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DOSTI FOUNDATION

Munir Ahmad, MD Chair Jessica Weinberg, JD, Publicity and Communications Coordinator www.dosti.org 419-535-3214

Mission Statement
The Dosti Foundation strives to make education, permeated with human values, available in parts of the world where it otherwise would not be available, due to economic depression or political oppression.
Universal and non-discriminatory approach not purposely or permanently limited to Pakistan

Why?
Giving other young people the same chance that Dr. Ahmad had to rise out of poverty through education
started out by helping students individually
‡ About 60% of Pakistani people live on less than $2.00/day ‡Education empowers people to rise out of poverty ‡By lifting people out of poverty we can prevent exploitive labor, human trafficking, and political oppression ‡By keeping people from being poor and desperate we can keep them from joining with the militant forces that attack the United States. Children who have not been educated by us are vulnerable to being indoctrinated by the Taliban and the like. Families turn to madrasas (fundamentalist schools) for education only when there is no other option for education

PAKISTAN

Indus Civilization

2500 B.C.

Cultural heritage
‡Indus Valley civilization, dating back at least 5000 years ‡2nd millennium B.C.: Indus fused with Indo-Aryan peoples ‡Persians, Greeks, Scythians, Afghans, and Turks all ruled at one time ‡Arabs brought Islam ‡ The Mughal Empire flourished in the 16th and 17th centuries

Full List of Empires and Dynasties
Soanian People ca. 500,000 Mehrgarh Culture 7000-2800 Indus Valley Civilization 3300-1700 Vedic Civilization 2000 600 Indo-Greek Kingdom 250BC 10AD Gandhara Civilization 200BC-1000AD Indo-Scythian Kingdom 200BC-400AD Indo-Parthian Kingdom 21 130 Kushan Empire 60 375 Rai dynasty 489 632 Umayyad Caliphate 661-750 Pala Empire 770 850 Ghaznavid Empire 963 1187 Mamluk dynasty 1206-1290 Khilji dynasty 1290-1320 Tughlaq dynasty 1320-1413 Sayyid dynasty 1414-1451 Lodhi dynasty 1451-1526 Mughal Empire 1526 1858 Durrani Empire 1747 1823 Sikh Empire 1733 1849 British Indian Empire 1849-1947 Dominion of Pakistan 1947-1956 Became a Republic in 1956, and the Islamic Republic of Pakistan in 1973

INFLUENCE OF RELIGION
Constitution signed in 1973, under leadership of Zulfikar Ali Bhutto proclaimed Islamic Republic of Pakistan.

Present-day Pakistan
Source: CIA World Factbook, 2009 (unless otherwise noted)
‡ Population: Just under 175 mil total as of 2009 Age breakdown: ‡ 24% of population (about 40 mil), was 10-19 as of 2007 (United Nations Development Program) ‡ about 38% of population was under 15 in 2009 according to Kaiser Family Global Health Facts. More youth than there has been before. ‡ Gender ratio: pretty close to 50/50 Literacy: (age 15 and over can read and write) total population: 49.9% male: 63% female: 36% (2005 est.) One in three school-age children not attending school; a third of those who do drop out by fifth grade. ( Sabrina
Tavernise, Pakistan s Islamic Schools Fill Void, New York Times May 3, 2009.)

Less than half of females ages 15-24 had ever been to school (Population Council, 2006)
Ethnic make-up (general): Punjabi 44.68%, Pashtun (Pathan) 15.42%, Sindhi 14.1%, Sariaki 8.38%, Muhajirs 7.57%, Balochi 3.57%, other 6.28%

Child Labor
‡ Children forced into labor to pay ³inherited´ family debts - mostly in carpet-making, brick-making, or agriculture (illegal, but allowed to occur) 3.5 mil children estimated to be working in 2004 Children are vulnerable to trafficking for labor and prostitution; trafficking separates families They may be reduced to begging and scrounging the garbage

‡ ‡

‡

Source: Back to [Qaumi Yak Jahti - Folk Consensus - Vol. 2, No. 4 (7 May 2004)]

Child labor (cont.)

