Principles of Our Offense

Our offense is designed for PERFORMANCE. Performance is easier said than done, so we want to ensure we equip ourselves with as many tools to ensure that each play is run with the utmost efficiency, increasing our rate of success and reducing the amount of things that could go wrong. To do this, we will live by one simple tenet on offense; “Not only do we have to do things RIGHT, We have to do it better than our competition!”. 1.No shortcuts to success – We will be play fundamental football Fundamentals of offensive football are blocking, catching, and running. Practice doesn’t make perfect, Perfect Practice makes perfect! If you sure of your assignment on a play, the chances of you fouling it up under the pressure of competition is not likely. We will only run plays that we have mastered in practice. Expecting a result on game night that we haven’t developed to a degree of proficiency or confidence is a recipe for disaster. If you cannot make a practice, you are limiting your ability to execute on game day, and lessen your value as a trustworthy contributor to our team’s success. “There is only one way to do anything: The Right Way”. Golda Meir, Prime Minister of Israel 2. Playing to our strengths / advantage We will play the cards we are dealt to our advantage. The “cards” we will have on any play will be WHEN the play starts (cadence) and WHERE the ball is going (play call). To increase our productivity even more, we will use our opponent’s limitations to our own advantage. Our opponents have as little time to prepare for us, as we for them. They4 can only prepare for a few of the concepts we will present them with. Because their “football experience” may not differ that much from our own, they will only be good at only one or two different defenses. With of our formations, shifts, and motions, we will take them out of their comfort zone and make them adjust to US. WE will dictate what defense they present us ( by what formation we give them ) and instill as much anxiety and apprehension as possible before the ball is snapped. “Rapidity is the essence of war; take advantage of the enemy’s uneasiness, make your way by unexpected routes, and attack unguarded spots.” – Sun-Tzu, The Art of War 3. Don’t make the game harder than it has to be - Keeping concepts simple Our offense is meant to LOOK complicated, but be extremely simple. It will not require phenomenal athletes or dominating strength – it will require a desire to learn and compete. Our playbook is designed to marry a few similar techniques together and utilizing these in various ways. The bottom line is getting the football in the hands of players and setting them up to be able to make those plays without any extraordinary effort. Variations from our base plays can attack defenses in different ways and look like an entirely different play, but won’t change up assignments of the players executing it (limiting the possibility of ‘forgetting / blowing an assignment’). It will be the coaches job to put the players in positions to make plays. It will be the player’s job to execute. The less critical thinking required at “crunch time” the more likely that player will execute aggressively and confidently. “FUN football leads to optimistic football, which proceeds into positive football that gives birth to winning football.” - Coach Glen “Tiger” Ellison 4. We will prepare for the WORST case scenario Being proactive through preparation is the best way to avoid making a bad situation worse. We understand that there may be situations where our opponent has dedicated themselves to outperforming us in our base plays, that is their job. It is our job to be able to execute a plan that provides us an ‘escape’ in that event. If our run game is stopped, we will have a solution in the pass game that emphasizes our personnel strengths and minimizes our liabilities. Knowing you have an “ace in the hole” ready, lends itself to prevent you from being unnerved in a frustrating situation (maintaining your focus). “Win the war, then fight the war.” – Sun-Tzu, The Art of War

Principles of Our Run Game

We will excel at three basic plays that require neither superior physical strength nor considerable football knowledge. We have designed this offense to make our job of advancing the football for first downs and touchdowns as effortless as possible while at the same time, making it extremely difficult for a defense to get comfortable in recognizing what we are doing on a given play. This hesitation on the defense will prevent them from being over aggressive in attacking our formations and allow us an opportunity to make plays. The backbone of our offense this year will be the Zone series that requires an initial push from the offensive line moving together, allowing four blockers on two defenders to the side of the play (number superiority). Instead of one designated hole for the runner to run through, they will have two easily visible creases to choose from. From the base zone play, we can add several wrinkles to it by tagging specific assignments for different looks and by progressing to a wide zone play, known as “stretch”. Our Veer series is an extremely quick hitting inside run play that is centered around attacking the alignment of a defense by running to where the widest gap remains in the defensive front (the ‘bubble’). This play leaves one defender unblocked who cannot tackle all of the three potential ball carriers. For the sake of efficiency, we will call the ball carrier out rather than having the quarterback make reads or decisions on how to distribute the ball. As our proficiency with this play increases, we can add more dimensions to this play to fully realize its multidimensional threat (with the quarterback, ace back, and misdirection). Our Jet series is another play that is designed to attack an area of the field faster than the defense can assemble bodies to the ball carrier (number superiority). Jet is a speed sweep where any one of three ball carriers will go in lateral motion before the snap then take the handoff while in stride for an immediate gain near one side of the field without having to make any cuts or avoiding defenders. After developing a high level of execution with the basic jet play, we can build off this series with misdirection, reverses, screens, and passes to further stress defenses. All of these basic runs have variations built in to them to attack any defense’s weakness to over pursuing the original play in the series. All of these plays can be run from a host of formations we will run this year. All of these run series offer complimentary play-action passes to take advantage of areas of the field that defenses will vacate by aggressively attempting to stop our run game (without over complicating throws or routes). Each boot-action play initiates the base run play, then “boots” (reverses the side of the field we are attacking) to take advantage of aggressive pursuit by the defense.

