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CHEM 155Basic Physical Chemistry

(2, 1, 2)
1

Introduction to Physical Chemistry: Definition,


Structure of Science, Classifications; Laws,
Hypotheses, Theories and Models.

States of Matter I: Classification; Structure and


Properties of matter; Types of systems; State variables
and Equations of state.

Thermodynamics I: The First law, Heat Capacity,


Enthalpy and Thermo-chemistry.

Chemical Kinetics I: Elementary Chemical Kinetics,


Basic Laws, Effect of Temperature and the Arrhenius
equation.

MATTER
2

States of Matter, Structure (the way


something is put together) and Property
State and Variables of a System
Equation of State
Gas Laws
Kinetic theory of Gases
Real Gases

States of matter
3

Matter Definition:
Aggregation of atoms/ions/molecules which come within
the scope of human experience i.e. any substance that
has mass and occupies space.
States of Matter:
Matter exists in one of the following six states due to the
energy of its particles: Gaseous, Liquid, Solid, Plasma,
Bose-Einstein and Filament. The states of matter are also
known as phases of matter or states of aggregation.

The division of matter into states is not always simple.


How, for example, should chocolate spread be considered.
Some scientists beleive that the so called colloids should
be considered.

Assignment
4

1)

What is Physical Chemistry?

2)

What are the classifications in science?

3)

4)

Using a diagram illustrate the structure of


science
Explain the following terms:

Laws
Hypotheses
Theories
Models

Four states of matter


5

Matter is made up of particles which are in


continual random motion
Based upon particle arrangement
Based upon energy of particles
Based upon distance between
particles

State
Gas

Determinant
Structure
Kinetic energy is more Collection of particles in
continuous
random
(simplest
important than potential
chaotic motion.
state
of
energy.
no
well-defined
Has
matter)
Intermolecular force are
surface.
weak.
No limit on extent of
space or volume it can
Liquid

Potential energy is more

occupy.
No long-range order but

important

vestiges of crystal lattice

than

kinetic

energy.

structure at short range.

Intermolecular
strong

forces

Has a surface and place a


limit

on

the

extent

of

space or volume it can


Solid

occupy.
Potential energy is more Generally possesses crystal
important

than

kinetic lattice structure well defined

States of matter - Solids


7

Particles of solids are


tightly packed, vibrating
about a fixed position
Solids have a definite
shape and a definite
volume

Heat

States of matter - Liquid

Particles of liquids are


tightly packed, but are
far enough apart to
slide over one another.

Liquids have an
indefinite shape and a
definite volume.

Heat
8

States of matter - Gas

Particles of gases are


very far apart and
move freely

Gases have an
indefinite shape and
an indefinite volume
Heat
9

Phase changes
10

Descripti
on of
Phase
Change
Solid to
liquid

Term for
Phase
Change

Melting

Liquid to
Freezing
solid

Heat Movement
During
Phase Change
Heat goes into
the solid as it
melts.
Heat leaves the
liquid as it
freezes.

Phase changes
11

Description
of Phase
Change
Liquid to
gas
Gas to
liquid
Solid to
gas

Term for
Heat Movement
Phase
During
Change
Phase Change
Vaporization Heat goes into the
(boiling and liquid as it
evaporation) vaporizes.
Heat leaves the gas
Condensation
as it condenses.
Heat goes into the
Sublimation solid as it
sublimates.

States of matter - Plasma

A plasma is an
ionized gas.
A plasma is a very
good conductor of
electricity and is
affected by magnetic
fields.
Plasmas, like gases,
have an indefinite
shape and an
indefinite volume.

Plasma

12

States of matter
13

SOLID
Tightly packed,
in a regular
pattern
Vibrate, but do
not move from
place to place

LIQUID
Close together
with no regular
arrangement.
Vibrate, move
about, and slide
past each other

GAS
Well separated
with no regular
arrangement.
Vibrate and
move freely at
high speeds

PLASMA

Has no definite
volume or
shape and is
composed of
electrical
charged
particles

Property
14

A property is an essential or distinctive


attribute (quality) of something; a quality
or characteristics that something has

A property cannot be a function of the


past history (previous conditions under
which it has existed) of a system; it
depends only on the conditions at the
time of consideration

