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Lecture 15: Governors

ECE 576 Power System


Dynamics and Stability

Prof. Tom Overbye


Dept. of Electrical and Computer
Engineering
University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign
overbye@illinois.edu
2

Announcements
Midterm exam is on March 13 in class
Closed book, closed notes
You may bring one 8.5 by 11" note sheet
You do not have to write down model block
diagram or the synchronous machine
differential equations I'll supply those if
needed

Simple calculators allowed

Covers up to and including exciters,


but not governors
After test read Chapter 7
3

Best HW4 Result

Speed and Voltage Control

P,

Q,V
5

Prime Movers and


Governors

Synchronous generator is used to


convert mechanical energy from a
rotating shaft into electrical energy
The "prime mover" is what converts the
orginal energy source into the
mechanical energy in the rotating shaft
Possible sources: 1) steam (nuclear,
coal, combined cycle, solar thermal), 2)
gas turbines, 3) water wheel (hydro
turbines), 4) diesel/
gasoline, 5) wind
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Prime Movers and


Governors

In transient stability collectively the


prime mover and the governor are
called the "governor"
As has been previously discussed,
models need to be appropriate for the
application
In transient stability the response of the
system for seconds to perhaps minutes
is considered
Long-term dynamics, such as those of
the boiler and automatic generation
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Power Grid Disturbance


Example
Figures show the frequency change as a result of the sudden
loss of a large amount of generation in the Southern WECC
60
59.99
59.98
59.97
59.96
59.95
59.94
59.93
59.92
59.91
59.9
59.89
59.88
59.87
59.86
59.85
59.84
59.83
59.82
59.81
59.8
59.79
59.78
59.77
59.76
59.75
59.74
59.73

q. Hz)

10

11

12

13

Time in Seconds

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

Frequency
Contour
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Frequency Response for


Generation Loss
In response to a rapid loss of
generation, in the initial seconds the
system frequency will decrease as
energy stored in the rotating masses
is transformed into electric energy
Solar PV has no inertia, and for most
new wind turbines the inertia is not seen
by the system

Within seconds governors respond,


increasing the power output of
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Governor Response:
Thermal Versus Hydro
Thermal units respond quickly, hydro ramps slowly (and goes down
initially), wind and solar usually do not respond. And many units are set
to not respond!

Normalized
output

Time in Seconds

10

Some Good References


Kundur, Power System Stability and
Control, 1994
Wood, Wollenberg and Sheble, Power
Generation, Operation and Control (2nd
edition, 1996, 3rd in 2013)
IEEE PES, "Dynamic Models for TurbineGovernors in Power System Studies,"
Jan 2013
"Dynamic Models for Fossil Fueled
Steam Units in Power System Studies,"
IEEE Trans. Power Syst., May 1991, pp.
11

Control of Generation
Overview

Goal is to maintain constant frequency


with changing load
If there is just a single generator, such
with an emergency generator or
isolated system, then an isochronous
governor is used
Integrates frequency error to insure
frequency goes back to
the desired value
Cannot be used with
Image source:
Wood/Wollenberg,systems
2 edition
interconnected
12
nd

Generator Hunting
Control system hunting is
oscillation around an equilibrium
point
Trying to interconnect multiple
isochronous generators will cause
hunting because the frequency
setpoints of the two generators are
never exactly equal
One will be accumulating a frequency
error trying to speed up the system,
13

Isochronous Gen Example


WSCC 9 bus from before, gen 3
dropping (85 MW)
No infinite bus, gen 1 is modeled with an
isochronous generator (new PW v18
ISOGov1 model)

Bus 2

Bus 7

Bus 8

Bus 9

Bus 3

60

1.025 pu

1.026 pu

1.032 pu

1.025 pu

59.95

85 MW
-11 Mvar

59.9

Bus 5

0.996 pu

100 MW

Bus 6

59.85

1.013 pu

35 Mvar

59.8

125 MW
50 Mvar
Bus 4

1.026 pu

90 MW
30 Mvar

Bus1

1.040 pu

slack

72 MW
27 Mvar

Speed (Hz)

163 MW
7 Mvar

1.016 pu

59.75
59.7
59.65
59.6
59.55
59.5
59.45

Gen 2 is modeled with no


governor, so its mechanical power
stays fixed

59.4
0

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

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Time (Seconds)
f
g

Speed_Gen Bus 2 #1 f

Speed_Gen Bus 3 #1 f

14

Speed_Gen Bus1 #1

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20

Isochronous Gen Example


Graph shows the change in the
mechanical output
180
170

All the change


in MWs due
to the loss of
gen 3 is
being picked
up by
gen 1

160

Mechanical Power (MW)

150
140
130
120
110
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
0

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

Time (Seconds)
f
g

Mech Input_Gen Bus 2 #1 f

Mech Input_Gen Bus1 #1

Mech Input_Gen Bus 3 #1

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Droop Control
To allow power sharing between
generators the solution is to use what
is known as droop control, in which the
Risis known as the
desired set point frequency
1
regulation constant
pm pref f
dependent upon the Rgenerators
or droop; a typical
output
value is 4 or 5%.
At 60 Hz and a 5%
droop, each 0.1 Hz
change would
change the output
by 0.1/(60*0.05)=
3.33%
16

