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Special Problems in

Education
Management
Challenges in the 21st
Century
Reporters: John Angelo P. Sumugat
Marc Arceo

Management Challenges in the


21st Century
This

report will provide


insightful and timely
information for
individuals and
organizations alike as we
look toward common
goals in the next one
hundred years.

Management is the most


significant aspect of any
business. However, in a
persistently transforming
business environment,
managers cannot model
themselves on management
standards from the past and
anticipate facing the
problems of the current
workplace. Giving at orders

The

21st century did


not change the
factors that make
good managers, but
only transformed the
way management
should be done.

The capabilities to
execute and role model
will always be
necessary. The dawn of
the 21st century
ushered in a new
management style with
skills uniquely modified
to guarantee success in

According

to Dalby &
Jaska (2004), what
many scholars refer to
as modern
management, in its oldstyle form of practice
and theory, has reached
the boundaries of its
possibilities.

The

currently emerging
and imminent world of
management and
business brings new
problems that
necessitate an entire
different approach of
management.

Management Problems in the


21st Century
The first management

problem in this century


is the reconsideration of
the philosophical basis
of management towards
a high and politer
purpose (Enkvist, Nauclr
& Oppenheim 2008).

Ensuring

that the
management work
serves the highest
purpose seems to be a
challenge to managers
of the 21st century.

Krebs

(2007) precisely
points out that the
outdated goal of
exploiting shareholder
wealth is limited in
various aspects since it
lacks the capability of
mobilizing human
energies.

Therefore,

future
management practices
need to concentrate on
the attainment of socially
significant and noble
objective. Nevertheless,
it is never sufficient to
have both noble and
inspiring motives.

Henceforth,

the
organization should be both
innovative and adaptable.
This requires the
broadening the mental
limits of management with
visions from diversified
fields such as political
science, urban planning and
theology.

The

present management
requires a radical
transformation in both the
practice and language of
management from ordinary
and uninspiring
terminologies such as
advantage to deep soul
inspiring ideals such as truth,
love, justice and beauty.

The inspiring ideals


have for a long time
driven human beings to
remarkable
achievements and
cannot be downgraded
to the management
fringe.

Likewise,

problemsolving, decision-making
and innovation systems
of the business should be
capable of harnessing the
collective wisdom of the
whole business (Enkvist,
Nauclr & Oppenheim
2008).

The second problem


is the REDESIGNING of
organization into a
more open, inclusive
and democratic
community (Enkvist,
Nauclr & Oppenheim
2008).

In

order for an
organization to be
successful in the
current changing
environment, there
must be great
diffusion and sharing
of knowledge, power
and information
among the employees

This

implies that the


manager will have to
empower the people
serving at lower levels of
the organization,
particularly the front-line
staff that have a direct
contact with the clients
(i.e. the Stakeholders and
learners).

The

management should
abandon traditional topdown strategy making
process and shift to the
bottom-up process that
enables the entire staff
to participate in making
the strategy.

Public managers
face the CRISIS
OF COMPETENCE
in the national
workforce (Dalby
& Jaska 2004).

Another problem
faced by not only
public managers, but
also private sector
managers is
information overload
(Dalby & Jaska 2004).

Information
overload is evident
in everyday life.
e.g., emails,
instant messages
and cellphones are
some of the causes
of information

Hundreds

of
surveillance cameras,
information on
climate and weather,
real-time news are
also some of the
contributing factors
to information

Information

overload presents
the threat of
missing a significant
information
essential in making
informed decisions.

Nevertheless,

Enkvist,
Nauclr & Oppenheim
(2008) argue that
innovations data
standards, data
capture and storage
have resulted in
opportunities for

These

innovations
have the capability
of extracting the
knowledge
required to
develop strategybased resolutions.

In addition, they can also be


helpful in creating prognostic
forecast and frameworks,
which enhance organizational
responsiveness to
forthcoming events, either
routine or non-routine events
such as crime waves, natural
disasters.

Hence in totality,
the challenge to
managers will be
developing
organization-wide
and mission-specific
information and
analytic functions.

Fourth: government
without boundary is a
challenge to managers
in the 21st century
(Enkvist, Nauclr &
Oppenheim 2008).

The

government is
presently organized on
assumptions that the
universe is comparatively
predictable and stable
and that the work of the
government can be fixed
in extensive, repeatable
routines.

This

creates a
hierarchical and
bureaucratic system
that might have been
implemented in the
mid-20th century from
the managerial world.

Increasingly, this does


not indicate the realities
of today. The world of
management has been
struggling with how
effective to organize the
delivery of services that
are unpredictable and
customized.

The

struggles are also


visible in the public
sector. The problem is
being capable of
combining knowledge
and skills compliantly
around the
transforming tasks.

