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ECE 151a / CpE 151a

Design Project 1
Instructor-in-Charge:
ENGR. MARY GRACE P. BEAO, MSc.

DESIGN PROJECT GUIDELINES


I. THESIS ADVISER

The Thesis Adviser is a person of professional competence in the area or field he/she is
tapped to advice.

A. Selection of Thesis Adviser

The students must select their adviser based on recommendation of the Special Project
Committee as early as the proposal writing stage. In no case shall the adviser accept more than 5
groups of advisees to allow sufficient time for consultation.

B. Qualifications of Thesis Adviser


The adviser must possess the following qualifications:

1. Masters degree, or at least 9 postgraduate academic units, or its equivalent in the field
relevant to the research topics or problems proposed by the students.
2. Experience in writing a thesis or scholarly research paper.
3. Relevant professional experience or expertise in the specific field of students research
topics or problems.
4. Licensed Engineer. (Not Applicable for BSIE and BSCpE).

C. Responsibilities of the Thesis Adviser

1. Submits schedule of consultation to the Instructor-in-Charge and conduct


meeting with the students based on the schedule submitted.

regular

2. Assists and guides the students on matters pertaining to the conduct of researchparticularly in the formulation of questionnaires, in the analysis and evaluation of gathered
data, and in collaboration with the statistical
consultant(if any), in the interpretation of
data.
3. Makes the necessary correction to whatever output that will be submitted by
the
students and to return these corrections not later than two weeks from the
time of
submission.
4. Discusses and resolves conflict with the Instructor-in-Charge on both
substantive and
methodological aspects of the paper. In no case should the
Adviser declare in the presence of
the students that the Instructor-in-Charge has
committed errors- both factual and
interpretative. The same is also expected of
the Instructor-in-charge. Likewise, the adviser
is expected to discuss with the
students in the presence of the Instructor-in-Charge, any
substantive disagreement on the advice given by the instructor-in-charge. The students,
together with the instructor-in-charge and adviser should resolve disagreements
with the aim
of providing the best workable solution.
5. Provides not only quantity time but quality advice to students.
6. Be present during the final oral presentation of the group.

D. Other Duties of the Thesis Adviser


Before oral defense:
1. Conducts regular consultations.

2. Accepts outputs submitted by the students and make the necessary


corrections.
3. Suggests to students relevant books, journals and other published studies.
4. Prepares the students for oral defense.
During the oral defense:
1. Makes himself/herself available throughout the proceedings.
2. Can be called up to clarify, if necessary, certain points being raised by the
panel so as to help the students figure out the answers.
After the oral defense:
1. Sees to it that the students do the required revisions.
2. Continues to supervise the revision of the paper.

E. REQUIREMENTS FOR RESEARCH/PROJECT STUDY ADVISING

As stipulated in the course syllabus, the thesis or the equivalent research work entails an
in-depth study and an extensive investigation of a problem. It must show originality and
should contribute to the existing goals, thrusts, and objectives, and should manifest the
students competence in research/project study.
The student and the adviser should agree on a timetable of research activities and the
student should make a report of his/her progress based on this timetable. The adviser should
make sure that there is progress in the students research.
The adviser should be available for student consultation according to their agreed-upon
schedule.

F. REMUNERATION

Thesis Adviser is paid an honorarium per group advised. The amount is given after the
students have presented the research paper to a group of panelists and made the necessary
revisions.
The assignment of an adviser is contingent upon the students submission of an approved
concept paper or research proposal.

G. THE ADVISER AND THE ADVISEE

Special Project Committee recommends the adviser, subject to prior


consultation with the Instructor-in-Charge and the students.
If circumstances under which the adviser and advisee are working
hinder the progress of the advisees study, either adviser or advisee may
request the termination of their relationship. To take effect, either party
may write the department chair a letter which should be signed by both to
indicate that the termination is mutually agreed upon. Once the letter is
received, the department chair will look for a replacement for the
outgoing adviser. The replacement must come from among the current
panel members (if the panel has been convened), or from the faculty of
the department, the selection of whom will be based on the same criteria
in Qualifications of Thesis Adviser. The department chair will then write a
formal notice of change of adviser to the Dean, copies of which will be
sent to the outgoing adviser, the advisee, and the new adviser.

