You are on page 1of 19

Tour Guiding And

Sustainable Tourism

Areas to be covered
1. Definition of key terms
2. Components of sustainable tourism
3. Objectives of sustainable tourism
4. Role of Tour Guiding in Sustainable Tourism
5. Measures to enforce tour guides o contribute
sustainable tourism
6. Interpretation and sustainable tourism

Definition of key terms


Sustainability concept in terms of tourism means the
improvement of life quality of the host community,
satisfaction of visitors, the conservative use of natural
beauties, historical wealth, social and cultural values
which are the basic capital of tourism (Ahn, Lee & Shafer,
2002:1)
sustainable tourism is defined as Tourism that takes
full account of its current and future economic, social and
environmental impacts, addressing the needs of visitors,
the industry, and the environment and host communities

Sustainable tourism is ... Based on the enhancement of


natural, cultural and social resources with the dual aim of
improving the standard of living and quality of life of local
residents, while satisfying the expectations and the
needs of visitors, and preserving natural habitats and
cultural identities for future generations. Thibal (1997)

Sustainable tourism has three


key components
Sustainable tourism has three key components, sometimes
referred to as the triple bottom line
Environmentally, It minimizes damage to the environment
(flora, fauna, habitats, water, living marine resources, energy use,
contamination, etc.) And ideally tries to benefit the environment.
Economically, it contributes to the economic well-being of the
community, generating sustainable and equitable income for
local communities and as many other stakeholders as possible.
It benefits owners, employees and neighbors. It does not simply
begin and then rapidly die because of poor business practices.

Socially and culturally, it does not harm the social


structure or culture of the community where it is located.
Instead it respects local cultures and traditions.
It involves stakeholders (individuals, communities, tour
operators, government institutions) in all phases of
planning, development, and monitoring, and educates
stakeholders about their roles.

Sustainable tourism has three key components

Socially and culturally, it does not harm the social


structure or culture of the community where it is located.
Instead it respects local cultures and traditions. It
involves stakeholders (individuals, communities, tour
operators, government institutions) in all phases of
planning, development, and monitoring, and educates
stakeholders about their roles.

Objectives of sustainable
tourism
Economic viability: to ensure the viability and
competitiveness of tourism enterprises so that they are
able to continue to prosper and deliver benefits in the
long term.
Local prosperity: to maximize the contribution of
tourism to the prosperity of the host destination,
including the proportion of visitor spending that is
retained locally.
Employment quality: to strengthen the number and
quality of local jobs created and supported by tourism,
including the level of pay, conditions of service and

Social equity: to seek a widespread distribution of


economic and social benefits from tourism throughout
the recipient community, including improving
opportunities, income and services available to the poor.
Visitor fulfillment: to provide a safe, satisfying and
fulfilling experience for visitors, available to all without
discrimination by gender, race, and disability or in other
ways.
Local control: to engage and empower local
communities in planning and decision taking about the
management and future development of tourism in their
area, in consultation with other stakeholders.
Community wellbeing: to maintain and strengthen the
quality of life in local communities, including social

Cultural richness: to respect and enhance the historic heritage,


authentic culture, traditions and distinctiveness of host
communities.
Physical integrity: to maintain and enhance the quality of
landscapes, both urban and rural, and avoid the physical and
visual degradation of the environment.
Biological diversity: to support the conservation of natural
areas, habitats and wildlife, and minimize damage to them.
Resource efficiency: to minimize the use of scarce and nonrenewable resources in the development and operation of
tourism facilities and services.
Environmental purity: to minimize the pollution of air, water
and land and the generation of waste by tourism enterprises and
visitors.

Role of Tour Guiding in Sustainable


Tourism
Tour guides play a central role in the implementation of
sustainable tourism concept
As principle providers of educational element (about
natural and cultural environment) to tourists
Promoting local economic development
Spend much time with tourists, and influence tourist
experience of destination

Provide guidelines, rules and regulations of the site/ sites dos and
donts
Make tourists comply with whatever restrictions imposed by the
attraction sites
Inspire tourists to become supporters of conservation
Guides behavior and attitude send an important message to
tourists and local people
Since guides visit tourist sites frequently, can be in position to
notice and report negative impacts tourists make to the
site/community
Can also do monitoring implemented measures to conserve
resources by observing changes at the sites
Can link sites administration and local people about conservation
issues and other issues pertaining impacts of tourism

Measures to enforce tour guides o contribute sustainable tourism

To ensure that tour guides contribute positively


towards sustainable tourism: the following
measures should be taken
Sites/authorities must have effective control over the
use of guides and conditions under which guides will
operate within the site
Licensing tour guides who complies with relevant rules
and regulations is a very effective mechanism
Setting up a criteria for guides to attend training
courses

Using local people as tour guides


Encourage the creation of tour guides associations that
will help to organize guides

Interpretation and sustainable


tourism
Interpretation is an educational activity which aims to
bring meaning and relationships through use of original
objects, by firsthand experience with the resource or by
illustrative media, rather than simply to communicate
factual information.
Sustainable tourism means tourism which is
economically viable but does not destroy the resources
on which the future of tourism will depend, notably the
physical environment and the social fabric of the host
community (Swarbrooke, 1999:13).

1. Enhancing visitor experiences and satisfaction


2. Managing visitors and their impacts
3. Promoting cultural understanding, and social inclusion
4. Raising visitors Knowledge and awareness of wildlife and habitats
5. Improving the Business
6. Creating employment opportunities for local people
7. Increase reputation of the agencies hence repeated visitor

Enhancing visitor experiences and satisfaction


People who enjoy an interpretive program are usually more likely to
learn from it and to change their attitudes and behaviors. Thus
satisfaction can be an important precursor to other outcomes of
interpretation. But interpretation can also be a major component of the
actual wildlife experience and make significant contributions to
satisfaction
Managing visitors and their impacts
Visitors and their impacts can be managed though interpretation by
influencing where visitors go, providing a substitute experience,
informing about appropriate behavior, and developing visitor' concern.

Promoting cultural understanding, and social inclusion


Interpretation can also promote cultural understanding, and social
inclusion. The use of indigenous and local knowledge in interpretation
programs can include local people in tourism ventures, enhance
visitors' experience, increase cultural awareness, and promote respect
towards indigenous peoples.
Enable communities to better understand their heritage, and to
express their own ideas and feelings about their home area. As a result
individuals may identify with lost values inherent in their culture.
Raising visitors Knowledge and awareness of wildlife and
habitats
The educational element of interpretation can also raise visitors
knowledge and awareness of wildlife and habitats and thus can
encourage pro-conservation attitudes and motivation to act on broader
conservation issues.

Improving the Business


High quality interpretation can also improve business by
increasing the quality of guests experience, increasing repeat
visitation and occupancy rates, providing unique marketing
opportunities and allowing hotels to charge higher rates.
Creating employment opportunities for local people
The effective interpretation involves indigenous people as guides
and interpreters adds an authentic element to a wildlife tourism
experience that is valued by many tourists and adds depth to
visitors understanding of wildlife.
People with local knowledge, and with a passion for the place in
which they have grown up and come to love, have the two
essential ingredients that make the best interpretive guides:
they are knowledgeable and they are passionate.