2007 Offensive Goals

2007 IWFL MidSouth Division Champions
•Finish in the league’s Top 10 in scoring offense •Lead the division in rushing yards •Team Rushes for more than 1,600 yards •Complete 62% or greater passes •Convert greater than 29% of 3rd downs •>20% conversion on 3rd & 7+ yds •>45% conversion on 3rd & 2 – 6 yds •>79% conversion on 3rd & 1 yds •Less than 10 offensive turnovers for the season

Q –Quarterback – 1 F –Full back - 2 A –Ace back - 3 Z T Y G A C G

Z – Slot Receiver – 4 Y –Tight (Strong End) X = Split End (Weak End) X T F

Huddle Rules
1 – NOBODY talks in the huddle, but the quarterback

Q

2 – Linemen face the ball seven yards deep with knees slightly bent 3 – Offensive backs and receivers line up behind the linemen facing the quarterback0

Alignment

2’ 24”

1.5’ 18”

1.5’ 18”

1.5’ 18”

1.5’ 18”

2’ 24”

Holes

9

7

5

3

2

4

6

8

Gaps

D

C

B

A

A

B

C

D

Motion Locations
9 7 5 3 1 2 4 6 8

Designated player is tagged after the formation is declared and on cadence that player will move laterally to the location tagged. (ex. Ace - Z9 - 34 zone) line up in Ace, on cadence Z motions to ‘9’ (across formation) then ball is snapped..

Shifts
“Pop” – Designates a complete formation shift after aligning in another.
(ex. Ace Left – pop – Kings 34 zone) line up in Ace Left, on cadence backs then shift into Kings formation..

“Trade” – Y lines up by strength, then realigns on the opposite side.
(ex. Strong – Trade – 34 Zone) line up in Strong formation, on cadence Y realigns on the left side of the formation.

FORMATIONS
X Q F Y Z

ALWAYS to the Right, unless declared “Left”. Y & Z to strength / X & F away from strength (unless tagged otherwise)

X F Q

Y Z

A A

I
X Z Q F A A Y X F Q Y

Ace
Z

I Over
Y Q F Q F F A A Y X Q

Ace Tight
Y A Z

Weak
X Z Q

Strong
X F A Z A Q

Kings

Y

Y

F

Empty

Queens

34 / 35

ZONE SERIES

X

LT

LG

C QB F A

RG

RT

Y Z

FORMATIONS:

I– ACE – GUN –

"Zone" will serve as our base running play that is effective both strong and weak to get a vertical push with the ball. 'Zone' offers us two double-teams playside and affords our runner two options to gain positive yardage. From 'zone', all other running and passing plays are variations off the look that this play gives a defense. Offensive Linemen PST Drive step to overtake playside "D" gap PSG Drive step to overtake playside "C" gap C Drive step to overtake playside "B" gap BSG Drive step OR CUT to overtake playsdie "A" gap BST Drive step OR CUT to overtake backside "A" gap - if no defender, cut backside linebacker Recievers and Backs Open at a steep 5 O'Clock and give to back. Continue a full speed bootleg to opposite "D" gap to Q hold DE / OLB. F A Y Z X Open flat and look to block first outside defender in backside "C" gap - block any penetration first along route. Take first step laterally reading the 1st playside down defender. If his helmet goes inside, push the vertical seam immediately. If his helmet goes outside, cut back just inside of him. Make one cut and GO! Reach gap to play call,. If no near threat, "chip" to near backer or safety Downfield block near defender. Downfield block near safety.

48 / 49

JET SERIES

Y Z

LT

LG

C QB F A

RG

RT

X

FORMATIONS: I ACE GUN EMPTY -

"Jet" is our speed sweep series to allow individuals to reach the perimeter as fast as possible and isolate mismatched force defenders. We will put the ball carrier in motion before the snap and have the ball hiked once the runner reaches the backside tackle. Jet sweep is a perfect way to run the ball, especially when defenses stack the box. The presnap motion will lend itself to forcing defenses to adjust their numbers on one side of the ball - we will attack the side with the least amount of defenders from jet motion. Jet can be run by Z, A, or F to strong or weak sides.
Offensive Linemen PST Reach playside C gap PSG Reach playside B gap C Reach playside A gap BSG Release upfield immediately to cut off backer BST Release upfield immediately to cut off backside backer Recievers and Backs Snap ball once ball carrier reaches backside tackle and open up to them and handoff with inside Q hand. Continue running full speed on bootleg action away from play gaining width and depth. F A Y You will block force playside. Once the ball is hiked, shoot immediately to playside "D" gap looking to seal / cut off first defender on the perimeter. Open up away from the call and wall off the backside "C" gap defender. Release upfield to cut off deep safety If ball carrier - you are in motion, looking to reach 3/4 speed by the time you reach near tackle. Receive the handoff and achieve full speed at playside tackle and head at a 45 degree angle for the field numbers - look to cut upfield once the playside sa Push vertically from the snap and look to crack on playside safety.