II. DEFENSE GUIDELINES/PROCEDURE

A. FOR PROJECT STUDY/DESIGN TITLE DEFENSE

The student hands in the required number of copies of the research/project proposal to the
panelists (College Dean, Department Chair and 1 full time faculty) at least three working days before
the defense.
The student defends the title before a panel duly constituted for the purpose.
B. FOR PRE-FINAL AND FINAL PROJECT STUDY/DESIGN DEFENSE
The student must present a full draft of his/her project study/design.
The student must submit the required number of copies to the Instructor-in-Charge three working
days before the date of oral defense.
The panel shall deliberate on the grade that students deserve on the basis of the quality of the
paper and performance in the oral defense and on whether the project study/design can be nominated
for the Best Design Project/Project Feasibility Study Award. The panel shall sign the Oral Defense
Report form for submission to the Instructor-in-Charge.

Conduct, Decorum and Ritual of Pre-Final/Final Defense


a. Conduct of Defense

Decorum: The oral defense is a formal academic activity. As such, proper decorum should be maintained
during and after the proceedings.
b. Ritual of Oral Defense
The Instructor-in-Charge introduces the candidate who is dressed in corporate attire. (2 minutes)
The candidate leads the opening prayer. (2 minutes)
The Instructor-in-Charge of the defense panel introduces the panel members. (3 minutes)
The candidate presents the highlights (extended abstract) of the design project/project study. (approx. 20
minutes)

After the candidates presentation, the panel chair opens and moderates the panel discussion/oral defense.

The panel chair formally ends the defense and the panel then evaluates, in private, the performance of the
candidates response to the panelists questions. (approx. 10 minutes)

After the panel deliberation, the chair of the panel calls back the candidate to announce the result of the
defense.
c. Grading System
The grading system as well as the guidelines on redefense are determined by each College.

d. Post-Defense Requirements
The revised version of a project study/design must be submitted to the oral defense panel members not later than two weeks from
the time of defense.
Students unable to submit the revised project study/design within the prescribed period shall be deemed to have failed the final
defense. As such, the student needs to repeat the entire project study/design cycle.
The revised version of a research/project study must first be approved by the adviser. Once approved by the adviser, it then is
submitted to the panel chair who must decide on the acceptability of the revision within one (1) week for title or one week for oral
after submission of the revised paper.
On the basis of the panel chairs approval, the panel members shall sign the requisite approval sheets to show their concurrence
that the revised project study/design fulfills substantially the stipulations made during the oral defense.
Upon successful completion of the final defense and upon revision of the study/design, the student must submit the following to
the department:
1) Two (2) compact discs (CDs) (of reputable brand) containing the version consistent with the approved project study/design by
the final defense panel (including annexes, tables, and the like) in non-editable Portable Document File (PDF) format, readable in a
standard computer, with CD and transparent case labeled as follows:
2) Title of research/project study
College and Program
Names of students (Last name, first name, middle name)
Month and year of completion
Name and signature of faculty adviser
3) Signed Approval Sheets
4) Seven (7) Hardbound copies: one for Registrar, one for the Office of the VPAA, one for the University Library, one for
College, one for the adviser and 2 for the group.

the

E. Selection of Outstanding Project Design/Project Study


The following are the general criteria for the selection of outstanding research/project study:

Significant contribution to the development or refinement of knowledge or improvement of practice.

Originality and creativity.

Practicability in the discipline where it applies; the extent to which the study reflects and responds to
practical problems.

Identification of a strong theoretical framework within which the problem is developed.

Clarity and coherence of presentation and accuracy of language.

However, each college has a list of specific criteria for the selection of outstanding project
study/design.
A candidates project study/design defense panel nominates him/her for the outstanding project
study/design award. Nomination is made during the defense deliberation.
For evaluation purposes, the candidate submits to the department chair a copy of the paper that
was used for the oral defense.
Note: It is defense copy of the paper, NOT the revised copy, that is submitted by the candidate.
The department chair then recommends to the Screening Committee the candidate for the award.

III. ACADEMIC DISHONESTY


Pamantasan ng Cabuyao strongly prohibits plagiarism and other acts
of academic dishonesty. Any form of plagiarism will be dealt with
accordingly as stipulated in Chapter 7 (Student Conduct and Discipline)
Section B (Major Misconduct and Serious Offense) of Pamantasan ng
Cabuyao Student Handbook.

Schedule of Defense:

Title Defense:

1 week before Prelim Exam

DOST Certification of Originality Required

Pre-Final Defense (Chapters 1-3): 2 weeks before Final Exam

Final Defense:

2 weeks before (Graduating Students Final Exam)

LECTURE 1:
Preliminaries &
Chapter 1
Instructor-in-Charge:
ENGR. MARY GRACE P. BEAO, MSc.

CRITERIA FOR SELECTING SA RESEARCH


TOPIC

1. Relevant to the students major field of specialization;

2. Original;

3. Significant to knowledge;

4. Feasible and within the time and resources available to


the students, and;

5. Reflective of the background and research competence


of the students.

