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CONTROL OF CORROSION IN STEEL

Ahmed Minhajuddin

Nothing destroys iron, but its own


corrosion!!!

1.

INTRODUCTION

2.

MECHANISM OF CORROSION

3.

CORROSION CONTROL

4.

RESEARCH PROPOSAL

5.

CONCLUSION

What is Corrosion?
Corrosion is defined as the destruction or deterioration of a material because of
its reaction with environment.

Mechanism of Corrosion
Anodic and Cathodic Reactions

At Anode surface: Fe
2e- + Fe2+
(metallic iron)
At Cathode surface: () O2 + H2O + 2eair
At Anode : Fe++ + 2(OH)-

water
FeO (H2O)x
rust

2(OH)-

Mechanism of Corrosion

How Do We Control Corrosion?


There are four common methods used to control corrosion.
Coatings and linings are principal tools for defending against corrosion. These substances
are often applied in conjunction with cathodic protection systems to provide the most costeffective protection for a structure.
Cathodic Protection (CP) is a technology that uses direct electrical current to counteract
the normal external corrosion of a structure that contains metal, such as an underground
petroleum storage tank or natural gas pipeline. On new structures, CP can help prevent
corrosion from starting; on existing structures; CP can help stop existing corrosion from
getting worse.
Materials selection refers to the selection and use of corrosion-resistant materials such as
stainless steels, plastics, and special alloys to enhance the life span of a structure. Some of
the most common materials used in constructing a variety of facilities, such as steel and
steel-reinforced concrete, can be severely affected by corrosion.
Corrosion inhibitors are substances that, when added to a particular environment,
decrease the rate of attack of that environment on a material such as metal. They can help
extend the life of equipment, prevent system shutdowns and failures, avoid product
contamination, prevent loss of heat transfer, and preserve an attractive appearance of
structures.

How Do We Control Corrosion?

REBAR COATING
SCARIFIED & PATCHED DECK
AWAITS ANODE MESH
FLY ASH
HOT-DIP GALVANIZING
WIRELESS SENSOR FOR
MONITORING CHLORIDE IN
CONCRETE
INHIBITORS

What is the science behind these materials.


Coatings will develop micro flaws over time, which allow water, oxygen and
bacteria to penetrate, providing a perfect environment for rust. Corrosion can start
with microscopic flaws that are invisible to the human eye. Once started,
corrosion can continue to spread underneath the coating, unobserved by casual
visual inspection. By the time the problem becomes visible, considerable damage
can be done.

Passive film develops on the bar surface

The Rise of Smart, Self-Healing Coatings


Todays most sophisticated corrosion-protective coatings go beyond moisture barriers
and sacrificial elements. Advances in microencapsulation have enabled development of
smart coatings that can heal themselves if damaged.

Smart coatings contain microcapsules or capsules that break open when exposed to a
particular trigger. Microencapsulation allows an active ingredient, such as a healing
agent, to stay enclosed and protected from the environment until it is needed

CONCLUSION
Self-healing coatings are a robust method of corrosion protection that can
automatically repair damage and prolong the useful life of the coating.
In addition to releasing self-healing chemicals, the smart capsules detect and
reveal corrosion forming on metal before it is visible to the naked eye.
The coating of the microcapsule is functionalized, meaning it detects and reacts
to microscopic signs of developing corrosion. This means that the coating does not
have to be physically damaged to trigger the release of the healing agent; the
presence of corrosion is itself the trigger.
It is a single-component system, which does not require the addition of a
separate catalyst to cure the healing agent. The healing agent is instead cured by
the corrosion byproducts

Thank you.