Z X

24 / 25

VEER SERIES

X

LT

LG

C QB F A

RG

RT

Y Z

FORMATIONS:

I– ACE – GUN –

We can run veer out of any 1+ back set. We use veer to gain a quick three yards and threaten the edge of a defense. Veer works best when the edge player over commits to our perimeter run game, leaving us with a numbers advantage inside without having to block one defender. We run veer to the 1 technique / center shade (nose) side of the defensive front. Offensive Linemen PST Down block to first defender (inside linebacker) PSG Down block / double team first down lineman to your side of the ball C Post / double team first playside down linememan BSG Down block / hinge block away from playside BST Down block / hinge block away from playside Recievers and Backs Take one step to playside and handoff ball to fullback. Continue down the line staying parallel to the Q line of scrimmage (attacking edge lineman). F A Y Z X Step playside and immediately receive handoff. Aiming point is for the inside foot of the playside tackle. Make no cuts / redirection until you are past the linebackers. Step playside and continue laterally in an option-pitch relationship with the quarterback. Release vertical upfield to block backside pursuit player. Press vertically 6 yards then release inside to block backside force player. Press vertically 6 yards then release inside to block force player.

Using formations for match ups

Protection

LT

LG

C QB

RG

RT

LT

LG

C QB

RG

RT

B

B

90 (right) protection

190 (left) protection

Quick passing game will consist of a two-digit called system. The first number indicates the protection used, the second number ( 0 – 9 ) indicate the route structure. The digit “0” will be for called routes. All two-digit packaged plays will indicate this is a right oriented read / play. We will use turn back protection AWAY from the call. Therefore, a two-digit route structure would be TO the right, requiring protection to protect the backside (left). The remaining back(s) would release TO the call side in protection. Conversely, a three-digit packaged route would be to the LEFT. It would be oriented to the left and be read to the left. The backside now becomes the right side. The line would turn back to the right and the remaining back(s) would protect to the left. 1 = Hitch 2 = Out 3 = Slant 4 = Stop 5 = Turn 6 = Smash 7 = Post / Short 8 = Fade

“B” tag = backside designation to run a route package contrary to the ‘callside’ package

Quick Passing Game
“seam” “get open” 6 yds “seam”

6 yds

LT 1 2

LG

C QB

RG

RT 3 2 1

91 / 191 Hitch
The Hitch will be run by the widest receiver (#1) regardless of position. The receiver will read the alignment of the corner. If the corner’s feet are 6 yards or deeper, the receiver will convert the route to a fade route. The receiver will press the corner vertically then make a sharp break outside at 6 yards depth to the fade on the top of the sideline numbers. The receiver should look for the ball on their outside shoulder outside the sideline numbers. The second receiver from the sideline (#2) will run the seam route up the field. The second receiver is responsible for clearing the 2nd defensive player from the outside and press the vertical seam. If the receiver is re-routed or jammed, they must work to get their release and remain inside their original seam lane. If the 2nd defender turns their shoulders outside (to take away the hitch) the 2nd receiver should turn their shoulders inside and look for the football immediately. The tight receiver or 3rd receiver (if present) will run a “get open” route that breaks at a depth of 7 yards. The receiver can break into any route anywhere within the ‘tackle box’ from a depth of 8 yards to 15 yards, so long as they do not interfere with the seam route being run to their outside.Ideally, we would like the #3 receiver to attack the middle of the field. These route packages are mirrored (duplicated on each side) and the quarterback will be given the side of the field to read. The quarterback is reading the alignment of the corner. If the corner is tighter than 5 yards, the #1 receiver will automatically convert to a fade route and that is the route we want to throw outside the sideline numbers.We want to throw hitches against loose or “soft” corners (corners who align deeper than 5 yards from the outside receiver). The quarterback’s primary read on the Hitch route is the #2 defender (flat defender). The quarterback reads the shoulders of this player. If the defender’s (#2) shoulders stay parallel (basically back pedaling) we want to hit the hitch on the third (plant) step. If the defender’s (#2) shoulders turn and get outside of the seam receiver (getting into the lane of the hitch route), the quarterback should immediately throw to the seam receiver.