STANDARDS FOR RESEARCH REPORT


WRITING

PRELIMINARY PARTS
1. Title Page
2. Approval Sheet
3. Dedication
4. Acknowledgements
5. Abstract
6. Table of Contents
7. List of Tables
8. List of Figures

APPROVAL SHEET
This

is to prove that the authors have


passed the requirements needed for the
design project

This

is signed by the adviser, panel, and the


Dean

This

also states the grade obtained by the


author/s.

DEDICATION
This

is the page for dedicating the design


project to certain people or groups who
have inspired the researchers while doing
the design project.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
This

is focused on expressing gratitude to


organizations, agencies or individuals who, in one
way or another, have aided the researchers in
finishing the design project.

ABSTRACT
The

ABSTRACT is a brief summary of the research.


Generally, it gives a concise report of the following:
1. The Problem;
2. The Methodology used;
3. The Findings, and;
4. Conclusions of the study.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
The

table of contents is essentially a topic outline


of the design project

It

is compiled by listing the headings in the design


project down to whichever level you choose.

LIST OF TABLES/LIST OF FIGURES

Include a list of figures (illustrations) and a list of tables if


you have one or more items in these categories.

Use a separate page for each list.

List the number, caption, and page number of every figure


and table in the body of the design project

ORGANIZATION OF THE REPORT

The body of the design projects contains the five main chapters . These are:
Chapter 1

THE PROBLEM AND ITS BACKGROUND

Chapter 2

REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE AND STUDIES

Chapter 3

METHODOLOGY

Chapter 4

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

Chapter 5

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS, CONCLUSIONS & RECOMMENDATONS

Chapter 1
THE PROBLEM AND ITS BACKGROUND

Chapter 1 is headed as THE PROBLEM AND ITS BACKGROUND the introductory


part of chapter 1 consists of the following:
1. Introduction
2. Background of the Study
3. Theoretical Framework
4. Statement of the Problem
5. Conceptual Framework
6. Design Objectives
7. Assumptions
8. Scope and Limitations
9. Significance of the Study
10. Definition of Terms

Introduction
Its

primary goal is to demonstrate the importance ,


interest and originality of the design project. It should
include a statement of the research question that your
project investigates. This statement should give readers a
broad sense of the current research on your topic, whats
at stake in learning more about the topic and how your
specific project changes what people know about the
topic. The introductions tone should be confident without
being arrogant or dismissive. Finally, the introduction
should define key terms youll use throughout the study,
as well as a map out the rest of the design project.

Background of the Study

This is a brief statement of the origin of the problem. It is


an account describing the circumstances which suggested
the research. It may include a justification of the
selection or choice of the study.
Paragraph 1: The Problem
Paragraph 2: The proposed solution
Paragraph 3: Justification

THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK

Provide the organization of the study. It guides the researcher/s in the


interpretation of the results, the importance of the theory is dependent on
the degree of research-based evidence and level of its theory development.
There are four levels of theory development:
1. Factor isolating (describe phenomena)
2. Factor relating (explain phenomena)
3. Situation relating (predict the relationships between/among phenomena)
4. Situation producing (control phenomena and relationships)

Provides a broad explanation of relationships that exists between concepts.

It is based on ONE theory. The concepts of the study relate back to the
theory.

Statement of the Problem

The Problem studied must be shown as one which arose from a situation
of need or of unresolved difficulties. The reader must be made to
recognize the need.
1. The problem should be stated precisely, accurately, and clearly.

2. It can be stated either in the declarative n(statement of


objectiveness) or interrogative (question) form.
3. It can be either the main statement/question, or a number of series of
statements/questions, or a combination, or a combination of these forms.
NOTE: 1 Main question + several specific questions
4. The problem should be defined in terms of the data that can be
obtained.

CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK

When no existing theory fits the concepts that the researcher wishes to
study, the researcher constructs a conceptual framework that can be
used to describe and begin to explain the relationships of the concept.

Elaborates the research problem in relation to relevant in relation to


relevant literature. This section may summarize the major (dependent
and independent) variable in your research. The framework may be
summarized in a block diagram that presents the major variables and
their relationships. It should also cover the following:
1. Existing research and its relevance for your topic
2. Key ideas or constructs in you approach
3. Identify and discuss the variables related to the problem
4. Conceptualized relationships between variables

Cont
Independent
Dependent
Intervening

variables (presumed cause)

Variables (presumed effect)

Variables (other variables that


influence the effect of the independent variable)

DESIGN OBJECTIVES

Defines the specific aims of the study and it should be clearly stated in the
introduction of the research protocol.

