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REFRIGERANTS

Freon or CFC-12 was used for over thirty


years as a refrigerant in air conditioning
units both in the home and in vehicles.
However, it was found to have an impact on
the ozone layer and in 1994 the EPA enacted
the "Significant New Alternatives Policy"
(SNAP) to find new substitutes for CFC-12.
The EPA lists 15 acceptable alternatives
from pure carbon dioxide to various
mixtures of HCFCs, HFCs and hydrocarbons.

Carbon Dioxide
Pure carbon dioxide can be used in refrigeration and air
conditioning systems that are refitted for the gas. The
EPA designation for carbon dioxide is R-744.

Hydrocarbon Alternatives
Refrigerant gasses containing hydrocarbons such as
butane, isobutane and isopentane have been approved
by the EPA. Limits on the amount of hydrocarbons are
determined by the potential flammability of the
refrigerants. R-426A contains a small percentage of
isopentane. Isobutane is formulated in R-406A/GHG,
GHG-HP, GHG-X4, Hot Shot/ Kar Kool, GHG-X5 and R426A. Butane is found in FrigC, FR-12.

HCFC Refrigerants
HCFCs 22, 124, and 142b are found in many refrigerants.
HCFC 22 is a major component of R-406A/GHG, GHG-HP,
GHG-X4, Hot Shot/Kar Cool, and GHG-X5. HCFC 124 is found
in FRIGC FR-12, GHG-X4, and Hot Shot/Kar Kool. HCFC 142b
is found in Free Zone/RB-276, R-406A/GHG, GHG-HP, GHGX4, Hot Shot/Kar Kool, Freeze 12, GHG-X5, and R-420A.

HFC Refrigerants
Acceptable HFC components include HFC 125, 134a, 152a
and 227ea. Refrigerants containing HFC 125 include R426a, a new formulation of RS-24. HFC-134a is found in R134A, FrigC FR-12, Free Zone/RB-276, Freeze 12, R-420A,
and R-426A. HFC 152a is found in R-152A. HFC 227ea is
found in GHG-X5.

HFC-134A
HFC-134A, chemical name 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane, was developed as a
substitute for CFC-12, also known as dichlorodifluoromethane or R-12, in
automobiles and household refrigerators. The U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency banned the manufacture of CFC-12 in 1995 due to its
contribution to the depletion of the ozone layer. 1,1,1,2Tetrafluoroethane exhibits zero ozone-depletion potential because it
contains no chlorine.

HCFC-22
HCFC-22, also known as chlorodifloromethane or R-22, serves as
the refrigerant in numerous nonautomotive applications,
particularly residential air conditioners and refrigerators. Its
chlorine content, however, makes it a suspected ozone-depleting
agent, and the EPA is currently phasing out its production and
use. By January 1, 2020, all production and import of HCFC-22 will
cease in the United State

HFC-417A
HFC-417A comprises a blend of other
refrigerants, including HFC-134A, and
serves as a direct replacement for HCFC22 in both household and industrial
cooling units because it exhibits
compatibility with all existing
compressor oils.

R11
R11 is a CFC refrigerant, which means it is made of chlorine, fluorine, and carbon. R11
is typically used in the chillers found in office building and hotel air conditioning
systems because it allows large chillers to cool large amounts of water at low costs. In
the past, when air would leak into R11 systems, that air had to be purged, and usually
some of the refrigerant would be lost. Through newer technological advances and
better maintenance, less R11 has been lost in these large chillers.

R22
R22 belongs to the HCFC group of refrigerants, which means it's made of hydrogen,
chlorine, fluorine, and carbon. R22 is the most common refrigerant on the market as it
is used in most residential and commercial air conditioning systems and even in some
large centrifugal chillers. Although it is a popular refrigerant, it will be phased out in
new refrigeration equipment that is made in 2010, and it will stop being produced in
2020.

R422B
R422B is a refrigerant made by ICOR to be similar to the R22 refrigerant. Like the R22
it is made for residential and commercial air conditioners. R422B is an HFC refrigerant,
which means that it is made of hydrogen, fluorine, and carbon. The hydrogen and
carbon in this refrigerant helps oil return in those refrigeration systems that have
mineral oil or alkylbenzene in them. R422B won't mix with these oils, but the hydrogen
and carbon allows the oil to thin out and keep moving in these systems.

R422B
R422B is a refrigerant made by ICOR to be similar to the R22 refrigerant. Like the R22 it is made for residential
and commercial air conditioners. R422B is an HFC refrigerant, which means that it is made of hydrogen,
fluorine, and carbon. The hydrogen and carbon in this refrigerant helps oil return in those refrigeration systems
that have mineral oil or alkylbenzene in them. R422B won't mix with these oils, but the hydrogen and carbon
allows the oil to thin out and keep moving in these systems.

R11
R11 is a CFC refrigerant, which means it is made of chlorine, fluorine, and carbon. R11 is typically used in the
chillers found in office building and hotel air conditioning systems because it allows large chillers to cool large
amounts of water at low costs. In the past, when air would leak into R11 systems, that air had to be purged,
and usually some of the refrigerant would be lost. Through newer technological advances and better
maintenance, less R11 has been lost in these large chillers.

R22
R22 belongs to the HCFC group of refrigerants, which means it's made of hydrogen, chlorine, fluorine, and
carbon. R22 is the most common refrigerant on the market as it is used in most residential and commercial air
conditioning systems and even in some large centrifugal chillers. Although it is a popular refrigerant, it will be
phased out in new refrigeration equipment that is made in 2010, and it will stop being produced in 2020.

R422B
R422B is a refrigerant made by ICOR to be similar to the R22 refrigerant. Like the R22 it is made for residential
and commercial air conditioners. R422B is an HFC refrigerant, which means that it is made of hydrogen,
fluorine, and carbon. The hydrogen and carbon in this refrigerant helps oil return in those refrigeration systems
that have mineral oil or alkylbenzene in them. R422B won't mix with these oils, but the hydrogen and carbon
allows the oil to thin out and keep moving in these systems.

R11
R11 is a CFC refrigerant, which means it is made of chlorine, fluorine, and
carbon. R11 is typically used in the chillers found in office building and
hotel air conditioning systems because it allows large chillers to cool
large amounts of water at low costs. In the past, when air would leak into
R11 systems, that air had to be purged, and usually some of the
refrigerant would be lost. Through newer technological advances and
better maintenance, less R11 has been lost in these large chillers.
R22
R22 belongs to the HCFC group of refrigerants, which means it's made of
hydrogen, chlorine, fluorine, and carbon. R22 is the most common
refrigerant on the market as it is used in most residential and commercial
air conditioning systems and even in some large centrifugal chillers.
Although it is a popular refrigerant, it will be phased out in new
refrigeration equipment that is made in 2010, and it will stop being
produced in 2020.