Quick Passing Game
“seam” “get open”
6 yds 4 yds

“seam”

6 yds 4 yds

LT 1 2

LG

C QB

RG

RT 3 2 1

92 / 192 Quick Out
The Quick / Speed Out will be run by the widest receiver (#1) regardless of position. The receiver will read the alignment of the corner. If the corner’s feet are 6 yards or deeper, the receiver will convert the route to a fade route. The receiver will press the corner vertically then make an elongated release, starting at 4 yards depth. attacking the outside shoulder of the corner. At a depth of 6 yards the receiver should make the distinct break outside, flat, parallel to the line of scrimmage, squaring up to the quarterback. The second receiver from the sideline (#2) will run the seam route up the field. The second receiver is responsible for clearing the 2nd defensive player from the outside and press the vertical seam. If the receiver is re-routed or jammed, they must work to get their release and remain inside their original seam lane. If the 2nd defender turns their shoulders outside (to take away the out / flat) the 2nd receiver should turn their shoulders inside and look for the football immediately. The tight receiver or 3rd receiver (if present) will run a “get open” route that breaks at a depth of 7 yards. The receiver can break into any route anywhere within the ‘tackle box’ from a depth of 8 yards to 15 yards, so long as they do not interfere with the seam route being run to their outside.Ideally, we would like the #3 receiver to attack the middle of the field. These route packages are mirrored (duplicated on each side) and the quarterback will be given the side of the field to read. The quarterback is reading the alignment of the corner. If the corner is tighter than 5 yards, the #1 receiver will automatically convert to a fade route and that is the route we want to throw outside the sideline numbers.We want to throw outs against loose or “soft” corners (corners who align deeper than 5 yards from the outside receiver). The quarterback’s primary read on the out route is the #2 defender (defender over the second receiver). The quarterback reads the shoulders of this player. If the defender’s (#2) shoulders stay parallel (basically back pedaling) we want to hit the quick out on the third (plant) step. If the defender’s (#2) shoulders turn and get outside of the seam receiver (getting into the lane of the out route), the quarterback should immediately throw to the seam receiver.

Quick Passing Game

slant

slant

slant

6 yds 5 yds

6 yds

shoot
LT 1 2 LG C QB RG RT 3 2 1

shoot

93 / 193 Slant
The Slant will be run by the widest receiver (#1) regardless of position. There is no conversion of these routes in this package. The out-most receivers in this package run a route that begins with an outside stemming / vertical pressing release, then a sharp and distinct break towards the inside (heading toward the far side goal post). Both the #1 receivers will run a on outside releasing stem, then breaking inside at 6 yards while the 2nd receiver to the three receiver side will also run the slant,except at a shallower depth. The 3rd receiver ‘strong’ or the 2nd receiver ‘weak’ (basically the inside-most receiver on your side) will run the ‘shoot’ route. This route is a two step and break version of the quick out route. Against man coverage we would like to press the defender vertically first to create greater separation as we break to the sideline. Again, the quarterback reads the defender over the second receiver. If the defender’s (#2) shoulders stay parallel (basically back pedaling) we want to hit the shoot on the third (plant) step. If the defender’s (#2) shoulders turn and get outside of the seam receiver (getting into the lane of the out route), the quarterback should immediately throw to the slant as the receiver turns into the break.

Quick Passing Game
fade seam fade

break out

6 yds

break out
6 yds

LT 1 2

LG

C QB

RG

RT 3 2 1

98 / 198 Fade
The Fade will be run by the widest receiver (#1) regardless of position. There is no conversion of this route.The outmost receivers in this package run a route that begins with an inside stem to create a greater cushion between the deep defender and the sideline. The 3rd receiver ‘strong’ or the 2nd receiver ‘weak’ (basically the inside-most receiver on your side) will run the ‘break out’ route. This route is an inside pressing vertical stem, which makes a sharp break flat to the sideline at a depth of 6 yards. Against man coverage we would like to press the defender vertically first to create greater separation as we break to the sideline. These route packages are mirrored (duplicated on each side) and the quarterback will be given the side of the field to read. The quarterback is reading the alignment of the corner. If the corner is tighter than 5 yards, the quarterback will throw the fade route. The seam route of the #2 ‘strong’ receiver holds the deep safety from helping on coverage of the fade. If the corner is deeper than 6 yards, the quarterback again has the option of reading the defender over the #2 receiver. If the defender’s (#2) shoulders stay parallel (basically back pedaling) we want to hit the break out on the third (plant) step. If the defender’s (#2) shoulders turn and get outside of the seam receiver (getting into the lane of the out route), the quarterback should immediately throw to the seam receiver.

Quick Passing Game

slant

slant

slant

6 yds 6 yds 5 yds

short
LT 1 2 LG C QB RG RT 3 2

short

1

97/ 197 Short
The premise of this package is to use the width of the field to our advantage pitting two receivers against one defender, namely the defender over the #2 receiver. We want to make sure that whatever formation we align in, we align with the field width in mind, exaggerating the split between receivers, so that the next available defender is a great distance away.

The #1 receiver will run the “short” route, with the intention of replacing the position of the #2 defender at a depth of 3 – 4 yards. The receiver will attempt to get to this position as fast as possible, then throttle down to look for the ball or another crease in the coverage. Versus man coverage, we want this receiver to ‘stem’ or give an outside move to generate separation between themselves and the #1 defender. The #2 receiver(s) will each run a “Post” pattern, breaking at 6 yards depth and heading for the opposite side of the field goal post. If there is a #3 receiver, they will run the exact same route, only breaking shallower at 5 yards. The quarterback will take a 3 step drop (or even a quick 2 step) and read the #2 defender. If the #2 defender retreats, open / turns shoulders to take the #2 receiver, the ball must be immediately fired to the #1 receiver. If the #2 defender opens their shoulders away or comes to the line of scrimmage, the ball will be fired to the #2 receiver, breaking on the post.

