here’s the process.

Please e-mail announcements at least 24 hours in advanced to ntv@mckinneyisd.net. Announcements will be


updated daily on the scrolling announcements during 2nd/6th period every day. The following format should be
applied:

Club/Group/Organization Name – Sponsor Name (in case we have any questions)


Announcement (make sure to include times and dates of events)
Date you would like the announcement to begin and end
Meet with Leadership
Groups
Principals/Counselors
Leadership Team
Campus Improvement Team
Department Chairs
Team Leaders
PTO President
Campus Liaison (various)
Cheerleader Guidelines – Professional Development
Developing
Pervasive Influence
Leaders
I’m sounding like Danny
Bryan! (Oberlin)
How would Danny answer
that question? (Janie)
Teachers and parents can
Turn Your Info into Vena or Danny
get results!
Long & Perry Cheerleaders
How Do We Work on
System
Communication/Organization
What Can Be Put in
Writing Before
School Starts?
That will answer questions before
they are asked.
That will help put out
unnecessary fires and will
free-up time for you to spend
on instructional issues.
Why Pro-Active Planning?
Eliminates Problems Before They Occur
Eliminate a lot of unnecessary fires
Available 24/7
Empowers staff and students
Avoid answering the same questions over
& over
Eliminate the answers being different
Establish expectations
Hold people accountable
Answer questions before they are asked
Free up time for the most important things
Tool by which to teach others
Communicate Vision
Through Expectations
Basic Guidelines in Place for Staff
(handbooks – procedures –
guidelines.) SYSTEMS

District/Campus Goals

Understanding the “Focus of the


Building”
Pervasive Influence
   
Student
Discipline Expectations and
& Faculty
ocedures
Teachers by door
Handbooks
Tardy Policy Instructional Focus
Responsibility (conduct) versus Behavior Instructional Philosophy or
scipline) Focus
ISS Procedures and Guidelines Expected Lesson Design
Grading Issues What is an Effective
Classrooms
Summative and Formative grades weight
each How to utilize planning time
Is there a specific number of sum./form. Documentation of what
ades required should
Are zeros allowed? be taught each six weeks
using
Can a final grade be above 100 or below
? district curriculum
How much grade weight does homework
ry? Monitoring Plan for Students
Who Fail
How is Incomplete Daily Work handled?
Can a teacher assign a 69 as a final grade Assessments and
How is make-up work handled Interventions
Retest, re-teach guidelines and grading Pyramid of Interventions
Expectations for tutoring Utilizing Data to Drive
Student Movement Instruction
Teaching to the SEL
Eliminate the Same
Questions & Issues Being
Asked Each Year
In-service & Early Release Days
Faculty Meeting Days
(Mean What You Say)
Faculty Attire
Student Placed Outside Class
Communication Expectations
All staff members are responsible for information contained in the teacher and student
handbook, weekly bulletin, special memos, minutes from PTA meetings, department,
grade level, or team meetings, as well as other written documentation presented to
teachers.
“All Teachers Can Read”

Therefore, teachers will be expected to do so! This expectation will be instrumental in


having the ability to present instructional in-service information as opposed to
administrative in-service information to teacher during faculty meetings.
Communication
Binder
• Weekly Bulletin • Faculty Handbook
• Department Meeting• Crisis Plan
Notes
• Staff Presentations
• Team Meeting Notes
• Staff Schedules
• Morning
Announcements • Lesson Plan Forms
• Student Handbook • Staff Phone Tree
• Faculty Meeting Notes
• Birthday Lists
• Extra-curricular • Discussion Group
Schedules Notes
• Staff Presentations • PTA Newsletter
• Bell Schedules
Systems in
• Campus Goals
Make as Much
Planning Calendar
Information Available as

Possible - 24/7
Info Dowell Middle School
• Info
• Info

301 Ridge Road


McKinney, Texas 75070

Phone: 972-569-6500 Web Site: http://www.mckinneyisd.net/dowell/ FAX: 972-569-6506

Parent/Student Handbook Supplement and School Calendar

2003-2004
School-Wide Calendar
    Assessment Dates/Study Dates
State & Local Testing & Benchmark Dates and
ndows
Nine Weeks, Six Weeks Tests – Department
Special Assemblies
nchmarks
MADD
SAT, ACT, PSAT, CoGAT
Professional Development Schedules
    District Dates
Time with Administrative Staff
Back to School Nights
Time with counselors,
8th grade Parent Night
librarian
Open House
Time with department chairs,
Grades Due
CIP
Report Cards & Progress Reports Go Home
Instructional Meetings (SEL)
Feeder School Important Dates (to avoid
Instructional Review Sessions
nflict)
Create Schedules
    UIL Dates (athletic & academic)First of May
PDAS Evaluations
    Special Dates
UIL Eligibility Schedule
NHS Induction & Deadlines for Applications
Announcement Schedule
Award Nights & Days
Administrative Duty Schedule
Dances
Duty/Lunch Detention/Sat
Plays
School Meeting Schedules
Extra-curricular Activities
Principals, Counselors
Choir/Band Concerts
Central Office Meetings
PTA Meetings & Special Activities
Dept Meetings, PTA, CIP
Pep Rallies
Team Meetings
Fundraisers – Dates Yearbooks will be sold
Assessment Review
Picture Dates and Re-takes
Faculty (consistent day)
Cheer-leader Try-outs
 