Thermodynamic equilibria
15

Thermodynamic equilibrium
Properties of state are independent of time and there is no
flow of mass or energy
Steady state equilibria
When there is a flow of matter or energy through a
system, and yet no change of properties
Homogenous and Heterogenous systems
A system is homogeneous if its properties are uniform
throughout and consists of a single phase or physical state
A system is heterogeneous if it contains more than one
phase

State function
16

State Function: Any system property (measurable


physical characteristic of a system, independent of how)
determined exclusively by the values of the initial and
final states. Examples are U, H, A, T, P, V etc
Path Function: Relate to the preparation of the state.
Examples, energy transfered as heat and work that is
done in preparing a state
Thermodynamic leads to the definition of additional
properties that can also be used to describe the states of
a system, and are themselves state variables. A, G, ..

Basic concepts of thermodynamics


17

The study of the flow of heat or any


other form of energy into or out of a
system as it undergoes a physical or
chemical transformation.

Thermodynamics deals with the interconversion of various Kinds of energy


and changes in physical properties that
are involved.

Three empirical laws


18

The study of thermodynamics is based


on three broad generalisations derived
from well established experimental
results

These generalisations are known as the


First,
Second
and
Third
law
of
thermodynamics

Scope of thermodynamics
19

Most of the important laws of Physical Chemistry


can
be
derived
from
the
laws
of
thermodynamics.

It tells whether a particular physical or chemical


change can occur under a given set of conditions
of temperature, pressure and concentration.

It also helps in predicting how far a physical or


chemical change can proceed, until the
equilibrium conditions are established.

20

Limitations of
thermodynamics

Thermodynamics is applicable to macroscopic


systems consisting of matter in bulk and not to
microscopic systems of individual atoms or
molecules. It ignores the internal structure of
atoms and molecules.

Thermodynamics does not bother about the


time factor. That is, it does not tell anything
regarding the rate of a physical change or a
chemical reaction. It is concerned only with the
initial and the final states of the system.

Thermodynamic systems
21

A part of the physical universe that is


separated from the rest of the universe
by real or imaginary boundaries under
consideration or discussion.

22

Thermodynamic
surroundings

The part of the universe outside the


boundary of the system is referred to as
surroundings

Homogeneous systems
23

A homogeneous System is the system that is


uniform throughout

A homogeneous system is made of one phase


only

Examples are : a pure single solid, liquid or gas,


mixtures of gases, and true solution of a solid in
a liquid

A phase is a homogeneous, physically distinct


and mechanically separable portion of a system

Heterogeneous systems
24

A heterogeneous system is one which


consists of two or more phases. In other
words it is not uniform throughout.

Examples of heterogeneous systems


are : ice in contact with water, ice in
contact with vapour etc. Here ice, water
and vapour constitute separate phases.

Types of thermodynamic systems


25

Isolated system
26

When the boundary is both sealed and


insulated, no interaction is possible with
the surroundings.

Therefore, an isolated system is one that


can transfer neither matter nor energy
to and from its surroundings.

Closed system
27

A closed system is one which cannot


transfer matter but can transfer energy
in the form of heat, work and radiation to
and from its surroundings.

The boundary of a closed system is


sealed but not insulated.

Open system
28

Therefore, an open system is one which


can transfer both energy and matter to
and from its surroundings.

The boundary of an open system is open


and un-insulated.

Intensive and extensive properties


29

The macroscopic or bulk properties of a


system (volume, pressure, mass, etc.)
can be divided into two classes:
Intensive
Extensive

properties
properties

Intensive properties
30

A property which does not depend on


the quantity of matter present in the
system.

Examples of intensive properties are


pressure, temperature, density, and
concentration.

Extensive properties
31

A property that does depend on the


quantity of matter present in the system.

Some examples of extensive properties


are volume, number of moles, enthalpy,
entropy, and Gibbs free energy.

Intensive and extensive properties


32

33

Intensive and extensive


properties

State of a system
34

A thermodynamic system is said to be in a


certain state when all its properties are fixed.

The fundamental properties which determine


the state of a system are pressure (P),
temperature (T), volume (V), mass and
composition.

Since a change in the magnitude of such


properties alters the state of the system, these
are referred to as State variables or State
functions or Thermodynamic parameters.