Quick Passing Game

“quick smash”
7 yds

“quick smash” “get open”
7 yds

“hitch”
6 yds

“hitch”
6 yds

LT 1 2

LG

C QB

RG

RT 3 2 1

96 / 196 Quick Smash
This package is meant to marry the concepts of 90 / 191 Hitch but adjusted to victimize cover 2 type coverage.

The #1 receiver will run the hitch without a read – they will run ONLY the 6 yard hitch. The receiver will run the 6 yard stem then plant and whip their head around to receive the hitch pass. The #2 receiver will run a route identical to their “seam” route, but will make an aggressive plant and cut at 7 yards to the outside. The aiming point for the “quick smash” for the #2 receiver is the difference between the deep #1 defender and the short #1 defender. The tight receiver or 3rd receiver (if present) will run a “get open” route that breaks at a depth of 7 yards. The receiver can break into any route anywhere within the ‘tackle box’ from a depth of 8 yards to 15 yards, so long as they do not interfere with the seam route being run to their outside.Ideally, we would like the #3 receiver to attack the middle of the field. The quarterback takes their 3 step drop and reads the play side corner. If the corner backs up or gives ground up at all, the ball is to be fired to the hitch. If the corner presses or remains shallow on our #1 receiver, the ball should be placed between the deep (safety) defender and #1 (shallow corner) defender to that side

Quick Passing Game
fade slant slant
6 yds

turn
6 yds

shoot
LT 1 2 LG C QB RG RT 3 2 1

95 / 195 Turn
This package that provides us with an answer against the coverages that we will face that are geared to stop our hitch passes as well as attacking the weaker pass defenders on the field (the linebackers). This package allows us to get rid of the football as quickly as possible. This package is different than any other because it is not mirrored. There are front side routes and backside routes. The backside receiver(s) run slants. The front side receivers (3) run their various routes. If only two receivers are to the call side, the remaining back will run the #3 route. If there are two backs in the backfield, the “A” back will initiate the #3 route. The #1 receiver runs a fade. Because of this, they should line up wider than any other formation to isolate the play side corner at a width of 16 – 18 yards. We want to press vertically from the snap to cut the corner off from breaking on any underneath routes. The #2 receiver, or the next receiver from the sideline, runs the “turn” route. It is important that this receiver is able to get off the line of scrimmage with little or no interference (re routing / jamming). If we cannot get off the press from the #2 defender, we have no route. Getting up field at a depth of 6 yards, they will simply turn around and look for the ball. Once turned, the receiver can flatten out toward the sideline. Once the receiver catches and secure the pass, they are to pivot and turn and get UP field immediately. The #3 receiver or the inside most receiver, takes one or two steps from the line of scrimmage then aiming (shooting) for 4 yards depth to the sideline. Once reaching the ‘flat’ part of the route, the receiver snaps their head around to look for the ball. Once securing the ball, the receiver turns up field down the sideline. The quarterback will take a 3 step drop and again read the #2 defender. If the #2 defender WIDENS (to the shoot), then the “turn” route is open and the ball must be fired immediately to the #2 receiver’s outside shoulder pad.. If the #2 defender’s shoulder turn and he hangs in the area, the quarterback fires the shoot route immediately.

Quick Passing Game
“seam”
9 – 10 yds

“seam”
9 - 10 yds

“get open”

LT 1 2

LG

C QB

RG

RT 3 2 1

94 / 194 Stop
The “Stop” package is extremely similar to the the 98/198 Fade package, but differs with the #1 receiver running the “stop” / deep drop out. Nothing should look different to the difference, and we want the #1 receiver to sell the fade route, then drop out at the last minute. The #1 receiver will run the vertical pressing fade route to a depth of 9 –10 yards, then violently whip their head around, stopping to break back outside toward the sideline and toward the quarterback The second receiver from the sideline (#2) will run the seam route up the field. The second receiver is responsible for clearing the 2nd defensive player from the outside and press the vertical seam. If the receiver is re-routed or jammed, they must work to get their release and remain inside their original seam lane. If the 2nd defender turns their shoulders outside (to take away the hitch) the 2nd receiver should turn their shoulders inside and look for the football immediately. The tight receiver or 3rd receiver (if present) will run a “get open” route that breaks at a depth of 7 yards. The receiver can break into any route anywhere within the ‘tackle box’ from a depth of 8 yards to 15 yards, so long as they do not interfere with the seam route being run to their outside.Ideally, we would like the #3 receiver to attack the middle of the field. These route packages are mirrored (duplicated on each side) and the quarterback will be given the side of the field to read. The quarterback should deliver the ball to the outside armpit of the #1 receiver at a depth of 9 yards.

