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MULTIPLE

INTELLIGENCES
(MI)

MI

refers to a learnerbased philosophy that


characterizes human
intelligence as having
multiple dimensions that
must be acknowledged
and developed in
education.

HOWARD

GARDNER (1943):
He is an American developmental
psychologist. He is best known for
histheory of multiple intelligences.

He claims that traditional IQ tests


measure only logic and language but
the brain has other important types
of intelligences.
Traditional IQ: Intelligence as a single,
unchanged, inborn capacity.

He

argues that all humans have


these intelligences but people
differ in the strengths and
combinations of intelligences.

Gardner

proposed a view of
natural human talents that is
labeled the Multiple Intelligences
Model = A variety of learning
Styles.

Gardner

names eight native


intelligences:

1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
7)
8)

Linguistic
Logical/mathematical
Spatial
Musical
Bodily/Kinesthetic
Interpersonal
Intrapersonal
Naturalist

Theory of language and


language learning.
Gardners work was interpreted by some general
educators.
The application of it in language Teaching is recent.
Multiple intelligence proposes to look at the
language of an individual and the second language
to be integrated in the language learner and user.
This can be done using group factor (intelligence)
which is the ability to deal with cognitive complexity.
You can have several Intelligences but its better to
have a fully exercised intelligence.

Design: Objectives, syllabus, learning


activities, roles of learners, teachers, and
materials.
MI

Instruction: No purely
linguistic goals.
Class as a setting for a series of
educational support systems.
Language learner as a better
designer of their own learning
experiences.

No recommended syllabus, but a basic


developmental sequence of four stages:
1)Awaken the intelligence: Multisensory experiences
where learners can be sensitized to the properties of
objects and events in the surrounding world.
2) Amplify the Intelligence: Volunteering objects and
events, defining with others, their properties and
contexts of experience.
3) Teach with/for the Intelligence: Intelligence linked
with some aspect of language learning via
worksheets and small-group projects and discussion.
4) Transfer of the Intelligence: Reflection on the
previous stages and relating to challenges outside.

1)
2)

3)

4)

5)

Students work alone or in pairs on intelligence of


their own choosing through five types of projects:
Multiple intelligence projects: designed to
stimulate particular intelligences
Curriculum-based projects: based on curriculum
content areas categorized according to particular
intelligences.
Thematic-based projects: a theme from the
curriculum is set as the base to expand the
different intelligences.
Resource-based projects: provide students with
opportunities to research a topic using multiple
intelligences.
Student-choice projects: designed by students on
particular intelligences.

List of alternative views as to how the MI model can


be used in a classroom:
1) Play to strength: structure the learning material for
each individual around their strengths.
2) Variety is the spice: with a teacher-directed rich mix
of learning activities calling upon the eight different
intelligences
3) Pick a tool to suit the job: link the learning of
different levels and functions of the language to the
most appropriate kind of MI activity
4) All sizes fit one: every individual exercises all
intelligences with the intention of developing this idea
of whole person within each learner.
5) Me and my people: study language in a context that
recognizes and honors a range of diversely valued
intelligences.

MI

design is not prescriptive.


Teachers are encouraged not to think of
themselves merely as Language teachers;
they become curriculum developers, lesson
designers and analysts, activity finders or
inventors.
Learners are encouraged to see their goals
in broader terms; they learn how to use and
develop their intelligences.
MI is rich in proposals for lesson
organization, multisensory activity
planning, and in using real-life content and
materials.

Procedure
Awaken the
intelligence

Activate and make learners aware of


sensory bases through experiences

Stage 2

Amplify the
Intelligence

Describing objects according to the


five physical senses (working in
groups)

Stage 3

Teach
with/for
Intelligence

Larger sections of lesson(s) used


to reinforce and emphasize the
relation between sensory
experiences and language
(working in groups)

Stage 4

Transfer of
Intelligence

Applying theory of the lesson to


daily living (Reflection)

Stage 1

Lesson plan dealing


with description of
physical objects
Linguistic
intelligence

Gives students
opportunities to
develop:
Visual/spatial
Intelligence

Logical
intelligence

Describing
THE object
Determinin
g WHICH
object is
being
described

Intrapersonal
Intelligence
Interpersona
l Intelligence

Determinin
g HOW to
describe
things
Working
in
groups

Reflecting on
ones own
involvement in
the lesson

Conclusion

Multiple Intelligences is an
increasingly popular approach that
focuses on the learners unique
nature and potential development.
It also provides a rich source for
successful lesson planning and
design, as it can be used to cover a
vast majority of learners needs.