It is a concrete statement describing what the research is trying to achieve. A


well worded objective will be SMART
S = Specific
M = Measurable
A = Attainable
R = Realistic
T = Time-bound

It should be Relevant, Feasible, Logical, Observable, Unequivocal & Measurable

It is a purpose that can be reasonably achieved within the expected timeframe &
with available resources.

ASSUMPTIONS
A realistic

expectation which is something that we


believe to be true. However , no adequate
evidence exists to support this belief.

It

is an act of faith which does not have empirical


evidence to support.

Provide

a basis to develop theories& research


instruments & therefore influence the
development & implement of research.

Cont
ASSUMPTIONS

HYPOTHESIS

Basically beliefs & ideas that


we hold to be true

A prediction

Often with little or no


evidence & are not
statistically tested in
research

Can be statistically tested &


may be accepted or rejected

Beliefs about the variables

Predictions about the


relationship of two or more
variables

Based on the beliefs, the


researchers attempt to
discover the correlation

Predict a relation between


variables & statistically
tested to conclude the study

Scope and Limitations of the Study

The scope of the study is expected to indicate a reasonable


area which is large enough to be significant but narrow enough
to permit careful treatment.

The scope of the problem should be stated specifically. The


nature of any subjects treated. Their number, the treatments
they receives, any limitations that exist in the reference
population, instruments, or research design that should be
stated.

Limitation is a phrase or aspect of the investigation that may


affect the result of the study adversely but over which you have
no control.

It must be stated honestly.

Significance of the Study


This

part is usually required of research


proposals so that the research can be justified.
In the final report, however, the significance
does not have to be stressed.

DEFINITION OF TERMS
The

definition of terms must be arranged in


alphabetically. It must be also stated if you
used your definition of terms in technically
or operationally.

Chapter 2
REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE AND STUDIES

A separate chapter consisting of the following is recommended for


the Design Project:
1. Conceptual Literature (Related Literature)
2. Research Literature

(Related Studies)

Note: At least 5 each for local and foreign literature and studies
3. Relevance to the Present Study

RELATED LITERATURE

In this part you must get your data and information from any books,
magazines and news papers. You must label your published material
with local or foreign.
1. Must be organized to cover specific problems.

2. Must take all the evidences about the problem with the authors
experiences.
3. As much as possible, get the latest published materials. Avoid old
published materials.
4. It must be related to your topic. If not, do not get it.

RELATED STUDIES

In this part you must get your data and information from
unpublished/published materials such as previous studies, research or
theses. In some format, you must label your materials with local or
foreign.
1. This should be organized to cover the specific problems.

2. You must take note all of the evidences that the previous
researcher came up
3. The materials should not be older than 5 years.
4. It must be related to your topic. If not, do not get it.

Relevance to the Present Study


On

this part, you must have statements on how


the studies and literatures you gathered help
the researchers in their current study then
related those in to your study.

Chapter 3
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

Chapter 3 is headed as RESEARCH METHODOLOGY the introductory


part of chapter 3 consists of the following:
1. Project/Research Design
2. Project Development
3. Operation/Testing Procedure
4. Evaluation Procedure
5. Evaluation Criteria
6. Instruments and Techniques Used

Methodology Defined & Described


Methodology

and Method are often (incorrectly) used


interchangeable.

METHODOLOGY = study of the general approach to inquiry


in a given field.
METHOD = the specific techniques, tools or procedures
applied to achieve a given objective.

Project/Research Design
The

blueprint of the study. The design of


the study defines the research method. It is
the framework that has been created to
seek answer to research questions.

Examples of Research Methods:


1.

HISTORICAL METHOD = comprises the techniques and guidelines by


which historians use primary sources and other evidence, including the
evidence of archaeology, to research and then to write histories in the
form of accounts in the past.

2.

DESCRIPTIVE RESEARCH = is used to describe characteristics of a


phenomenon or a population being studied. It does not answer
questions about how/when/why the characteristics occurred. Rather it
addresses the what question.

3.

DEVELOPMENTAL RESEARCH = as opposed to simple instructional


development, has been defined as the systematic study of designing,
and developing instructional programs, processes and products that
must meet criteria of internal consistency and effectiveness.

Project Development
It

is the process that takes improvement from


concept through construction.

Discuss

the activities that the will undergo from


the concept to construction.

Operation/Testing Procedure
Standardized

and documented process


for performing and experiment or
conducting an evaluation.

Evaluation Procedure

EVALUATION = is the structured interpretation and giving of


meaning to predicted or actual impacts of proposal or results. It
looks at the original objectives, and at what is either predicted or
what was accomplished and how will it be accomplished. So
evaluation can be formative, that is taking place during the
development of a concept or proposal , project or organization,
with the intention of improving the value or the effectiveness of
the proposal, project or organization. It can also be assumptive,
drawing lessons from a completed action or project or an
organization at a later point in time or circumstance.