Homecoming
Field Trips – Science/College Day Department
Dowell Middle School
Welcome to Dowell Middle School. TAAS Results 2002 2001 2000 1999 Students will receive progress reports on the
following dates. Progress Reports are given to
Dowell Middle School is a sixth, seventh, and 6th Grade Reading 97 95 90 87 students to take home at the 3-week mark and
eighth grade school housing approximately 1208 6th Grade Math 99 97 92 90 mailed at the 6-week point!
middle school students. Dowell is located in the
western portion of the McKinney Independent
7th Grade Reading 97 94 89 90 September 10 (Sent Home with Student)
School District, south of Virginia Parkway on
7th Grade Math 98 95 95 88 September 11 (Returned Signed)
Ridge Road. Ninety-eight staff members are September 27 (Mailed)
assigned to our campus that work daily with your November 12 (Sent Home with Student)
children in a vast array of capacities. 8th Grade Reading 98 95 94 88
November 13 (Returned Signed)
8th Grade Math 98 96 95 85 December 9 (Mailed)
The middle school years are unique and special. 8th Grade Writing 94 92 89 84 February 12 (Sent Home with Student)
Emotionally and educationally, students are “in 8th Grade Science 95 98 93 87 February 13 (Returned Signed)
the middle”. The middle school years should 8th Grade S. Studies 91 91 81 75 February 28 (Mailed)
“bridge the gap” between the elementary years of
April 15 (Sent Home with Student)
structure and close supervision and the high
Important Dates To Remember April 16 (Returned Signed)
school years of intense study and demands of May 9 (Mailed)
preparing for adulthood.
August 26 – PTO Meeting 7:00 p.m. followed by
For this reason, the academic program at Dowell Meet the 7th & 8th GradeTeacher Night 7:15 p.m.
Middle School incorporates a variety of unique
instructional strategies and techniques aimed at August 27 – PTO Meeting 7:00 p.m. followed by Report Cards will be sent home
addressing the needs of the middle school child. Meet the 6th GradeTeacher Night 7:15 p.m. on the following days.
A few of these strategies include: double blocks
for language arts and math classes, academic
September 6 – PTO Welcome Coffee October 25, 2002 (Sent Home with Student0
teaming, extended blocks of time, a wide selection January 27, 2003 (Sent Home with Student)
of elective offerings with an emphasis on For New Parents to Dowell 9:00 a.m.
March 28, 2003 (Sent Home with Student)
technology and the development of career
June 12, 2003 (Mailed)
decision-making skills, while creating vast November 12 – PTO Parent Meeting 7:00 p.m.
opportunities for extracurricular, special program,
and club activities. PTO Mane
January 14 – Aim for Success Parent Meeting 7:00 p.m.
Minutes
Dowell Middle School’s success is due largely in Newsletter distributed to
March 13 – Open House 7:00 p.m.
part to the high parental involvement Articles due! students!!
demonstrated by the Dowell Community. Parents
are encouraged to get involved in the Dowell PTO April 1 – NJHS Induction 7:00 p.m.
August 13 August 22 & 23
and to volunteer at the school on a regular basis. September 18 September 26
There are many opportunities in which you can April 8 – Principal’s Coffee 9:00 a.m.
October 22 October 31
serve. We need your help! PTO Officer Elections
November 19 December 3
January 22 January 31
Once again, welcome to the Dowell Middle May 1 – 5th Grade Parent Night 7:00 p.m.
School Community. February 19 February 27
March 26 April 3
May 6 – 6th & 7th Grade Parent Meeting 7:00 p.m.
Danny Bryan April 23 May 5
For Registration Information 2002-2003

May 23 – 8th Grade Walk 9:00 a.m.


Dowell Football Schedule - 2002
th
7 Grade 8th Grade
Date Opponent Place Time Date Opponent Place Time

Sept 4 Frisco Wester There 5:30 p.m. Sept 3 Frisco Wester Home 5:30 p.m.
Sept 10 Allen Ford Home 5:30 p.m. Sept 10 Allen Ford There 5:30 p.m.
Sept 17 Sherman Piner Home 5:30 p.m. Sept 17 Sherman Piner There 5:30 p.m.
Sept 24 Allen Curtis There 5:30 p.m. Sept 24 Allen Curtis Home 5:30 p.m.
Oct 1 Bye Oct 1 Bye
Oct 7 Frisco Pioneer There 5:30 p.m. Oct 8 Frisco Pioneer Home 5:30 p.m.
Oct 15 Frisco Clark Home 5:30 p.m. Oct 15 Frisco Clark There 5:30 p.m.
Oct 22 Frisco Staley There 5:30 p.m. Oct 22 Frisco Staley Home 5:30 p.m.
Oct 29 Faubion There 5:30 p.m. Oct 29 Faubion Home 5:30 p.m.
Nov 5 J ohnson Home 5:30 p.m. Nov 5 J ohnson There 5:30 p.m.