Sanding a chair: $5.00 for 50-hour work week

Car wash

Delivering tea

Child labor (cont.) child garbage workers

Significance of NWFP
‡Trade ‡Military movements ‡Political turmoil of Afghanistan affects Pakistan

Federally Administered Tribal Areas

Pakistan /Afghanistan / USA
Strategic international world hot-spot

Aid from U.S. to Pakistan in millions, constant 2008 $US Source: US Overseas Loans & Grants [Greenbook]
Program I. Total Economic Assistance A. USAID and Predecessor Economic Support Fund/Security Support Assistance Development Assistance Child Survival and Health Other USAID Assistance B. Department of Agriculture Food Aid Title I Title II Title III Section 416(b)/Commodity Credit Corporation Food for Progress Food for Education Other USDA Assistance C. State Department Global Health and Child Survival Global HIV/AIDS Initiative Narcotics Control Migration and Refugee Assistance Nonproliferation, Anti-Terrorism, Demining and Related Other State Assistance D. Other Economic Assistance Millennium Challenge Corporation Peace Corps Department of Defence Security Assistance Other Active Grant Programs Inactive Programs II. Total Military Assistance III. Total Economic and Military Assistance Non-Concessional U.S. Loans Export-Import Bank Loans OPIC and Other Non-Concessional U.S. Loans Annual Obligations to International Organizations (Assessed) 1998 100.7 6.6 2.1 3.9 0.7 . 83.4 83.4 12.5 5.7 . 65.2 . . 3.1 . . 2.8 0.2 . 0.2 7.6 . . 2.4 5.2 . 0.2 100.9 83.1 83.1 . . 2000 45.1 . . . . . 28.8 28.8 28.2 0.7 . . . . 9.6 . . 4.0 5.4 . 0.2 6.6 . . 1.1 5.5 . . 45.1 . . . . 2001 224.7 0.5 . 0.0 . 0.5 108.6 108.6 12.0 2.2 . 88.1 6.3 . 102.7 . . 91.6 10.8 . 0.3 12.9 . . 0.2 12.8 . . 224.7 . . . . 2002 921.4 732.1 714.2 11.7 5.2 1.0 47.6 47.6 11.7 6.1 . 29.7 . . 128.7 . . 106.3 10.2 11.9 0.3 13.0 . . 0.7 12.3 . 347.6 1,269.0 241.7 . 241.7 . 2003 371.7 280.2 219.2 39.9 19.3 1.7 35.0 35.0 20.1 7.7 . . 7.2 . 44.9 . . 35.7 7.9 0.8 0.5 11.6 . . 0.0 11.6 . 304.2 675.9 . . . . 2004 399.3 311.3 226.1 55.1 28.7 1.4 24.5 24.3 . 14.9 . 9.3 . 0.2 48.2 . . 35.7 6.5 5.5 0.5 15.4 . . 1.5 13.9 . 95.6 495.0 . . . . 2005 482.5 368.0 311.1 32.0 22.8 2.1 6.6 6.6 . . . 0.2 6.4 . 83.2 . . 67.8 6.4 7.2 1.7 24.6 . . 10.0 14.7 . 341.4 823.9 17.7 . 17.7 . 2006 681.9 480.7 334.9 39.7 30.4 75.7 50.3 50.3 12.6 19.1 . 5.5 13.1 . 22.5 . . . 10.8 9.8 2.0 128.4 . . 114.1 14.3 . 324.7 1,006.7 . . . . 2007 678.8 491.8 360.1 99.6 24.3 7.8 10.0 10.0 . . . . 10.0 . 40.0 . . 23.0 4.2 7.8 5.0 137.0 . . 37.9 99.0 . 319.4 998.2 34.8 . 34.8 . 2008 605.4 386.2 341.6 31.1 0.0 13.6 2.6 2.6 . 2.6 . . 0.0 . 59.8 29.5 . 22.4 4.4 0.8 2.7 156.8 . . 71.9 84.9 . 358.1 963.5 5.0 . 5.0 .

