Mixtures and

solutions
HOMEWORK
10/12-10/14
WEEK 9: 390-410
Plus complete p. 409-410

• VOCABULARY...








DISSOLVING
COLLOID
SUSPENSION
FILTRATION
MAGNETIC ATTRACTION
EVAPORATION
SIFTING
PURE SUBSTANCE
PH SCALE-ACIDS/BASES

Wednesday 10/12/16

• TO DO: QUIETLY

GET ISN NOTEBOOK

• 2. PICK UP YOUR BOOK FROM CART NEXT TO ISN
AS YOU ARE WALKING IN, PLEASE BE SEATED
AND WORKING AT BELL!!!!!

– TODAY’S Sci-Spot Question:

8TH Grade: Differentiate
between compounds and
mixtures?
When finished read HW pages and take
notes in ISN

Compound vs Mixture

ISN NOTES
• 1. “Matching Definitions” review
worksheet
• 2. Discussion: chemical bondingcovalent (sharing electrons) versus
Ionic Bonds-giving away electrons
• 3. Video covalent and ionic bonds
• Chemical-bonds-ionic-vs-covalent.html

Thursday 10/13/16

• TO DO: QUIETLY

GET ISN NOTEBOOK

• 2. PICK UP YOUR BOOK FROM CART NEXT TO ISN
AS YOU ARE WALKING IN, PLEASE BE SEATED AND
WORKING AT BELL!!!!!

– TODAY’S Sci-Spot Question:

8TH Grade: Can compound be
physically separated like
mixtures-explain why or why
not?
When finished read HW pages and take
notes in ISN

Review Elements,
Compounds, Mixtures





Timer: 8 min
REVIEW
Think & Share with Shoulder Partner
Take Turns Answering Questions
Elements/Compounds/Mixtures worksheet
After timer sounds share with whole class.

Separating Mixtures Review
• Salt-separating-mixtures TWIG
• Methods-of-separating-mixtures
STUDY

Friday 10/14/16

• TO DO: QUIETLY

GET ISN NOTEBOOK

• 2. PICK UP TEXTBOOK AT THE DOOR AND BE
SEATED AT BELL!!!

– TODAY’S Sci-Spot Question:

8TH Grade: What are
acids/bases and what is PH
scale?
– Today is Spot Quiz, review all your Sci-Spots!

Notes
• Please take notes on Acids/Bases/PH
Scale
• Acidic-basic-neutral-solutions-STUDY

Spot Check 7 + Reading
Check Quiz
Voice Level 0=Silence

1. When finished with “Spot Check”
quiz
start working on the Reading Check
Quiz,
you can use your notebooks.

When all done & time allows Video:STUDY

Element, Molecule, or
Compound?

Element, Molecule, or
Compound?

Element, Molecule, or
Compound?

Element, Molecule, or
Compound?

Element, Molecule, or
Compound?

Atoms

Molecules &
Compounds

ALL living &
nonliving
things

Pure Substances
• A single kind of matter
that has a specific
makeup or composition.
• Pure substances can NOT
be separated easily, or
sometimes, not at all.
• A pure substance can be
an element or a
compound.

Examples of Pure
Substances



Water
Sugar
Salt
Oxygen

Mixture
• Two or more substances that are
together in the same place, but their
atoms are not chemically bonded.
• Mixtures CAN be physically
separated

Examples of
Mixtures




Salt water
Sand
Trail Mix
Cookie dough
Lemonade

Heterogeneous
• A mixture in which you can see the
different parts and can easily
separate them out.
Examples: Trail Mix, Fruit Salad,
Chicken Noodle Soup

Homogeneous
• A mixture that is so evenly mixed
that you can’t differentiate the parts
simply by looking at the mixture.
Examples: Lemonade, Smoothie,
Ketchup

Solution-homogeneous
mixture
• A type of mixture where one part of
the mixture is dissolved in the other
part.
• Examples:
– Sweet Tea
– Salt water
– Lemonade
***Ex: Air, Metal Alloys!

Saturation
• When you have added so much of a
solute that no more dissolves.

Separating a Mixture
• Sometimes a scientist might need to
separate a mixture or solution into its
different parts. There are 5 basic
ways that you can use the properties
of matter to separate a mixture.

Magnetic Attraction
• Using a magnet to pull magnetic
objects out of a mixture.
• Example: Using a magnet to pull
pieces of metal out of sand.

Filtration
• Pouring a mixture through a filter
to separate solids from liquids.
• Example: Sand and water poured
through a filter will separate the
sand.

Distillation
• Liquids are heated until one of them
boils, and turns into gas, which is
moved away from the original liquid.
The gas cools into the separated liquid.
• Example: Distillation of alcohol
• Alcohol boils at 78o C
• Water boils at 100o C

Evaporation
• The liquid evaporates away, leaving
the solids behind.
• Example: Salt water. The water
will evaporate and leave the salt
behind.

SIFTING
• SEPARATING SMALLER PARTICLES
SOLDS FROM LARGER ONES
• USING SCREEN
• EXAMPLE; CHEFS SIFTING FLOUR OR
• SIFTING GROVEL FOR PRECIOUS
METALS

Acids, Bases, and Salts
• A compound can be described by
classifying it as an acid, base, or salt.
Each of these classifications
describes the characteristics of a
group of compounds.

Acids
• React with metals
• React with carbonates
• Taste sour

• Acids turn blue litmus paper red

Examples of Acids



Citrus Juice
Soda
Hydrochloric Acid (in your stomach)
Sulfuric Acid (in batteries)

Bases
• Taste Bitter
• Feel Slippery
• Do NOT react with metal or
carbonates

• Bases turn red litmus paper blue

Examples of Bases




Baking Soda
Ammonia
Cocoa Beans
Shampoo
Soap

Salts
• A neutral compound that can be
made from the combination of an
acid and a base.
• Are made of crystals
Examples: Table Salt, copper sulfate
(blue) potassium dichromate
(orange)

pH Scale
• A scale used to measure acids and
bases
• Ranges from 0-14
• 7 is neutral (not acid or base)

• Anything below 7 is an acid.
• The lower the number the stronger the
acid.

• Anything above 7 is a base.
• The higher the number the stronger the
base.

Example of a pH scale