Dowell Volleyball Schedule - 2002


th
7 Grade 8th Grade
Date Opponent Place Time Date Opponent Place Time

Aug 29 Frisco Wester There 5:30 p.m. Aug 29 Frisco Wester Home 5:30 p.m.
Sept 5 Allen Ford Home 5:30 p.m. Sept 5 Allen Ford There 5:30 p.m.
Sept 12 Sherman Piner Home 5:30 p.m. Sept 12 Sherman Piner There 5:30 p.m.
Sept 16 Allen Curtis There 5:30 p.m. Sept 16 Allen Curtis Home 5:30 p.m.
Oct 3 Frisco Pioneer There 5:30 p.m. Oct 3 Frisco Pioneer Home 5:30 p.m.
Oct 5 Allen “A” Allen TBA Oct 5 Allen “A” Allen TBA
Tournament Tournament
Oct 10 Frisco Clark Home 5:30 p.m. Oct 10 Frisco Clark There 5:30 p.m.
Oct 17 Frisco Staley There 5:30 p.m. Oct 17 Frisco Staley Home 5:30 p.m.
Oct 24 Faubion There 5:30 p.m. Oct 24 Faubion Home 5:30 p.m.
Oct 28 J ohnson Home 5:30 p.m. Oct 28 J ohnson There 5:30 p.m.
Oct 31 District Oct 31 District
Nov 1, 2 Tournament J ohnson TBA Nov 1, 2 Tournament Faubion TBA
   

                   
It’s not necessarily the amount of time 
you spend at practice that counts; it’s 
what you put into the practice. 

           OCTOBER 
 
Eric Lindros 

SUNDAY  MONDAY  TUESDAY  WEDNESDAY  THURSDAY  FRIDAY  SATURDAY 


    1  2  3  4  5 
    Band Hot Dog Social   
th   th    
7  & 8  Volleyball 
th th
  PTO Board Meeting  6  Grade            th 7  & 8  Cross Country 
9:00 a.m.  Rotation Change   
th
Health Screening    7  Volleyball 
Oct 1­4  Tournament @ Allen 
6  7  8  9  10  11  12 
   
th
 
th
    th    
th th
7  Football  8  Football  Band at High School  7  & 8  Cross Country 
 
th
    Pep Rally! 
7  & 8  Volleyball 
Football Game   
th  
6  Grade Choir Concert  Choir Cluster Concert   
7:00 p.m.  @ First Baptist          
Fire Prevention Week  7:00 p.m. 
13  14  15  16  17  18  19 
   
Columbus Day 
 
th th
   
th th
   

   
7  & 8  Football 
Hispanic Heritage 
  7  & 8  Volleyball 
st
End of 1  9 Weeks 
Staff Development Day! 
No School for Students   
7/8 Grade Choir  UIL Eligibility      
  Concert 7:00 p.m. 
Brown Bag Lunch in 
Grade Check 
 
Library 11:00 a.m.  MHS Homecoming! 
20  21  22  23  24  25  26 
      th     th    
  Holiday No School!  th
7  & 8  Football  Student Group &  th
7  & 8  Volleyball  Report Cards Given to  McKinney Making a        
    nd
Begin 2  9 Weeks  Organizations Photos  Students!  Difference Day! 
Red Ribbon Week      with Blunck’s 
    Red Ribbon Rally    
   
Oct 23­31  PTO Newsletter       8:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. 
Articles Due! 
27  28  29  30  31      
   
th th   th  
Daylight Savings     7  & 8  Volleyball  th Blunck’s Student  PTO Newsletters Go 
7  & 8  Football 
Time Change    Picture Retakes     Home Grades 6, 7 & 8 
 
(Fall Backwards)  Yearbook Sale Week    During Lunch  
Pep Rally!  th th
Oct. 28­Nov 1  7  & 8  Volleyball 
   
 
District Tournament 
th
8  Grade Career    
Inventory Testing 
Window Oct 28­31 
   

                   
 
Grief and tragedy and hatred are only 
for a time. Goodness, remembrance and 

         FEBRUARY 
love have no end. 
 
President George W. Bush 
SUNDAY  MONDAY  TUESDAY  WEDNESDAY  THURSDAY  FRIDAY  SATURDAY 
           
 

           
 
All Region Choir 
         Auditions 
  National Black    
  History Month 

2  3  4  5  6  7  8 
   
th
PTO Board Meeting     
th
   
7  Boys Basketball  9:00 a.m.   NJHS Meeting          8  Boys Basketball 
  3:40 p.m. Library    
   
8  Girls Basketball    
th th th
7  Girls Basketball    8  Grade Academic 
    Honor Reception     
  Feb 3­7 School  7:00 p.m. 
Counselor’s Week   NJHS Meeting         
7:50 a.m. Library 
9  10  11  12  13  14  15 
   
th
7  Boys Basketball 
    
Black History Luncheon  Lincoln’s Birthday! 
 
Progress Reports 
 
NJHS Applications 
 

  th
7  Girls Basketball     11:00 a.m. Library    Returned Signed  Due!   
th th
Progress Reports Given  8  Boys Basketball   
    7  Grade Academic 
to Students! 
th
8  Girls Basketball     Valentine’s Day 
Pep Rally!  Honor Reception     
  7:00 p.m.  
   
16  17  18  19  20  21  22 
  Professional   
th
       
Development Day!  8  Boys Basketball  PTO Newsletter   Boys & Girls   Boys & Girls   Boys & Girls  
Basketball Tournament  Basketball Tournament  Basketball Tournament  
th
Student Holiday  8  Girls Basketball     Articles Due! 
th th
President’s Day  7  & 8  Grade           
th
7  Boys Basketball  All Region Choir        
   
th
Washington’s Birthday 
7  Girls Basketball   Pre­Rehersal 
23  24  25  26  27  28   
     