Market-based
mechanisms and
hierarchy tend to be
struggling with these
problems. As such, the
government is shifting
to non-hierarchical ways
of conducting business,
frequently called
boundary-less

As

a result, these new


frameworks raise
questions concerning
how to control
efficiently in the
network-based
environment (Dalby &
Jaska 2004).

For instance, public


managers find it difficult
to craft agendas and
plans, allocate resources
and set priorities across
boundaries considered
being legitimate, trusted
and credible.

Fifth: Technological
revolution is one of
the most common
management problem
in the 21st century
(Enkvist, Nauclr &
Oppenheim 2008).

Managers

began
encountering 21st-century
issues when they noticed
other professionals had
computers and telephones
at their workplaces and
that technology can
connect people through
networks.

The lives of managers, as


well as professionals,
differ considerably from
their lives prior to the
transformation of
communities by the
ubiquity of cell phones,
personal computers and
network connectivity.

As

a result, managers
have problems dealing
with the transformed
community at the
workplace as well as
their adaptation to
technological
environment.

According

to Gitsham,
Pegg & Culpin (2011),
PEOPLE issues are
another problem
managers face in the
business world of the
21st century.

According

to many
managers, people
issues encompass
relationships with
other employees of
the organization.

Traditionally,

the
management housed
such issues under the
human resource section
away from the central
business. Traditional
management
emphasized on dealing
with people issues

With

the dawn of
the 21st century,
people issues are
progressively
gaining the center
stage of many
businesses.

6 problem: Security
and privacy in a
highly dynamic
business is another
problem for
managers. Issues
related to privacy and
security should be
overtly factored into
TH

The invention of the


internet together with
cheap data storage,
wireless abilities and
host of other
technologies seem have
influenced economic
growth and innovation.

However,

the use of
these technologies
potentially comes
with various risks.
Because
organizations
substantially depend
on these

In

addition, since
they appear to be
similar
everywhere,
susceptibility in
one area tends to
imply
susceptibility in all

Because

these
technologies reach
everybody, managers
need to differentiate
whom to accept or reject.
As the organization uses
these technologies, either
the internet or cellphone,
there are digital crumbs

As

a result, the
responsibility of the
management increases
because they need to
assess technological risks
associated with using
these latest inventions.
The managers will have to
set resources aside and
plan for these risks.

7th: Global warming is a


common problem to the
whole world and
managers are not an
exceptional. The problem
of global warming is what
Krebs (2007) refers to as
Green Leadership.

Over

the past few


years, global
warming resulting
from the burning of
fossil fuels has
shifted from high
likelihood to a near
probability.

Almost everywhere in
the universe the
workplace included, the
environment experiences
extraordinary stress
from increasing energy
use and economic
growth.

How

managers and the


rest of the world deals with
the issue of environmental
challenge will substantially
determine the quality of
life. Markets and
technology can play a
significant role, though the
managers role will be just
as crucial.

Employees have
continuously showed
innovative approaches
around the boundaries
of growth if the
motivations are right.

However,

this not yet


the case for
environment and
energy. Organizations
themselves undervalue
the environment and
fail to promote
conservation by not
establishing

Environmental effects
such as greenhouse
gasses necessitate a
universal approach.
This is because little
is achievable if one
country reduces the
emission while the
other increases or

Through corporate
social
responsibility,
organizations have
set resources aside
to alleviate global
warming (Gitsham,
Pegg & Culpin

Conclusion
The 21st century has changed
the management of business
organization and brought
with it management
problems. Some of the
problems discussed by this
report include people issues,
security and privacy, and
technological revolution.

Traditional form of
management entirely place
emphasis on organizational
structure, whereas total
quality management
places emphasis on
product, service or
quality. Quality
management is the most

References List

Dalby, B & Jaska, P 2004, Critical management issues in


small businesses ,Allied Academies International
Conference, vol 10, no. 1, pp. 11-16.

Enkvist, P, Nauclr, T & Oppenheim, J 2008, Business


strategies for climate change,The McKinsey Quarterly,
vol 3, no. 1, pp. 30-41.

Gitsham, M, Pegg, M & Culpin, V 2011, The shifting


landscape of global challenges in the 21st century:
what this means for what businesses want from
tomorrows leaders, and the implications for
management learning ,Business Leadership Review,
vol 8, no. 2, pp. 1-15.

Ireland, D & Hitt, A 1999, Achieving & maintaining


strategic competitiveness in the 21stcentury: The role of
strategic leadership,Academy of Management
Executive, vol 13, no. 1, pp. 12-19.

Krebs, V 2007, The worker managing the 21st of the


future century organization,IHRIM Journal, vol 11,
no. 4, pp. 1-7.