WSCC 9 Bus Droop Example


Assume the previous gen 3 drop
contingency (85 MW), and that gens 1
and 2 have ratings of 500 and 250
MVA
respectively
and
governors
with
a
To solve the problem in per unit, all values need to be on a
5%
droop. What is the final frequency
common base (say 100 MVA)
(assuming
nochange
in load)?
pm1 pm 2 85 /100
0.85
100
100
0.01, R2,100 MVA R2
0.02
500
250

1
1
pm1 pm 2

f 0.85

1,100 MVA R2,100 MVA


f .85 /150 0.00567 0.34 Hz 59.66 Hz
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R1,100 MVA R1

WSCC 9 Bus Droop Example

190
180
170
160

The below graphs compare the


mechanical power and generator
speed; note the steady-state values
match the calculated 59.66 Hz value
60

59.95
59.9

59.85
59.8

140

59.75

130
120

59.7

Speed (Hz)

Mechanical Power (MW)

150

110
100
90
80
70
60

59.65
59.6
59.55
59.5
59.45
59.4

50

59.35

40

59.3

30
20

59.25

10

59.2

59.15

10

11

12

13

14

15

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Time (Seconds)
gf

Mech Input_Gen Bus 2 #1 f

Mech Input_Gen Bus1 #1

17

18

19

20
0

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

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Time (Seconds)

Mech Input_Gen Bus 3 #1


f
g

Speed_Gen Bus 2 #1 f

Case is wscc_9bus_TGOV1

Speed_Gen Bus 3 #1 f

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Speed_Gen Bus1 #1

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Quick Interconnect
Calculation

When studying a system with many


generators, each with the same (or
online
generators
close) droop, then the The
final
frequency
obviously does not
R Pgen , MW
f is
include the contingency
deviation

Si , MVA

generator(s)

OnlineGens

The online generator summation


should only include generators that
actually have governors that can
19

Larger System Example


As an example, consider the 37 bus,
nine generator example from earlier;
assume one generator with 42 MW is
0.05 42The total MVA of the
opened.
f
0.00186 pu 0.111 Hz 59.889 Hz
1132
remaining
generators is 1132. With
R=0.05
60

200
190
180
170
160
150
140
130
120
110
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

59.99
59.98
59.97
59.96
59.95
59.94
59.93
59.92
59.91

59.9
59.89
59.88
59.87
59.86
59.85
59.84
59.83
59.82
59.81
59.8

59.79
59.78
59.77
0

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

10

f
g

Mech Input, Gen JO345 #1

Mech Input, Gen SLACK345 #1 f

Mech Input, Gen LAUF69 #1

Mech Input, Gen ROGER69 #1 f

Mech Input, Gen BLT138 #1

Mech Input, Gen BLT69 #1

Case is Bus37_TGOV1

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12

13

14

15

16

17

Mech Input, Gen JO345 #2

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18

19

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Impact of Inertia (H)


Final frequency is determined by the
droop of the responding governors
How quickly the frequency drops
depends upon the generatorThe
inertia
least
values
frequency
deviation
occurs with
high inertia
and fast
governors
21

Restoring Frequency to 60 (or


50) Hz
In an interconnected power system
the governors to not automatically
restore the frequency to 60 Hz
Rather this is done via the ACE (area
control area calculation). Previously
we defined ACE as the difference
between the actual real power
exports from an area and the
scheduled exports. But it has an
additional term
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2600 MW Loss Frequency


Recovery

Frequency recovers in about ten minutes


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Turbine Models

model shaft squishiness as a spring


d
s
TM K shaft HP TOUT
dt
2 H d
TM TELEC TFW
Usually shaft dynamics
s dt
are neglected
d HP
HP s
dt
2 H HP d HP
TIN TOUT
s
dt

High-pressure
turbine shaft
dynamics
24

Steam Turbine Models


Boiler supplies a "steam chest" with the steam then
entering the turbine through a value

dPCH
PCH PSV
dt
Assume Tin = PCH and a rigid shaft with PCH = T M

TCH

Then the above equation becomes


dTM
TM PSV
dt
And we just have the swing equations from before

TCH

d
s
dt
2H d
TM TELEC TFW
s dt

We are
assuming
=HP and
=HP

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Steam Governor Model

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Steam Governor Model


dPSV
1
TSV
PSV PC
dt
R
s
where
s
max
0 PSV PSV

Steam valve limits

R = .05 (5% droop)

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TGOV1 Model
Standard model that is close to this is
TGOV1

Here T1 corresponds to TSV and T3 to TCH


TGOV1 is not commonly used because it is too simple,
but it is a good place to start; Dt is used to model
turbine damping and is often zero
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IEEEG1
A common stream turbine model, is
the IEEEG1, originally introduced in the
below 1973 paper

In this model K=1/R


Uo and Uc are rate
limits

It can be used to represent


cross-compound units, with
high and low pressure steam

IEEE Committee Report, Dynamic Models for Steam and Hydro Turbines in Power System
29 1973, pp
Studies, Transactions in Power Apparatus & Systems, volume 92, No. 6, Nov./Dec.
1904-15