th    
th
Winter Dance          
 
  6  Grade Academic  8  Grade AIMS  Grades 7 & 8 Only 
    Honor Reception        Program  7 – 10 p.m. 
th
  
7:00 p.m.   MISD Band  8  Grade AIMS 
   
th
Solo/Ensemble  Program 
  7  Grade TAKS 
Writing 
PTO Newsletters Go 
Home Grades 6, 7 & 8 
Progress Reports 
Mailed 
Tutorials!
STUDENT INSTRUCTION All students may attend tutorials for enrichment purposes. Any student who
Bell Schedule is failing a class (70 or below) will have the opportunity to attend tutoring in
7:30 a.m. – Cafeteria opens - All students report to the cafeteria. that area. It is recommended that students whose grade average is 76 or
7:55 a.m. – Students may go to lockers for materials. lower consider tutorials for remediation purposes to prevent their grade from
th
6 grade students report to the gym. dropping any lower.
8:00 a.m. – Tutorials begin.
8:05 a.m. – No entry to tutoring area without pass. Tutorials will be provided at 8:00 a.m. each morning based on the following
8:24 a.m. – Tutorials end. schedule:
8:27 a.m. – Warning bell. Language Arts & Science - Mondays & Thursdays
8:30 a.m. – Classes begin! Math & Social Studies - Tuesdays & Fridays
Electives - Tuesdays & Thursdays
Tutorials are not offered on Wednesday mornings.
6th Grade
A Day Tutorials are many times offered on Wednesday afternoons from
st
1 period 8:30-9:52 a.m. 3:40-4:30 p.m. Prior arrangements should be made with the teacher when
nd
2 period
rd
9:57-12:24 p.m.   planning to attend Wednesday afternoon tutorials.
3 period 12:29-1:12 p.m.
th
4 period 1:15-1:58 p.m. It is the responsibility of the parent/student to take advantage of the before
th
5 period 2:03-3:30 p.m. school tutorial opportunities and to make arrangements for transportation.
B Day
th
6 period 8:30-9:52 a.m. Homework
th
7 period 9:57-12:24 p.m. Greater learning occurs with short intermittent practice activities rather than
th
8 period 12:29-1:12 p.m. massive amounts of practice. Homework will be limited in length and should
th
9 period 1:15-1:58 p.m. ALWAYS be checked allowing credit to be gained, thus giving credibility to
th
10 period 2:03-3:30 p.m. the activity. The amount of homework a child is assigned will increase each
year during grades 6-12.
7th & 8th Grade
A Day Make-up Work
st
1 period 8:30-9:55 a.m. Students who have an "excused" permit to class following an absence or
nd
2 period 10:00-12:30 p.m. tardy will be permitted to make up work missed. When the student returns
rd
3 period 12:35-2:00 p.m. to class it will be his/her responsibility to remind the teacher that he/she
th
4 period 2:05-3:30 p.m. have been absent and should request any missed work at that time. He/she
B Day then will be given the assignments and will be told the date(s) the work will
th
5 period 8:30-9:55 a.m. be due. The teacher may establish the schedule for the make-up work to be
th
6 period 10:00-12:30 p.m. completed but will allow not less than one school day for each day of
th
7 period 12:35-2:00 p.m. absence.
th
8 period 2:05-3:30 p.m.
Incomplete- Daily Work
Lunch Schedule Students will be allowed adequate time to complete daily work either in class
A lunch – 10:30-11:00 a.m. or as homework. Daily work includes work covered during class and/or
B lunch – 11:00-11:30 a.m.   short-term assignments. Once adequate time has been given, work is to be
C lunch – 11:30-12:00 p.m. taken up and graded as is. Credit will be given for the amount and the
D lunch – 12:00-12:30 p.m. quality of the assignment completed.
“Personal Organization”
Set Goals
That are specific, measurable, realistic and
achievable
Prioritize the “To Do List”
80/20 rule – 80% of the rewards – 20% of the
effort
Identify the items that yields the
greatest results “Pareto Principle”
Flag or color-code and assign a deadline
Be flexible
Plan only 50% of your time
That allows for flexibility to handle
emergencies and interruptions
“Effectiveness is doing
things right and efficiency
is doing the right things.”
Brian
Tracy
“The difference between
leaders and managers is
that leaders do the right
things and managers
simply do things right.”.” Brian
1/1 Tracy
Success is Dependent on
StartLeadership
With Myself
Create Time for Instructional Leadership
Focus on Student Learning
Develop Parental Confidence
Life-Long Learning for All
School
Improvement

5-Step Plan Resource


Center
Success is Dependent on
FocusLeadership
on Student Learning
Student Learning is “The Most
Important” Thing

School
Improvement
Resource
Center
Does Your Handbook Include?

Instructional Philosophy
Expected Lesson Design
Effective Classrooms
Pyramid of Interventions
How to utilize planning/collaboration time
Documentation of what should be taught each six weeks
using district curriculum
Expectations of Assessments
Utilizing Data to Drive Instruction
Teaching to the Student Expectation Level (SEL)
Blooms Taxonomy
Erickson’s Critical Thinking
•What weight do teachers give to homework grades, class
work, test performance, essays, special projects and other
assignment grades?
• How does a teacher handle Incomplete Work or Late
Work?
• Do you give six weeks grades lower than 50?
• Do you give six weeks grades higher than 100?
• Do you give 69’s?
• How do you handle re-teach and retest?
• Do you have a specific number of Summative and
Formative grades that are required during a six weeks?
• Do you allow a zero to be given? If so how are zeros and
F’s averaged into the total grade?
a. When a student starts to fail are parents notified?
b. Is a teacher required to notify the parent before they are allowed to
give a final grade of F?
c. Is there a Potential Retention Process in place that identifies kids
early in the year and establishes a process of guidelines for the
teacher, counselor, principal, parent and student to ensure that the
student had every opportunity to be successful?
d. How is make-up work handled?
e. What guidelines are in place before a teacher can assign an “I” at the
end of a six weeks?
f. Most teachers aren’t aware that when an “I” is given, the student
loses UIL Eligibility until that grade is finalized and is passing.
Do We Talk About Student Learning
Faculty Meetings
Working with Teachers on