Evaluation Criteria
A

benchmark, standard, or yardstick against


which accomplishment, conformance,
performance and suitability of an individual,
alternative, activity, product, or plan, as well
as of risk-reward ratio is measured.

Instruments and Techniques Used

Described as device used to collect the data.

Facilitate variable observation and measurement.

TYPES OF RESEARCH INSTRUMENTS:


1.

Questionnaire

2.

Checklist

3.

Distribution

4.

Interview

5.

Observation

6.

Records

7.

Experimental Approach

8.

Survey Approach

Chapter 4
RESULTS AND DISCUSSION
Chapter

4 is headed as RESULTS AND DISCUSSION


the introductory part of chapter 4 consists of the
following:
1. Project Technical Description
2. Project Structure/Organization
3. Project Limitations and Capabilities
4. Project Evaluation

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

The Results Section should set out your key experimental result, including any
statistical analysis (if there are any) and whether or not of these are significant.

Note: If you are unsure whether to include certain results, go back to your
research questions and decide whether the results are relevant to them. It does not
matter whether they are supportive or not, its about relevance. If they are
relevant, you should include them

Discussion Section, this section has four purposes:


1. Interpret and explain your results
2. Answer your research questions
3. Justify your approach
4. Critically evaluate your study

Cont

The Discussion Section therefore need to review your findings in the


context of the literature and the existing knowledge about the
subject

You also need to demonstrate that you understand the limitations of


your design and the implications of your finding for policy and practice.
This section should be written in present tense.

In the Results and Discussion, you present your result and discuss
them by:
1. Commenting on the Results obtained
2. Interpreting what the results mean
3. Explaining any results which are unexpected

Project Technical Description


The

Project Technical Description is a


specific description of your prototype and
its features, but its not a design for your
project.

Project Structure/Organization

The main function of the project structure is to define


standards the team used during the project.

The Project Organization defines the human infrastructure of


the project. This task is designed to define the project
organizational chart, the roles and the relationship of the
project team. The Project Organization Technique that is
used in this step provides a standard set of roles and
responsibilities which can be customized for a particular
project. This requires all personnel resources required, both
full time and part time.

Project Limitations and Capabilities


Project

Limitations something that limits,


as some factor in make up which restricts
the scope of the prototypes operations.

Project

Capabilities are elements that


define WHAT the prototype can do.

Project Evaluation
Project

Evaluation is a systematic and objective


assessment of an ongoing or completed project.
The aim is to determine the relevance and level
of achievement of project objectives,
development effectiveness, impact and
sustainability.

Chapter 5
SUMMARY OF FINDINGS, CONCLUSIONS &
RECOMMENDATONS

This is the last chapter of the Design Project and the most important
part because it is where the findings, and the whole design project for
that matter, are SUMMARIZED; generalizations in form of
CONCLUSIONS are made; the RECOMMENDATIONS for the solution of
problems discovered in the study are addressed to those concerned.

Chapter 5 is headed as SUMMARY OF FINDINGS, CONCLUSIONS &


RECOMMENDATONS the introductory part of chapter 5 consists of the
following:
1. Summary of Findings
2. Conclusions
3. Recommendations

Summary of Findings

Guidelines in writing the summary of findings. The following should be the


characteristics of the summary of findings:

1. There should be brief statement about the main purpose of the study, the
period of the study, and method of research used. There should be no
explanations

Conclusions

These are brief, generalized statements in answer to the


general and each of the specific sub-problems.

Flexibility is considered in making of conclusions.

Conclusions may be used as generalizations from a micro


to a macro-level or vice versa (ZOOM LENS approach)

Recommendations

They should be based on the findings and conclusions of


the study.

Recommendations may be specific or general or both.


They may include suggestions for further studies.

They should be in non-technical language.

They should be feasible, workable, flexible, doable and


adaptable.

Bibliography
List

of the books to in a scholarly work.

List

of the books of a specific author or publisher,


or on a specific subject.

The

history or systematic description of books,


their authorship, printing, publications, editions,
etc.

Appendices
Supplementary

materials at the end of the


study, usually of an explanatory, statistical
or bibliographic nature.

Researchers Profile
Includes

basic information (e.g. photo,


affiliation, and position), contact
information (e.g. address, email, and
contact number) and educational
history

For Formatting refer to:


PUBLICATION MANUAL OF THE
AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGICAL
th
ASSOCIATION 6 EDITION