State of a system
35

A change of system from the initial state


to the final state (2nd state) will be
accompanied by change in the state
variables.

It is not necessary to state all the


properties (state variables) to define a
system completely.

Equation of states
36

The behaviour of a gaseous system can be described


and predicted mathematically as
P = f(T,V, n)
(1)

The pressure P, is the dependent variable and there


are three independent variables, T, V and n. The
letter f stands for the functional relationship.

Eqn (1) phenomenogically summarizes empirical


observation called laws or rules i.e. reflect some
aspect of the behaviour of nature and must therefore
be correct (within limits of experimental error).

Equation of states
37

The equation of state for one mole of a


pure gas is:
PV = RT
where R is gas constant.

If of the three state variables (P, V, T),


two (P, T) are specified, the value of third
(V) becomes fixed and can be calculated
from the equation of state.

Dependent and independent variables


38

The variables (such as P and T) which


must be necessarily specified to define
the state of a system, are called
Independent state variables.

The remaining state variable (V) which


depends on the value of P and T, is
called Dependent state variable.

Equilibrium states
39

A system in which the state variables have


constant values throughout the system is
said to be in a state of thermodynamic
equilibrium.

If the frictionless piston is stationary, the state of the


gas can be specified by giving the values of pressure
and volume.

Nonequilibrium state
40

A system in which the state variables have


different values in different parts of the
system is said to be in a non-equilibrium state.

If the gas is compressed very rapidly by moving the


piston, it passes through states in which pressure and
temperature cannot be specified, since these properties
vary throughout the gas.

Criteria for equilibrium


41

The temperature of the system must be


uniform and must be the same as that of
the surroundings (thermal equilibrium)

The mechanical properties must be uniform


throughout
the
system
(mechanical
equilibrium)

The chemical composition of the system


must be uniform with no net chemical
change (chemical equilibrium)

Thermodynamic processes
42

When a thermodynamic system changes


from one state to another, the operation
is called a Process.

A process involves change in conditions


(temperature, pressure and volume).

Isothermal processes
43

Those
processes
in
which
the
temperature remains fixed, are termed
isothermal processes.

Isothermal process is achieved by


placing the system in a thermostat (a
constant temperature bath).

For an isothermal process dT = 0

Adiabatic processes
44

Those processes in which no heat flows


into or out of the system, are called
adiabatic processes.

Adiabatic conditions can be approached


by carrying the process in an insulated
container such as thermos bottle. High
vacuum and highly polished surfaces
help to achieve thermal insulation.

For an adiabatic process dq = 0

Isobaric processes
45

Those processes which take place at constant


pressure are called isobaric processes.

For example, heating of water to its boiling point


and its vaporisation take place at the same
atmospheric pressure. These changes are,
therefore, designated as isobaric processes and
are said to take place isobarically.

For an isobaric process dp = 0

Isochoric processes
46

Those processes in which the volume


remains constant are known as isochoric
processes.

Heating of a substance in a nonexpanding chamber is an example of


isochoric process.

For isochoric processes dV = 0.

Basic thermodynamic processes


47

Cyclic process
48

When a system in a given state goes


through a number of different processes
and finally returns to its initial state, the
overall process is called a cycle or cyclic
process.

For a cyclic process dE = 0, dH = 0.

Cyclic process
49

Reversible and irreversible processes


50

A thermodynamic reverse process is one that


takes place infinitesimally slowly and its
direction at any point can be reversed by an
infinitesimal change in the state of the
system.

A reversible process proceeds from the initial


state to the final state through an infinite
series of infinitesimally small stages.

At the initial, final and all intermediate


stages, the system is in equilibrium state.

Reversible and irreversible processes


51

When a process goes from the initial to


the final state in a single step and
cannot be carried in the reverse order, it
is said to be an irreversible process.