Weekly Bulletin
Team/Department Meetings
Instruction

PTA Newsletters
Daily Announcements
Hallway Bulletin Boards
Themes and Slogans
Assemblies
Parent Meetings
Success is Dependent on
FocusLeadership
on Student Learning
Student Learning is “The Most
Important Thing”
Hire the “Best” People

School
Improvement
Resource
Center
The Teacher Makes the
Difference
“A single ineffective teacher can
thwart a child’s progress for at
least four years”

Teachers are more important


than class size, racial
composition, rural, urban or
suburban factors

Dr. William Sanders


University Tennessee
What to Look for in a
MassiveTeacher
Numbers of Applicants
Common Factors of Exceptional
Teachers Love of Learning &
Caring Learn How to Learn
Called to a
Relationships
Mission Learning Activities
Teachers are Based Upon
Family of
Human Excitement and
Teachers
See Students Drama
Had a Role
Outside of Lesson Plans Based
Model
Teaching on Student Needs
High Standards
Two-sided Respect
Talent Knowledge Teaching Skills
Motivatio Winning Helping
n for Student Student
Teaching Over Learn
What to Look for in a
Teacher
Child Centered Focus (Children versus
Content)

Parent and Student Friendly Don’t Be


Afraid to
Hire the Best
Looks to Self for Solutions to Problems

Will Focus on What Students Can Do


Not What They Cannot Do
Talent Knowledge Teaching Skills
Motivatio Winning Helping
n for Student Student
Teaching Over Learn
Developing Skills
Public Relations Training
R
Re el
le ati
Parent/Student Conferencing Skills van on
cy shi
Listening -R p
Empathy Grumpy teacher ig
or

Teach Staff Members to View Issues from


Student and/or Parent Perspective

Talent Knowledge Teaching Skills


Motivatio Winning Helping
n for Student Student
Teaching Over Learn
The Right Placement
Jim Collins Getting the Right
People in the Right
“Good to Seat on the Bus
Great” (Right Assignment)
“Soar With Your
Strengths”
Place People in
Donald Clifton & Areas of
Paula Nelson Strength

The best teachers with most needy students.


The Ship is Sinking
69’s
Teaching Curriculum SYSTEMS
Attending Faculty Meeting
Late to School – Early to Leave
Being Responsible for Written Information
Planning and Collaborating with Team
Informing Parents of Conduct and/or Grading Issues
Specific Grading Policy

Establish the Expectations


Success is Dependent on
FocusLeadership
on Student Learning
Student Learning is “The Most
Important Thing”
Hire the “Best” People
Teach the Right “Stuff”
At the “Right” Time School
Improvement
Resource
Center
90/90/90 – School Research
• Four year longitudinal • 90% of students on
study free-reduced lunch
• 1995-1998 • 90% of students
• Elementary through from ethnic
high school minorities
• 130,000 students and • 90% of students met
228 campuses academic standards
• Urban, Rural, and • Example:
Suburban schools Milwaukee Public
• Populations ranging TheSchools
90/90/90 Schools: A Case
Study
from poor/minority to
Dr. Douglas Reeves
largely
Anglo/economically Accountability in Action, 2nd
edition
advantaged
Characteristics Common to
90/90/90
1. Laser-like focus on achievement (Improvement).
2. Clear and defined curriculum choices.
(LA/Math)

– Frequent assessment of student progress.


– Teachers chart achievement weekly.
– Focused intervention. (Data + Intervention = Results)
– Multiple opportunities for students to
succeed.
7. Emphasis on informative writing.
8. External scoring utilized. (Outside the classroom)
9. Teachers give frequent written feedback.
Deep
Taught
Alignment
The Great
Writte
Equalizer
n
Taught
(SEL)

Teste
d
Writte Teste
n d

Content Level – right information


Cognitive Level – Aligned to the VERBS in
SEL (rigor)
Contextual Level – TAKS format
Curriculum Calendar
Effects of Deep Alignment
The Great Equalizer

• Levels the Playing Field for All


Students
• Mitigates effects of Low SES
• Allows focus on mastery levels
• Meets the state standards
• Allows for enrichment/acceleration
models
• Closes the achievement gap
• Helps teachers work smarter, not
Include Elective Teachers
• Include Academic & Elective Staff in
Preparing Students for TAKS

• Teach Elective Staff how to Develop


Higher Level Assessments and Rubrics

• Lesson Plans Should Reflect the


Reinforcing of TAKS Concepts in the
Elective Classes
Curriculum Matrix for Texas
Aligning Standards, Tests and Essential Skills
International Center for Leadership in Education
Success is Dependent on
FocusLeadership
on Student Learning
Student Learning is “The Most
Important Thing”
Hire the “Best” People
Teach the Right “Stuff”
At the “Right” Time School
Improvement
Use Appropriate Strategies Resource
Center
1/1

