PRESENTATION ON TRAINING DESIGN

INTRODUCTIONThe training design is a set of instructions we can follow to design training for any line position in case of any industry . The Training Design ModelA model is a recipe or pattern that when followed results in a desired The Training Design Model is made up of outcome. seven interrelated components within the Human Resource Model Step #1 : Need Assessment Step #2 : Training Plan Step #3 : Lesson Plan Step #4 : Trainer Training Step #5 : Training Implementation Step #6 : Evaluation Step #7 : Counselling & Coaching

SOCIAL LEARNING THEORY
To develop effective training programs, it is important to understand the learning theory. Among many learning theories, Social learning theory is the most important. This theory provides a broad understanding of the learning process. Various learning processes and corresponding training events can be categorized as-

CONTD….
Attention/ Expectancy pretraining statement of objectives and Retention Behavioral Reproduction play & Reinforcement ( positive and/or Learning Environment, communication, process. stimulation of prior related learning. Active and guided practice( role simulations). Assessment and feedback negative).

STEPS TO TRAINING DESIGN
The process for developing performance-based training includes the following 10 steps. The first four steps constitute the task analysis that is necessary to design and develop relevant, useful training materials. Steps 5–10 constitute the design and development process.

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TASK ANALYSIS
1. DEFINE THE TARGET POPULATION. 2. LIST THE TASKS TO BE PERFORMED. 3. LIST THE SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE NEEDED TO DO THE TASKS. 4. SELECT SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE TO BE TAUGHT.

5. DEVELOP TRAINING DESIGN.

DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT

6. DRAFT OUT THE EXPANDED OUTLINES. 7. USE REALISTIC EXAMPLES IN YOUR EXERCISE. 8. DRAFT THE COMPLETE MODULES. 9. FIELD TEST THE TRAINING MATERIAL. 10. REVISE AND FINALIZE.

DEFINING THE TARGET POPULATION
To define the target population, ask questions such as: • What are the job titles of the intended participants in the training? • How were they originally trained for their jobs? • What are their educational and professional backgrounds? • Are they still in school or already on the job? • How are they accustomed to learning? • What languages do they speak and read? • What types of health facilities do they work in, and how are these facilities equipped? • By whom are they supervised? • Is it possible for them to attend a training course away from their

LISTING THE TASKS TO BE PERFORMED BY THE TARGET POPULATION
To list the tasks to be performed by the target population, one must know what “good performance” is, in other words, what a good performer would do on the job. To find out, the training developers must have access to: • technical experts who can accurately describe the job, • good performers who can be observed doing the job, and/or • documents and manuals that accurately describe the job.

LISTING THE SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE NEEDED TO DO THE TASKS
For each task involved in a job, the training developers next list the skills and knowledge required to perform the task. Skills are generally actions such as measuring, mixing, recording, calculating, communicating, or making decisions. Required knowledge is the information needed to do a task correctly. Making a list of required skills and knowledge often necessitates more questioning of experts to explore what is involved in each task. The final list of skills and knowledge can be very lengthy, and it becomes obvious that choices must be made about which skills and knowledge are most important to teach.

SELECTING THE SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE TO BE TAUGHT (TRAINING OBJECTIVES)
Possible criteria for inclusion • Many members of the target population lack the skill or knowledge. • Training (including practice and feedback) is required to learn the skill or knowledge because it is new or difficult. • The task for which the skill or knowledge is needed is important to the patient’s outcome. • The skill or knowledge is needed frequently. • It is practical to teach the skill or knowledge in the given training setting.

DESIGNING AND DEVELOPING THE TRAINING COURSE
As part of the design process, the training developers organize the selected skills and knowledge to be taught into logical teaching units called modules. The design for each module includes its training objectives and a brief outline of the information, examples and exercises that will provide opportunities for practice using the skills and knowledge.

COMPARISON OF TRADITIONAL AND STRATEGIC KNOWLEDGE TRAINING

STEP 1. Declarative knowledge (what) is presented.

STEP 1. Declarative knowledge is presented.

STEP 2. Procedural knowledge (how) is presented.

STEP 2.

The context of the procedures is added by instructing workers about the importance of the skill and time for its use.

STEP 3. Workers practice using the charts and interpreting the results.

STEP 3.

Procedural knowledge (how) would be presented the same way as in traditional training.

STEP 4. Workers are given feedback.

STEP 4.

Workers practice using the charts and also practice when and why to use them.

STEP 5.

Workers are given feedback.

CASE STUDY
The Garden Terrace Inn (GTI) is a sixty room full service hotel. Its target market is upper middle class professionals who desire quiet, safe, and pleasant surroundings . . . and, excellent service. GTI is located in Chelsea, Arizona, in the midst of lovely gardens overlooking Oak Creek just 20 minutes from Chelsea International Airport. The Living Room welcomes guests with well-stocked library shelves, comfortable overstuffed chairs, and a large stone fireplace. Guests and visitors feel at-home in this country inn atmosphere. The Terrace Lounge is adjacent to the Living Room and provides beautiful garden views while offering a wide choice of refreshing libations.

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GTI is independently owned and has been in operation six years. In the past, new hires were trained by other employees and management; but, as business stabilized, ownership determined there was a need for a more effective, efficient, and consistent training program. We are going to approach the training design model as an imaginary consulting firm hired by GTI—designing imaginary training—for an imaginary inn.

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The Garden Terrace Inn Organizational ChartGeneral manager JIM Executive chef PAUL executive housekeeper OLIVIA assistant general manager KELLY

Sous chef

book-keepers Dish washers

cooks

front desk managers

dining managers servers

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1) Needs Assessment a. What is the problem? b. Who needs what? c. Objectives: What should the training outcomes be? d. Define the trainees • Who are we training? (common profile) • What are their learning styles? • What do they already know? 2) Training Plan a. Training topics b. Schedule time and place c. Select trainers

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3) Lesson Plans a. Behavioral objectives b. Select methods c. Content & materials d. Trainer directions (script & business) e. Trainee evaluation instruments 4) Train-the-Trainer a. Design formal training for trainers including: • Adult learning principles • Motivation & communication • Team building & leadership • Teaching methods

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5) Implementation a. Preparation & practice 6) Evaluating training program a. Did it meet the objectives? 7) Coaching and Counseling a. Supervision/On-going training b. Recognizing and addressing personal problems

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