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URBAN

DESIGN
SAHIL GOEL
SAHIL VERMA
SHIVA BAGGA
VISHAL SHARMA

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WHAT IS URBAN DESIGN..???


Urban design is the process of shaping the
physical setting for life in cities, towns and villages.
It is the art of making places. It involves the design
of buildings, groups of buildings, spaces and
landscapes, and establishing the processes that
make successful development possible.

GOALS OF URBAN DESIGN


1. To create an attractive, lively, and gracious city for
people.
2. To promote an image of quality and distinction in the
harmonious
blending of the natural and built environments.
3. To create and develop public and semi-public spaces
to attract people.
4. To give visual prominence to pedestrian facilities and
environments.
5. To develop a functional and aesthetically pleasing
urban Downtown.
6. To strengthen residential neighborhood identity by
defining edges
and designating landmarks.
7. To provide compatible transitions between areas of
different land

Urban design can significantly influence


the economic, environmental, social
and cultural outcomes of a place:
Urban design can influence the economic
success and socio-economic composition of a
localitywhether
it
encourages
local
businesses and entrepreneurship; whether it
attracts people to live there; whether the
costs of housing and travel are affordable;
and whether access to job opportunities,
Urban
design
can influence
health and the
facilities
and services
are equitable.
social and cultural impacts of a locality: how
people interact with each other, how they
move around, and how they use a place.

ELEMENTS OF
URBAN DESIGN

BUILDINGS
Buildings are the most pronounced elements of urban
design - they shape and articulate space by forming the
streetwalls of the city. Well designed buildings and groups
of buildings work together to create a sense of place.

PUBLIC SPACE
Great public spaces are the living room of
the city - the place where people come
together to enjoy the city and each other.
Public spaces make high quality life in the
city possible - they form the stage and
backdrop to the drama of life. Public
spaces range from grand central plazas and
squares, to small, local neighborhood parks.

STREETS
Streets are the connections between spaces
and places, as well as being spaces
themselves. They are defined by their
physical dimension and character as well as
the size, scale, and character of the
buildings that line them. Streets range
from grand avenues such as the ChampsElysees
in
Paris
to
small,
intimate
pedestrian streets. The pattern of the
street network is part of what defines a city
and what makes each city unique.

TRANSPORT
Transport systems connect the parts of cities
and help shape them, and enable movement
throughout the city. They include road, rail,
bicycle,
and
pedestrian
networks,
and
together form the total movement system of
a city. The balance of these various transport
systems is what helps define the quality and
character of cities, and makes them either
friendly or hostile to pedestrians. The best
cities are the ones that elevate the
experience of the pedestrian while minimizing
the dominance of the private automobile.

LANDSCAPE
The landscape is the green part of the city
that weaves throughout - in the form of
urban parks, street trees, plants, flowers,
and water in many forms. The landscape
helps define the character and beauty of a
city and creates soft, contrasting spaces
and elements. Green spaces in cities range
from grand parks such as Central Park in
New York City and the Washington DC Mall,
to small intimate pocket parks.

Sidewalks, Walkways, and Trails


Sidewalk design may include separation from
streets, connections to walkway and trail
systems, landscaping, and other pedestrian
amenities that enhance the community and
improve pedestrian comfort.
Include clear and ample walkways from
street sidewalks and
parking areas to building entrances and
within and between developments as a part
of
site design

ELEMENTS OF URBAN DESIGN


KEVIN LYNCH

PATHS :
Paths are the channels along which the observer customarily, occasionally, or
potentially moves.
They may be

Streets
Walkways
Transit lines
Canals
Streets
Railroads
Trails and
other Channels in which people travel.

Walkways

Lynch noted that paths were often the predominant elements in peoples image
with the other elements being arranged and related along paths .

Rail Roads

Canals

Trails

EDGES :

Edges are the linear elements not used or considered as paths by the observer.
Perceived boundaries such as
Walls
Buildings and
Shorelines
Rail Road Cuts
Walls
Buildings
Edges of Development
May be barriers, more or less penetrable, which close one region off from
another, or they may be seams, lines along which two regions are related and
joined together.

They are lateral references rather than coordinate axes.

These edge elements, although probably not as dominant as paths, are for
many people important organizing features, particularly in the role of holding
together generalized areas, as in the outline of a city by water or wall.

Shore Lines

Railroad Cuts

Development Edges

DISTRICTS :

Districts are the medium-to-Iarge sections of the city, conceived of as having


two-dimensional extent, which the observer mentally enters "inside of," and
which are recognizable as having some common, identifying character.
Always identifiable from the inside, they are also used for exterior reference
if visible from the outside.
It seems to depend not only upon the individual but also upon the given city.
Relatively large sections of the city distinguished by some identity or
character
These are the medium to large areas
Distinctive physical characteristics might include thematic continuities,
such as

Texture
Space
Form
Detail
Symbol and
Building.

NODES :

Nodes are points, the strategic spots in a city into which an observer can
enter, and which are the intensive foci to and from which he is traveling.
Focal points
Intersections or loci
The strategic spots in a city into which an observer can enter, and which
are the intensive foci and from which the person is travelling.
They may be

primarily junctions
places of a break in transportation
a crossing or convergence of paths
moments of shift from one structure to another.

The nodes may be simply concentrations, which gain their importance from
being the condensation of some use or physical
character, as a street-corner hangout or an enclosed square.

LANDMARKS :
Landmarks key physical characteristics was singularity some
aspect that is unique or memorable in the context.
readily identifiable objects which serve as external reference
points.
Some landmarks
Towers
spires
hills

Sculptures
signs

Signage

Sculpture

are distant and are typically seen from many angles and from
distance, over the top of smaller elements.

Spires

Signage

Towers

Spires