“If a child can’t learn


the way we teach,
maybe we should
teach the way they
learn.”
Isnacio Estrada
How Do Students Learn?
Attention – Information – Prior Experiences – Conclusions -
n
Application i o r l d
practice o n i a t o e s
a ti i g l w nc
o rm s t e a rie
g
n in f t e r e
i xa
te ctiv in v x p
do o n
c ask p e
e o f
i roc n i e ty
n r
relevant ques g essin va uli
tio g s t im g
ns c h in
g e a

teacher’s
i n o f t
er ns i e ty
w v a r i e s from others
s ti o t e g
an two-way
s s tr a i s u a l ,
u e
d i t o r y ,v
qpcommunication
oste au
rs , ta c t i l e
mus art,
ic searching for
1/1

“Tell me, and I’ll


forget, show me,
and I’ll
remember,
involve me, and
1/1
I’ll learn.”
Marla Jones
Brainstorm with Teachers
What Should Be
Happening
Instruction presented in ain the
variety Classroom?
of Learning Styles
Information related to meaning and real-life experiences
Visuals
Interaction among students
Centers Teach
Teachers
Addressing a variety of learning styles
Instructional
Instructional stimuli
Best Practices
Two-way communication
Higher level questioning activities
Teach Principals & Teachers
What Active
Learning PLUQ
Circle Learning Looks Like
(Point/Link/Use/Question)
Concept Maps Oral Reports/Presentations
Cooperative Learning Activities Pair-Share
Current Events Role Play
Discussions/Debates Use of Technology
Graphic Organizers Venn Diagrams
Jigsaw Activities Summarization Activities
KWL Socratic Questioning
Learning Logs/Journals Walkabouts
Large Population of LEP Students
From Instructional
Strategies A-Z 26
Strategies
Link for Teaching
Instructional Concepts LEP Students
to Student Experiences
Word Walls (pictures and words)
Utilize visual as well as auditory teaching strategies
Examine teacher language Spiral and repeat language learning
Have students speak (think-aloud, pair-share, oral summaries)
Emphasize key vocabulary (TAKS vocabulary)
Graphic organizers (outlines, mind maps) (Inspiration)
Check understanding by having students create own examples.
Tape Recorders Teach patterns and memory techniques
Centers Utilize lists, charts as visual reviews
Focus on Best Practice
Strategies
Region Service Centers
CRISS Strategies (Hands on activities)
Writing Across the Curriculum (Journal)
Teachers Share Proven Strategies
(Collaboration)
Graphic Organizers (Inspiration)
History Alive (Active relevancy)
Questioning Skills (Socratic questioning)
Active Best Practice (Pair-share, jig-saw)
SIOP (ESL Strategies)
Higher Order Thinking Skills (Bloom’s &
Erickson)
Manipulatives (Make your own in math)
Read 360 – Agile Mind – New Jersey - TEXTeams
Implications for Adult Learning
Adults will commit to learning when they believe that the
objectives are realistic and important for their personal
and professional needs.

Want to be the origin of their own learning.

Need direct, concrete experiences for applying what has


been learned.
Need follow-up support.

Need feedback on the results of their efforts.


Professional Development – Ongoing! Marsha Speck & Caroll Knipe
Success is Dependent on
FocusLeadership
on Student Learning
Student Learning is “The Most
Important Thing”
Hire the “Best” People
Teach the Right “Stuff”
At the “Right” Time School
Improvement
Use Appropriate Strategies Resource

Plan, Instruct, Assess at Center

Appropriate Rigor (SEL)


“Don’t limit a child to
your own learning, for
he was born in a
different time.”
Rabbinic saying
Teaching and
planning for
delivery have 1/1
Bloom’s Taxonomy Analysis Tool
Evaluation
Level of Difficulty

TAKS
Synthesis

Analysis
Active Learning
Application

Comprehensio
TAAS
n
Direct Teach
Knowledge

Facts Topics Concepts Generalizations


/ Principles

Level of Complexity
Erickson’s Structure of Knowledge
10th Grade Mathematics
Objective 7: The student will demonstrate an understanding of two-and-three
dimensional representations of geometric relationships and shapes.

TEK 8.7 Geometry and spatial reasoning. The student uses geometry to
model and describe the physical world. The student is expected to
SEL (A) draw solids from different perspectives
(B) use geometric concepts and properties to solve problems
in fields such as art and architecture and
(C) use pictures or models to demonstrate the Pythagorean
Theorem

What must the student be able to do to demonstrate mastery?


Which might be some student products?
What instructional strategies will generate those products?
Cognitive Level – Aligned to the VERBS in SEL (rigor)
10th Grade Mathematics
Objective 7: The student will demonstrate an understanding of two-and-three
dimensional representations of geometric relationships and shapes.

TEK 8.7 Geometry and spatial reasoning. The student uses geometry to
model and describe the physical world. The student is expected to
SEL (A) draw solids from different perspectives
(B) use geometric concepts and properties to solve problems
in fields such as art and architecture and
(C) use pictures or models to demonstrate the Pythagorean
Theorem

(A) Today we are going to use geometry to


draw solids in different perspectives.
Teach Vocabulary
Materials to Help Teachers Plan to the SEL
Curriculum & Instructional Calendar
Examples of SEL
Released Test Answer Sheet – Answers listed by SEL
TAKS Study Guide
TAKS Information Booklets
Dallas County Schools website
TAKS Tornados
Time to Plan Together

Plan Activities, Questions, Products & Assessments to the SEL


Bloom’s Taxonomy & Erickson’s Structure of Knowledge-
Elementary
Middle
School
High School
Math
Language
Science
SS
ESL
Spanish
TEKS
Special
Education
How Does Principal Monitor Rigor?
Planning & Delivery
By observing student activities and products
By listening to questioning techniques utilized by teacher