Reversible and irreversible processes


52

(a) Reversible expansion occurs by decreasing the


pressure on the piston by infinitesimal amounts
(b) Irreversible expansion occurs by sudden
decrease of pressure from P to P, when the gas
expands rapidly in a single operation

Reversible and Irreversible Processes


53

Nature of heat and work


54

HEAT: is a transfer of energy as a result


of a temperature difference between the
system and the surroundings

Work
55

Work is a transfer of energy that can be


used to change the height of a weight
somewhere in the surrounding

Only two ways in which the energy of a


closed system can be changed: by
transferring energy as work or heat

We shall refer the term work for


mechanical work which is defined as force
distance

Units of heat
56

SI unit of heat is joule (J)

The unit of heat, which was used for many


years, is calorie (cal)

A calorie is defined as the quantity of heat


required to raise the temperature of 1 gram
of water by 1 C in the vicinity of 15 C
1 joule = 0.239 calories
1 calorie = 4.184 J
1 kcal = 4.184 kJ

Sign Convention of Heat


57

The symbol of heat is q

If the heat flows from the surroundings


into the system to raise the energy of
the system, it is taken to be positive, +q

If heat flows from the system into the


surroundings, lowering the energy of the
system, it is taken to be negative, q

Sign convention for heat flow in a system


58

Sign Convention of Work


59

The symbol of work is w

If work is done on a system by the


surroundings and the energy of the
system is thus increased, it is taken to
be positive, +w

If work is done by the system on the


surroundings and energy of the system
is decreased, it is taken to be negative,
w

60

Summary of Sign
Conventions
Heat flows into the
system, q is +ve

Heat flows out of the


system, q is ve

Work is done on the Work is done by the


system, w is +ve
system, w is ve

PressureVolume Work
61

Mechanical work is defined as force


multiplied by the distance through which
the force acts

In elementary thermodynamics the only


type of work generally considered is the
work done in expansion (or compression)
of a gas

This is known as pressure-volume work


or PV work or expansion work

PressureVolume Work
62

Consider a gas contained in a cylinder fitted


with a frictionless piston. The pressure (force
per unit area) of the gas, P, exerts a force on
the piston. This can be balanced by applying
an equal but opposite pressure from outside
on the piston (Pext).

Remember that it is the external pressure


(Pext) and not the internal pressure of the gas
itself which is used in evaluating work. This is
true whether it be expansion or contraction.

63

PressureVolume Work
(Expansion)
Work = force distance
w=fl

(1)

Since pressure is force per area,


f = Pext A

(2)

Where A is the cross-sectional


area of the piston,
From (1) and (2),
w = Pext A x l
w = - Pext

Since the system (gas) is doing work


surroundings (piston), it bears a ve sign.

on

the

PressureVolume Work (Compression)


64

Similarly, work done in compression of a gas can


also be calculated.

In that case the piston will move down and sign of


the work will be positive.

w = Pext V

Class exercise
65

Calculate the pressure-volume work


done when a system containing a gas
expands from 1.0 litre to 2.0 litres
against a constant external pressure of
10 atmospheres.

Isothermal reversible expansion work of


an ideal gas
66

Suppose the gas expands in


reversibly from volume V1 to V2
at a constant temperature.

Pressure of the gas reduces


from P1 to P2.

Pext equals the internal pressure of


the gas (Pgas) and the piston
remains stationary.

If Pext is decreased by an
infinitesimal amount dP, the gas
expands reversibly and the piston
moves through a distance dl.

Isothermal reversible expansion work of


an ideal gas
67

Since dP is so small, for all


practical purposes,
Pext = Pgas = P

The work done by the gas


in one infinitesimal step
dw, can be expressed as
dw = P A dl
= P dV

where dV is the increase in


volume

Isothermal reversible expansion work of


an ideal gas
68

The total amount of work done by the


isothermal reversible expansion of the
ideal gas fromV V1 to V2 is,
2

w PdV
V1

nRT
P :
By the ideal gas equation
V
V2
nRT
w
dV
V
V1
V2

dV
nRT
V
V1

Isothermal reversible expansion work of


an ideal gas
69

Integral thereof gives:


V2
w nRT ln
V1

P1V1 = P2V2
V2/V1 = P1/P2
p1
w nRT ln
p2
p1
w 2.303 nRT log
p2

Isothermal reversible compression work of


an ideal gas
70

Isothermal compression work of an ideal


gas may be derived similarly.

It has exactly the same value with the


sign changed.

The pressure on the piston (Pext) is


p1
increased
by
dP
which
reduces the
w nRT ln
volume of the gas. p 2
p1
w 2.303 nRT log
p2

Isothermal irreversible expansion work of an ideal gas


71

Suppose we have an ideal gas contained


in a cylinder with a piston.