Introducing in-depth concepts of sprint-out pass game, play-action passes, and run game variations.

ZONE / STRETCH BOOT PASS

ZONE SERIES

X

LT

LG

C QB F A

RG

RT

Y Z

Just like the zone/stretch pass, we want to take advantage of over-aggressive defenses that are trying to stop our base runs. However, with the tag 'BOOT' we are going opposite of the called run. If we call a run to the left, we are going to be passing to the right. By 'booting' away from the run action, we are putting pressure on the defense to defend the length and width of the field while attempting to stop our base runs.

FORMATIONS: I ACE GUN EMPTY -

Receiver PS No.1 PS No.2 PS No.3 BS No.1 BS No.2 BS No.3 QB

Route ‘Corner’   ’Whip’
(if applicable)

Coaching Points
Hard inside release to 8 – 12 yards, then a sharp 45 degree break to the deep sideline Hard inside release to a depth of 6 yards, then whip back inside and towards the sideline at the same depth.

 NA  ’Post’ ‘Drag’  ‘Drag’ 
(if applicable) Press upfield vertically for a depth of 12 yards, then make a sharp break inside towards the middle of the field. Press outside vertically. At a depth of 6 yards, break inside across the formation gaining depth no greater than 8 yards. Get behind the linebackers! Press outside vertically. At a depth of 5 yards, break inside across the formation and flatten out. Fake handoff, continue on boot action. Read PS 1 to PS 2. You should be releasing the ball by the time you plant at the width of the tackle. If you haven’t thrown, continue running the football upfield.

 Boot

ZONE / STRETCH PASS

ZONE SERIES

X F

LT

LG

C QB

RG

RT

Y Z

A IACE GUN EMPTY -

Zone & Stretch pass will look and be executed exactly the same. This is simple a play-action pass off of these runs. The pass will be to the same side as the run. After faking the handoff, the quarterback will quickly set up for the pass behind the back and make the read for the throw. We want to victimize aggressive run support that tries to stop our base runs.

Receiver PS No.1 PS No.2 PS No.3 BS No.1 BS No.2 BS No.3 QB

Route ‘Fade’   ’Smash’  ’Get Open’
applicable) (if

Coaching Points
Release outside and vertical – look for the ball outside towards the sideline. Release outside, get vertical, then at a depth of 10 yards, make a sharp break outside towards the sideline gaining depth. Release vertically upfield, looking to occupy the middle of the field. Press upfield vertically for a depth of 12 yards, then make a sharp break inside towards the middle of the field Press inside vertically. At a depth of 6 yards, break inside across the formation gaining depth no greater than 8 yards. Get behind the linebackers! Press inside vertically. At a depth of 5 yards, break inside across the formation and flatten out. Fake handoff, and immediately set up for throw at a depth of 7 yards. Read PS 1 to PS 2. If no one open – run inside.

 ’Post’ ‘Drag’ (if applicable) ‘Drag’   Half Roll

34 / 35 ‘ZONE BOB’

ZONE SERIES

X

LT

LG

C QB F A

RG

RT

Y Z

FORMATIONS:

I– ACE – GUN –

This is the exact same play as "zone", with the exception is has been tagged "BOB" (back on backer) - the full back will attack the first playside linebacker.This play becomes a lead isolation play against the playside linebacker to the point of attack of our standard zone play. Instead of blocking away from the tight end, the fullback will take off to the area just outside of the playside guard and immediately climb to the 2nd level, looking to drive out the first linebacker over the guard.

Offensive Linemen PST Drive step to overtake playside "D" gap PSG Drive step to overtake playside "C" gap C Drive step to overtake playside "B" gap BSG Drive step OR CUT to overtake playsdie "A" gap BST Drive step OR CUT to overtake backside "A" gap - if no defender, cut backside linebacker Recievers and Backs Open at a steep 4/ 8 O'Clock and give to back. Continue a full speed bootleg to opposite "D" gap to Q hold DE / OLB. F Immediately open up to playside gap and fire through gap just outside of guard. Drive playside linebacker out of the seam. Take first step laterally reading the 1st playside down defender. If his helmet goes inside, push the vertical seam immediately. If his helmet goes outside, cut back just inside of him. Make one cut and GO! Reach gap to play call,. If no near threat, "chip" to near backer or safety Downfield block near defender. Downfield block near safety.

A

Y Z X

36 / 37 ‘STRETCH’

ZONE SERIES

X

LT

LG

C QB F A

RG

RT

Y Z

FORMATIONS:

I– ACE – GUN –

This is essentially our OUTSIDE ZONE play. Stretch is meant to press the area outside the tackle and either climb vertically through the crease outside of the tackle, or bounce outside toward the sideline. Different than zone, where we looked to get vertical movement on defenders, with stretch, we are looking to spread the defense out horizontally. We want to stretch the defense horizontally playside. Ideally, we do not want to cut these runs back.