Typical School
‡ Starts as a single room often grows

Dosti schools
‡ About a dozen ‡ Some we ve started in the past have become independent or merged with government schools
‡ Curriculum: That prescribed by the Provincial Government and Local Boards of Education, (meaning graduates easily qualify for admission to other schools) with the difference that English is taught from day one.

By the numbers (2009-10)
12 schools 4 female principals About 2000 students and 100 teachers total Per school can range from 50 to a couple of hundred 2009 numbers showed that about half the schools had 50% or more female student population ‡ Many one-rooms, but the following have 10-15 rooms Abdara, Kalu Shah, Sufaid Dheri; schools in Badazia ‡ Most go up to 6th or 7th grade, a few go up to 9th grade ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡

(these numbers change because economic and political circumstances can impact who uses the schools)

Other activities
‡ Recreation
Picnics and outdoor trips Cricket teams

Skill development for women
‡ Sewing, knitting, embroidery and such ‡ Graduates are presented with sewing machines they can use to make money on their own

‡ Basic Education for domestic servants
Collaboration with International Labor Organization

Health care
Clinic Collaboration in Khazana village Eye clinics with Rotary International
We d like to hire ob-gyns for hospitals: only 40% of young women seek health care during their first pregnancy (Population Council)

Earthquake relief
‡ Pakistan 2005: On the morning of October 8th, an earthquake measuring 7.6 on the Richter Scale struck Kashmir and Northwest Frontier Province of Pakistan. ‡Health care ‡Food ‡Shelter ‡schools Dosti also collaborated with HUT Outreach on fundraiser for the relief effort after the 2010 earthquake in Haiti

Ultimate goal is to focus on education
‡ Schools
Competitions: art, debates, poetry Lectures about rights issues

‡ Colleges ‡ Computer Learning Centers ‡ Clubs

Abdara school awards day

Child abuse awareness at Sufaid Dheri, Dec 2008

Kalu Shah student body pose in front of school

Class at Sufaid Dheri Colgate My Bright Smile Drawing Contest (Sufaid Dheri)

Supporting Dosti Financially:
Exchange rate makes a few American $$ significant in Pakistan
‡One child¶s education: $2.00-3.00 a month ‡Ideal teacher¶s salary: $100 per month ‡Other expenses for a single-class: $50 per month ‡ Two small, one-teacher schools: $124 total per month ‡Big schools, with 10-15 rooms and a couple hundred students cost $200-300 a month to run ‡Staff and board donate most expenses for USA fundraising: office space, supplies for literature A recurring monthly pledge is best, even if the recurring monthly amount is small. Shipping to Pakistan is expensive, so in-kind donations (goods) are impractical.

Shop for Dosti: Get Something for Your Donation
Shop for Dosti link is on the web site Two sweat-shot free companies: Global Goods Partners (handicrafts and accessories) http://www.globalgoodspartners.org/template/contact.cfm Follow this link to see Dosti·s name No Sweat! (clothing and footwear) www.nosweatshop.com Look for the logo
‡www.krogercommunityrewards.com

Other ways to help
‡ If you are able to travel to Pakistan, we welcome lecturers and teachers for our schools ‡Host presentation ‡Share literature ‡Booth at your event ‡Low-cost fundraiser
Bake sale? Garage sale? Car wash? Pajamas for Pakistan*

Who has already helped us raise money?
‡Girls, Inc of the YWCA of Dayton ‡Crissey Elementary School (Holland)* ‡Rotary International, and Rotaries in Massachusetts ‡Pan-Pacific Southeast Asian Women s Association of Toledo ‡Asia Foundation donated books

Making a Difference
Left: Dosti helped Barekhna s family get glasses for her
Right: Masood Khan, father of Muhammed Zarshad (shown above), moved his family to the Sufaid Dheri village so his children could attend the Dosti school there

Left: The daughters of Iqbal Zafar, who is disabled, believe Dosti will make it possible for them to support their family. Right: Javeed Iqbal has put himself through higher education by teaching at a Dosti school