Assessment
Reviewing teacher made assessments
Daily, weekly, 3-weeks, 6-weeks

Lesson Plans – What is Taught Assessments,


Questions, Products & Activities - Rigor
Success is Dependent on
FocusLeadership
on Student Learning
Student Learning is “The Most
Important Thing”
Hire the “Best” People
Teach the Right “Stuff”
At the “Right” Time School
Improvement
Use Appropriate Strategies Resource

Plan, Instruct, Assess at Center

Change is Difficult
Appropriate Rigor (SEL)
A Mule Called Hiney
An old farmer and his
grandson owned a mule
called Hiney. Things weren’t
going well on the farm, and
the bills were mounting.
They decided it would be
best to take Hiney to the city
to be sold.
A Mule Called Hiney
The old farmer and his grandson
started to walk Hiney down the road.
A woman saw them and shouted,
“You foolish people! Why are
you walking when you have a
mule you could ride?”
They decided that she had a
point and climbed on the mule.
A Mule Called Hiney
Down the road a way
another woman called to
them. “What fools you are!
With both of you riding that
mule, he will become
exhausted and drop dead!”
So the old man climbed off!
A Mule Called Hiney
A little farther down the road
a farmer shouted, “You
foolish lad, making your old
grandfather walk while you
ride! Aren’t you ashamed?”
The boy climbed off and
urged the grandfather to get
back on.
A Mule Called Hiney
A short time later an old
woman called out, “You
foolish man! That poor
mule looks as if he is going
to drop dead. Get off and
carry him for awhile!”
A Mule Called Hiney
Thinking that she had a point, the
grandfather dismounted, hoisted the
mule onto his back and headed back
toward the city. When he
came to a bridge he lost his
footing and dropped the mule
into the river. Of course the
poor animal drowned.
A Mule Called Hiney

If you try to please everyone,


You will lose your
Success is Dependent on
StartLeadership
With Myself
Create Time for Instructional Leadership
Focus on Student Learning
Develop Parental Confidence

School
Improvement

5-Step Plan Resource


Center
Feeling Tone

What Does the School Look Like?


Is the Entry and Office Area Orderly?
Is the Marquee Updated
Is Posted Information in Office
Accurate
Office Staff and Faculty (Key – call
school)
Visibility of Staff
Is There a Waiting Area for Parents
What is Your First Impression?
Promote the School
Materials for parents to view while
waiting
PTO Newsletters Calendar of
Meetings
Middle School Pamphlets
Handbooks
School Board Agenda Parenting
Tips
Yearbook Campus Plan Brag
Sheet
Establish an Academic Focus!
Expand the Walls of the
School
Visit Churches Report Cards at
Ballgames
Meetings at Apartment Complexes
Community Centers – (elementary
schools)
Post newsletters and meeting notes
at grocery stores
schoolnotes.com Key
Communicators
Accept No Excuse for Not Knowing!
Get Parents Involved
Student Performances (Food, Prizes,
Coupons)
Parent Education Opportunities
GED, Anger Management, English
Classes
Use as Tutors with non-English
speakers
Job Posting Opportunities
Communities in Schools
Partner with Health Services
Utilize Parents to Help Break the Cycle of Poverty!
Success is Dependent on
StartLeadership
With Myself
Create Time for Instructional Leadership
Focus on Student Learning
Develop Parental Confidence
Create a Community for Learning
School
Improvement

5-Step Plan Resource


Center
Success is Dependent on
Leadership
“A good leader never
stops learning. A
great leader never
stops teaching.”
1/2 John
Success is Dependent on
Leadership
“Who dares to teach
must never cease to
learn.”
John Cotton Dana
2/2
High School is
Only the
Beginning
Become
a life-
long
learner!
Expectation That Education Continues Beyond High
School
Graduation & Pre-Graduation
“You can teach a
student a lesson for a
day; but if you can
teach him to learn by
curiosity, he will
continue the learning
process as long as he
1/2 Clay P. Bedford
lives.”
“I like a teacher who
gives you something
to take home to think
about besides
homework.”
2/2 Lily Tomlin
Establish Academic
Celebrations and
Competitions
• Academic Celebrations
• Academic Pep Rallies, Parties and
Privileges
• School Academic Clubs
• UIL Academic Competitions
• Spelling Bee
• In School Competitions (Academic Decathlon)
• Academic Field Trips (Focus on College)
• Odyssey of the Mind
• Activities and Events that Require Good
Grades or Improvement as a Perquisite
to Attend
Deliver the Message that
“It’s Okay to Do Well Academically”
Principal Should be the
Example of Life-long
Learning
Schedule time & practice regular reflection and self-assessment.
Attend leadership assessment training(s).
Join appropriate professional organizations.
Read, analyze and share educational publications.
Attend “Best Practice” Conferences.
Attend teacher trainings focused on instruction.
Create time to “network” with other administrators to discuss common
issues.
Collaborate with experienced educationalists. (Find a Friend - 2nd set of eyes)
Communicate key components of your action plan to stakeholders as
appropriate to create desired behaviors in the people around you
“Find a Friend”
The Path to School Leadership
Lee G. Bolman & Terrence E. Deal

8th Habit
Stephen Covey

The Last Season


Phil Jackson

Wooden on Leadership
“Everything I’ve learned came from someone else.”
“Brown prepared for the championship encore by
consulting with coaches who’d won previous titles”

