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AS Media Studies

Textual Analysis – TV
Drama

Exam unit: 50% of your
AS grade
• High expectations:
– Everyone has the opportunity to get an
A
– Everyone will be given the opportunity
to get an A
• It’s up to you to decide if you want an A!

– There will be homework every week
– You must put in around 4 hours
– The more work you put in the more likely you are to get
an A grade.

Exam unit: 50% of your
AS grade
• Two questions
– One will focus on the Film Industry –
you will do this on a Monday morning
with Mary
– The other will focus on TV Drama – you
will do this with me on a Thursday
afternoon

Introduction – Television Drama
Officially known as the Textual Analysis question

• Marked out of 50
• Need to get 40+ for an A




35-39=B
30-34=C
25-29=D
20-24=E
0-19=U

• On same paper as Film Industry

Introduction to
Television Drama
• 1 exam question
– Based on an unseen clip

• 30 minutes viewing time plus 45 minutes writing
time
– Get to watch a 5 minute clip from an unseen television
drama. Opportunities to make notes between the
screenings

• Will focus answer on an area of representation
• Will write about how media language constructs
messages about representation through four
micro areas of
– Camerawork | editing | sound | mise en scene

Exam - continued
• You will be marked on:
– How well you use examples from the
clip of the four technical areas (20/50
marks)
– How well you explain how
representation is constructed in the clip
(20/50 marks)
– Your use of terminology in your answer

Introduction to the unit
Read
through the

handout
Our lessons are based around ‘flipped
learning’

Talking of terminology….
Or who did their reading week activities?

• What is a sound motif?
• What is the difference between
diegetic and non-diegetic sound?
• What is a canted angle?
• Which of the four technical areas
would body language be an element
of?
• List 5 elements of mise-en-scene
• What is asynchronous sound?

Terminology test
continued:
• Which element of camerawork does
an eye-line match belong to?
• Which of the four technical areas
would ‘performance’ come under?
• What is a motivated cut?
• What is the difference between
tracking and panning?
• What is foley sound?

Talking of terminology….
Or who did their reading week activities?

• What is a sound motif?
– A sound or musical refrain which usually accompanies a character and introduces
them to the audience

• What is the difference between diegetic and non-diegetic
sound?
– Diegetic sound has the source within the world of the film. Nondiegetic sound is added in post production (such as a musical score).

• What is a canted angle?
– Slanted camera angle that could be around 5 degrees of centre

• Which of the four technical areas would body language be an
element of?
– Mise-en-scene

• List 5 elements of mise-en-scene
– Lighting | setting | costume | location | NVC

• What is asynchronous sound?
– Sound that demands a different emotional
effect to that depicted on screen

Terminology test
continued:
• Which element of camerawork does an eye-line match
belong to?
– Editing

• Which of the four technical areas would ‘performance’ come
under?
– Mise-en-scene

• What is a motivated cut?
– Motivated cut is put to connect two scenes: the subject wanting or
searching the object of interest and the object of interest.

• What is the difference between tracking and panning?
– Tracking is when the camera moves with the subject
– Panning is when the camera pivots from side to side but remains
stationary

• What is foley sound?
– Natural sound enhanced in post production

Unit: what will you
study?
• Representation:
– What is representation?
– Define with the person sitting next to
you and write your definition on the
board
– What is this?
– What is this?

Representation
• Presentation (or re-presentation) of an event, group of
people or idea in a way that appears ‘normal’ or like
‘reality’
• Representation is always constructed from the point of
view of the person who made the representation (eg
writer or director) and will therefore always reflect the
values of the creator
• These ‘creators’ often fall into the dominant group in our
society
– Who is the dominant group in society?

• We are conditioned to accept the point of view of the
creator (preferred reading)
• Mass media also tends to be owned by this dominant
group!

Preferred Readings
• Common ideas in society seen in the media
that we are conditioned to see as ‘normal’
include:
– The ‘nuclear’ family as normal and desired
• In real life the majority of families are not like this!

– Women are normally found in domestic roles
(cooking, cleaning, home-making, child-rearing)
• Any woman found challenging the above is ‘abnormal’
in some way (masculine in appearance, unattractive)

– Gangs of youths in hoodies are up to no good
– Men are usually the boss

Preferred Readings
continued
• Look at the seven areas of representation on
the introductory handout:
• In your group identify a common ‘norm’ found
in society for each one
– Age
– Gender
– Regional Identity
– Social Class and Status
– Ability and Disability
– Sexuality
– Ethnicity

Representation in TV
drama
• Often reliant on stereotypes
– Define stereotype in your group and write on the board

• Over-simplified image or idea of a person or
thing that focuses on one element and attaches
meaning
• Used to drive plot and narrative
• Used to show power imbalances between groups of
people (eg male v female; young v old)
• Media frequently focuses on negative stereotypes –
uses them as character short-cuts
• We are going to explore how the 4 micro areas are
used to construct messages about representation

Representation in
society
• Complete the task on stereotypes in
pairs

Reading Week Activities
• In your group, compare your research into a
television drama.
• Collectively
– Make a list of the conclusions that you’ve made
about how age and gender tend to be represented
in television drama
• Include reference to
– Ideology
– Preferred readings
– Stereotypes

– Bring all this together into five key points
– Present your findings to the rest of the class

Homework
• Visit the TV Drama Blog (you aren’t
logging in!)
– Complete the activities on mise-enscene and camerawork

• You must complete these activities as
next Thursday we are focusing on
applying your knowledge of these
two micro areas to sequences from
TV dramas