This time the process of expansion of the


gas is performed irreversibly i.e., by
instantaneously dropping the external
pressure, Pext, to the final pressure P2.

Isothermal irreversible expansion work of


an ideal gas
72

The work done by the system is now


against the pressure P2 and is expressed:
V2

w Pext dV
V1

w P2 V2 V1

w P2 dV

Maximum work done in reversible expansion


73

(a) The reversible work of expansion; (b) The


irreversible work done by the gas when the external
pressure is at once dropped to the final value .

Maximum work done in reversible


expansion
74

Work done is much less


irreversible expansion than
reversible expansion.

Thus mechanical work is not a state


function as it depends on the path by
which the process is performed rather
than on the initial and final states.

It is a path function.

in
in

the
the

Maximum work done in reversible


expansion
75

Work done in the reversible expansion of a gas is the


maximum work that can be done by a system (gas
This is because:
work always depends on Pext; the larger the Pext the more
work is done by the gas.
But the Pext on the gas cannot be more than the pressure
of the gas, Pgas or a compression will take place. Thus the
largest value Pext can have without a compression taking
place is equal to Pgas. But an expansion that occurs under
these conditions is the reversible expansion.
Thus, maximum work is done in the reversible expansion
of a gas.

Internal energy
76

A thermodynamic system has within itself a


definite quantity of energy.

This energy includes the translation kinetic,


rotational and vibrational energies as well as the
kinetic and potential energy of the nuclei and
electrons within the individual molecules in the
system.

The total of all the possible kinds of energy of a


system, is called its Internal Energy.

Symbol representation of internal energy and sign conventions


77

The internal energy of a system is represented


by the symbol E (Some books use the symbol U).

It is neither possible nor necessary to calculate


the absolute value of internal energy of a
system.

In thermodynamics we are concerned only with


the energy changes when a system changes
from one state to another.

Symbol representation of internal energy


and sign conventions
78

If E be the difference of energy of the


initial state (Ein) and the final state (Ef),
we can write
E = Ef Ein
E is +ve if Ef is greater than Ein and ve
if Ef is less than Ein.
A system may transfer energy to or from
the surroundings as heat or as work, or

Units of internal energy


79

The SI unit for internal energy of a


system is the joule (J).

Another unit of energy which is not an SI


unit is the calorie,
1 cal = 4.184 J.

First law of thermodynamics


80

It states that : the total energy of an


isolated system remains constant though
it may change from one form to another.

The first law of thermodynamics is, in


fact, an application of the broad principle
known as the Law of Conservation of
Energy to the thermodynamic system.

First law of thermodynamics


81

When a system is changed


from state A to state B, it
undergoes a change in the
internal energy from EA to EB.
Thus,
E = EB EA

This energy change is brought


about by the evolution or
absorption of heat and/or by
work being done by the
system.

First law of thermodynamics


82

Because the total energy of the system must


remain constant, we can write the First Law as
:
E = q w
where q = the amount of heat supplied to the system
w = work done by the system

Thus First Law may also be stated as: the net


energy change of a closed system is equal to
the heat transferred to the system minus the
work done by the system.

Other definitions of first law of thermodynamics


83

1)

2)

3)

Whenever energy of a particular type


disappears equivalent amount of another
type must be produced.
Total energy of a system and surroundings
remains constant (or conserved)
It is impossible to construct a perpetual
motion machine that can produce work
without spending energy on it.

Some special forms of first law of thermodynamics


84

Mathematical statement of the First law


of Thermodynamics is
E = q w

Case 1 : For a cyclic process involving


isothermal expansion of an ideal gas
E = 0
q=w

Some special forms of first law of


thermodynamics
85

Case 2 : For an isochoric process (no change


in volume) there is no work of expansion i.e.
w = 0. Hence E = qv

Case 3 : For an adiabatic process there is no


change in heat gained or lost i.e. q = 0.
Hence
E = w
i.e., the decrease in internal energy is exactly
equal to the work done on the system by
surroundings.

Some special forms of first law of


thermodynamics
86

Case 4 : For an isobaric process there is


no change in pressure, i.e. P remains
constant.