Steve Spurrier – South Carolina


Phillip Fulmer – Tennessee
Lloyd Carr – Michigan
The Best Strive to Get Better!
Bob Stoops – Oklahoma
Darrell Royal - Texas

USA Today

July 26, 2007


How Do We Get Teachers to
Recognize That They Can Improve?
Teachers are more important
than class size, racial
composition, rural, urban or
suburban
“The factors
greater the
responsibility for student
learning the greater the
results.” • Scott
Talk About the Data
“Brutal Truth”
Educators can’t address student needs if
they don’t know what, how significant, or
how extensive those needs are.
Show them data of schools and teachers
who are successful with kids like they
have.
Visit schools.
Read articles together. Explain the rigor
required!
Bell Curve
The Bell-Curve belief is that achievement
is a function of ability. Some students
have it and will get it, some don’t and
won’t. Has had a great impact on sorting
and selecting students for success or
failure.
J Curve Race for All Kids!

The J-Curve belief is that achievement is


a function of time and motivation and
self-fulfilling prophecy. I believe I can
do it, I will ….and even more powerful,
if a teacher believes a student can do it,
the student will.
Talk About the Data
“Safe Environment”
Create a climate where it is professionally
and emotionally safe to look at student
data.
Teachers will resist using data if they feel
that the information will be used against
them for evaluative or punitive purposes.
Especially newcomers to data-driven
education.
Data-driven teachers should view data as
feedback, not as indictments.
Teach teachers to compete against
themselves not against each other. (We all
Talk About the Data
“Information Transparency”
Data is valued, visible and talked about
graphs, tables, agendas and other
indicators of data usage permeate
the school environment.
discussions about data are frequent
and analysis of student data is considered
to be an integral part to the teaching
learning process.
Talk About the Data
“Collaborative Discussions” “Regular
Meetings”
Ultimately, teachers need time to collaboratively
examine classroom-level data so that they can
identify and learn effective instructional
techniques from each other.
In a school where a climate of safety exists, data
are used to highlight faculty strengths and
structure professional development opportunities
rather than to identify weaknesses and blame
teachers.
Principals might consider a needs assessment of
their staff’s concerns and fears and work
diligently to address those needs in collaboration
with their faculty.
Meeting Agendas
Analyze results finding gaps & strengths
mastery levels and learning needs
demographic subgroups and individual
students content strands
item-level data
Look at student work
Discuss strategic, targeted, focused
instructional interventions to improve student
learning. Strategies that are content-specific,
aligned with district curricula, developmentally
appropriate.
Monitor Meetings
Curriculum alignment
Target specific goals for improvement
Generate ideas to try out in their classroom
Understanding the SEL
Monitoring results
It’s the data-driven dialogue that takes place in
department, course- or grade level teams, not
the rank-ordering of schools in the newspaper,
that provides the real momentum for improving
student learning.
“The Principals Role”
Align and help teachers connect with
necessary resource to facilitate effective
educational interventions.

Serves as a resource for classroom


interventions.
Continually asks questions that guides
classroom instruction. Why do we do what
we do? Is what we are doing working?

Helps teachers “chunk” ambitious long-


term objectives into short-term goals.
Celebrate gains!
Demonstrate to Staff Life-long
Learning for Improvement
What are my area(s) of strength?
What area(s) do I most need to focus?
What topic(s) would you seek my advice?
What skill(s) do I need to immediately
develop and implement that would
positively enhance the school and student
learning?

Predict Results!
“It is impossible for a man to
learn what he thinks he already
knows.” Epictetus

If I Can Get Teachers to:


Understand That They Make a
Difference
Take Responsibility for
Student Learning
Develop a Passion and Desire
to Be the Best That They Can
1/1
Be
Do You Really Think You
Do You Really Think You Can
Can Make a Difference?
Make A Difference?
The Starfish Story
by Loren Eiseley

Once upon a time, there


was a wise man who used
to go to the ocean to do his
writing. He had a habit of
walking on the beach
before he began his work.
One day as he was walking
along the shore, he looked
down the beach and saw a
human figure moving like a
dancer. He smiled to
himself at the thought of
someone who would dance
to the day, and so, he
As he got closer, he noticed
that the figure was that of a
young man, and that what
he was doing was not
dancing at all. The young
man was reaching down to
the shore, picking up small
objects, and throwing them
He came closer still and
called out “Good morning!
May I ask what it is that you
are doing?”
The young man paused,
looked up, and replied
“Throwing starfish into the
ocean.”
“I must ask then, why are
you throwing starfish into
the ocean?” asked the
somewhat startled wise
man.
To this the young man
replied, “The sun is up and
the tide is going out. If I
Upon hearing this, the wise
man commented, “But,
young man, do you not
realize that there are miles
and miles of beach and
there are starfish all along
every mile? You can’t
possibly make a
At this the young man bent
down, picked up yet
another starfish, and threw
it into the ocean. As it met
the water, he said,

“It made a difference for


Success is Dependent on
“I believe leadership is
Leadership
largely learned. Not
everyone can lead, nor is
every leader destined for
glory, but most of us have
a potential far beyond
what we think possible.”
1/3 John Wooden
I Will Make a Difference!
Start With Myself
Create Time for Instructional Leadership
Focus on Student Learning
Develop Parental Confidence
Create a Community for Learning
School

Principals Improvement
Resource

Make the
Center
Success is Dependent on
StartLeadership
With Myself
Create Time for Instructional Leadership
Focus on Student Learning
Develop Parental Confidence
Create a Community for Learning
School

15 Minute
Improvement
Resource
Center

Break