PSG Drive step to overtake playside "C" gap C Drive step to overtake playside "B" gap BSG Drive step OR CUT to overtake playsdie "A" gap BST Drive step OR CUT to overtake backside "A" gap - if no defender, cut backside linebacker Recievers and Backs Open at a steep 5 O'Clock and give to back. Continue a full speed bootleg to opposite "D" gap to Q hold DE / OLB. F Open flat and look to block first outside defender in backside "C" gap - block any penetration first along route. Take first step laterally reading the 2nd playside down defender. If his helmet goes inside, push the vertical seam immediately. If his helmet goes outside, head for the sideline outside of him. Make one cut and GO! If the seam does not open, at the very least we want you stepping out of bounds at the LOS. Reach gap to play call - look to double the end defensive player with the tackle. If no near threat, "chip" to near backer or safety Downfield block near defender. Downfield block near safety.

A

Y Z X

36 / 37 ‘STRETCH BOSS ’

ZONE SERIES

X

LT

LG

C QB F A

RG

RT

Y Z

FORMATIONS:

I– ACE – GUN –

This play is exactly like "stretch" with the exception of tagging it with "BOSS" (back on Strong Safety / OLB) - the full back will attack the first 2nd level defender outside of the Y.

Offensive Linemen PST Drive step to overtake playside "D" gap PSG Drive step to overtake playside "C" gap C Drive step to overtake playside "B" gap BSG Drive step OR CUT to overtake playsdie "A" gap BST Drive step OR CUT to overtake backside "A" gap - if no defender, cut backside linebacker Recievers and Backs Open at a steep 5 O'Clock and give to back. Continue a full speed bootleg to opposite "D" gap to Q hold DE / OLB. F Open flat and look to block first outside defender in backside "C" gap - block any penetration first along route. Take first step laterally reading the 2nd playside down defender. If his helmet goes inside, push the vertical seam immediately. If his helmet goes outside, head for the sideline outside of him. Make one cut and GO! If the seam does not open, at the very least we want you stepping out of bounds at the LOS. Reach gap to play call,. If no near threat, "chip" to near backer or safety Downfield block near defender. Downfield block near safety.

A

Y Z X

14 / 15 ‘FOLLOW’

VEER SERIES

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LT

LG

C QB F A

RG

RT

Y Z

FORMATIONS:

I– ACE – GUN –

"Follow" is run exactly like regular veer, except the fullback through the playside hole will serve as an isolation blocker for the quarterback, who fakes the handoff, and follows the fullback through the hole.

Offensive Linemen PST Down block to first defender (inside linebacker) PSG Down block / double team first down lineman to your side of the ball C Post / double team first playside down linememan BSG Down block / hinge block away from playside BST Down block / hinge block away from playside Recievers and Backs Take one step to playside and handoff ball to fullback. Continue down the line staying parallel to the Q line of scrimmage (attacking edge lineman). F A Y Z X Step playside and immediately receive handoff. Aiming point is for the inside foot of the playside tackle. Make no cuts / redirection until you are past the linebackers. Step playside and continue laterally in an option-pitch relationship with the quarterback. Release vertical upfield to block backside pursuit player. Press vertically 6 yards then release inside to block backside force player. Press vertically 6 yards then release inside to block force player.

48 / 49 ‘JET (H/Z/F/X/A) __ REVERSE’

JET SERIES

Y Z

LT

LG

C QB

RG

RT F

X

A FORMATIONS: I ACE GUN EMPTY -

This is the counter off of our jet sweeps, which stretch a defense horizontally. Once we have conditioned defenses into over pursuing to stop the jet sweep, we can reverse the action with any of the original playside receivers. We will simply tag the player's position we wish to reverse the field with. We will call the jet play, run jet motion, block for the original jet play - the only thing different will be the reversing ball carrier and the back in the backfield and quarterback, who will be following action away from the jet motion and be lead blockers for the reversing ball carrier. Offensive Linemen PST Reach playside C gap PSG Reach playside B gap C Reach playside A gap BSG Release upfield immediately to cut off backer BST Release upfield immediately to cut off backside backer Recievers and Backs Snap ball once ball carrier reaches backside tackle and open up to them and handoff with inside Q hand. Continue running full speed on bootleg action away from play gaining width and depth. F A Y Z X You will block force playside. Once the ball is hiked, shoot immediately to playside "D" gap looking to seal / cut off first defender on the perimeter. Open up away from the call and wall off the backside "C" gap defender. Release upfield to cut off deep safety If ball carrier - you are in motion, looking to reach 3/4 speed by the time you reach near tackle. Receive the handoff and achieve full speed at playside tackle and head at a 45 degree angle for the field numbers - look to cut upfield once the playside sa Push vertically from the snap and look to crack on playside safety.