Hence
E = q w
E = q PV

Enthalpy of a system
87

In a process carried at constant volume, the heat


content of a system is the same as internal energy
(E), as no PV work is done.

But in a constant-pressure process, the system (a


gas) uses energy in doing PV work. Therefore, the
total heat content of a system at constant pressure
is equivalent to the internal energy E plus the PV
energy. This is called the Enthalpy of the system
and is represented by the symbol H.

Thus enthalpy is defined by the equation :


H = E + PV

Enthalpy A function of state


88

The value of H is dependent on E, P, V


which are all state functions.

Thus, H must also be a function of state.

Hence its value is independent of the


path by which the state of the system is
changed.

Units and sign conventions of enthalpy


89

H = H2 H1

H is positive if H2 > H1 and the process or


reaction will be endothermic.

H is negative if H1 > H2 and the reaction will


be exothermic.
2H2(g) + O2(g)
H2O(l) + 68.32 kcal

The quantity of heat 68.32 kcal on the right


hand represents H of the reaction.

Relation between H and E


90

H = E + PV
H = E + nRT

For the reaction ,


H2F2(g)

H2(g) + F2(g)

H = 14.2 kcal/mole at 25 C
Calculate H for the reaction.

Molar heat capacities


91

Heat capacity of a system is the heat


absorbed by unit mass in raising the
temperature by one degree (K or C) at a
specified temperature.

When mass considered is 1 mole, we can


write

where C is denoted as Molar heat capacity.

Molar heat capacities


92

The molar heat capacity of a system is


defined as the amount of heat required to
raise the temperature of one mole of the
substance (system) by 1 K.

Thus the molar heat capacity may be


defined as the ratio of the amount of heat
absorbed to the rise in temperature.

Units of heat capacity


93

The SI unit is joules per degree per mole


(J K1mol1).

Heat is not a state function, neither is heat


capacity. It is, therefore, necessary to specify
the process by which the temperature was
raised by one degree.

The two types of molar heat capacities are


those : (1) at constant volume; and (2) at
constant pressure.

Molar heat capacity at constant volume (Cv)


94

heat capacity at constant volume is


defined as the rate of change of internal
energy with temperature at constant
volume.
dq = dE + PdV
Dividing both sides
dq by
dEdT,
we
PdVhave

dT
dT

At constant volume dV = 0, we dE
get

Cv

dT

Molar heat capacity at constant pressure, Cp


95

dE
PdV
C

dT
dT

But, H = E + PV
Differentiating w.r.t. T,
dH

dT

.....(i)

dE

dT

Comparing (i) and (ii)


dH
Cp

dT P

dV
P

dT

....(ii)
p

Relation between Cp and Cv


96

At a constant pressure part of heat absorbed by the


system is used up in increasing the internal energy
of the system and the other for doing work by the
system.

While at constant volume the whole of heat


absorbed is utilised in increasing the temperature of
the system as there is no work done by the system.

Thus increase in temperature of the system would


be lesser at constant pressure than at constant
volume. Thus Cp is greater than Cv.

Relation between Cp and Cv


97

Cp Cv R
Cp Cv R
Thus, Cp is greater than Cv by a gas
constant whose value is 8.314 J K1 mol1.
Cp

Cv
For n moles of an ideal gas,
H = n x Cp x (T2 - T1)

Adiabatic expansion of an ideal gas


98

A process carried in a vessel whose walls are


perfectly insulated so that no heat can pass
through them, is said to be adiabatic.

In such a process there is no heat exchange


between a system and surroundings, and q =
0.
E = q w = 0 w
E = w

Adiabatic expansion of an ideal gas


99

For adiabatic expansions,


V1
P2


P1
V2

P1 V1 P2 V2

PV k

Comparison between isothermal and adiabatic expansions


100

PV = constant (Boyles law)


PV = constant (Adiabatic
expansion)

The difference between the two processes is :


in an isothermal process, temperature of a
system remains constant while in an adiabatic
process, temperature must change.

Work done in adiabatic reversible expansion


101

Wmax = P(V2 V1)

Wmax

n R ( T2 T1 )

When T2 > T1, wmax is negative because 1 is


negative. This means that work is done on the
gas.

When T2 < T1, wmax is positive which means


that work is done by the gas.