48 / 49 ‘JET (F/A) __SHOVEL’

JET SERIES

Y Z

LT

LG

C QB

RG

RT F

X

A FORMATIONS: I ACE GUN EMPTY -

This is our true counter play off of Jet sweep action. We are attacking the backside defensive end, who we are optioning on. We will fake Jet sweep, then the quarterback will continue on a wide and deep path to stretch the defensive end to contain them. The remaining back will take off on a path to where the defensive end was originally lined up. If the defensive end attacks the quarterback, the quarterback pitches inside to the back. If the defensive end attacks the back, the quarterback continues to run outside for a gain.
Offensive Linemen PST Reach playside C gap PSG Reach playside B gap C Reach playside A gap BSG Release upfield immediately to cut off backer BST Release upfield immediately to cut off backside backer Recievers and Backs Snap ball once ball carrier reaches backside tackle and open up to them and handoff with inside Q hand. Continue running full speed on bootleg action away from play gaining width and depth. F A Y You will block force playside. Once the ball is hiked, shoot immediately to playside "D" gap looking to seal / cut off first defender on the perimeter. Open up away from the call and wall off the backside "C" gap defender. Release upfield to cut off deep safety If ball carrier - you are in motion, looking to reach 3/4 speed by the time you reach near tackle. Receive the handoff and achieve full speed at playside tackle and head at a 45 degree angle for the field numbers - look to cut upfield once the playside sa Push vertically from the snap and look to crack on playside safety.

Z X

Roll Out Protection

LT

LG

C QB

RG

RT

LT

LG

C QB

RG

RT

B

B

West (Left) protection

East (Right) protection

Our deep passing game will be premised on getting outside quickly to make quick decisions and stretch the defense. We will rely solely on sprint out passing to minimize our liabilities in protection before the ball is thrown. We will aggressively step play side (the side we are sprinting out to), with the backside tackle gaining depth and fanning the last defensive linemen outside. The remaining back will become the additional edge blocker to ensure the quarterback can get outside of the pocket. By relying on sprint out passing, the quarterback is afforded multiple options to minimize our risks in the passing game. The quarterback can legally now throw the ball away, run with it, or choose between two or three receivers to throw to. The Sprint Out passing game is premised on five concepts that can be adjusted to attack a multitude of defensive coverages. To facilitate learning and identifying each package, we will refer to each package after a major city along the Gulf Coast following Interstate 20.

Dallas – Mesh package Monroe – Triangle package Jackson – Smash package Birmingham – Cross package Atlanta – Over package

We will just call the formation, West / East, and the package to run…. Ex. “Ace – F Motion – East Dallas” “Ace – East Birmingham” “Kings – Z Motion – West Atlanta”

Roll Out Passing Game

10 - 12 yds 6 - 8 yds 5 yds 3 yds
LT 1 LG C QB RG RT 3 2 2 1

“Dallas”
“Dallas” is the basis of our deep game passing. It is built on the “Mesh” principle of a play side flood of receivers in close proximity. The Dallas package affords us multiple throwing options regardless of coverage used.

Receiver PS No.1 PS No.2 PS No.3 BS No.1 BS No.2 BS No.3 QB

Route ‘Whip’   ’Smash’ ‘Flat’   ’Post’ NA  NA  Boot

Coaching Points              

Roll Out Passing Game

9 – 10 yds

LT 1 2

LG

C QB

RG

RT 3 2 1

“Monroe”
“Monroe” builds off the ‘Dallas’ package premised on building a triangle read for the quarterback and straining defensive coverages.

Receiver PS No.1 PS No.2 PS No.3 BS No.1 BS No.2 BS No.3 QB

Route ‘Fade’  ‘Whip’  ‘Option’  ‘Post’   NA  NA Boot 

Coaching Points              

Roll Out Passing Game

9 – 10 yds

LT 1

LG

C QB

RG

RT 3 2 1

“Jackson”
“Jackson” alters the routes presented thus far with creating two inside and two outside receiving options at various levels of the defensive coverage.

Receiver PS No.1 PS No.2 PS No.3 BS No.1 BS No.2 BS No.3 QB

Route   ‘Smash’  ‘Get Open’  ‘Fade’  NA   NA Boot 

Coaching Points              

Roll Out Passing Game

9 – 10 yds

LT 1 2

LG

C QB

RG

RT

2

1

“Birmingham”
“Birmingham” is built to create a mesh / cross in the middle of the field. This concept affords itself to initiate a rub / pick of the middle defender(s), freeing up one or both receivers in a seam.

Receiver PS No.1 PS No.2 PS No.3 BS No.1 BS No.2 BS No.3 QB

Route ‘Drag / Cross’   ’Post’   ‘Fade’  ‘Cross’    Boot 

Coaching Points              

Roll Out Passing Game

LT 1

LG

C QB

RG

RT 3 2 1

“Atlanta”
“Atlanta” is designed to create a three-level crossing read to stress a defense. We want to reach the perimeter quickly and attack one side of the field at various levels.

Receiver PS No.1 PS No.2 PS No.3 BS No.1 BS No.2 BS No.3 QB

Route ‘Take Two’   ’Flare’  NA  (Deep) ‘Cross’ (Middle) ‘Cross’  ‘Drag’   Boot

Coaching Points Get              

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