GRID COMPUTING

SEMINAR ON 28TH AUG. 2009 AT NIIT SURAT

GRIDS IN IT HISTORY

BUILDING A GRID
GRIDPOWERED PROJECTS

WHAT IS GRID COMPUTING

GRIDS AND CLOUDS: WHAT'S IN A NAME?

IDEAS BEHIND GRID

WHO WILL PAY FOR GRID COMPUTING?

GRID COMPUTING

GRID COMPUTING

WHAT IS GRID COMPUTING? 
Several Million Computers From All Over The World, And Owned By Thousands Of Different People. They Include Desktops, Laptops, Supercomputers, Data Vaults, And Instruments Like Mobile Phones. Now Imagine That All Of These Computers Can Be Connected To Form A Single, Huge And Super-powerful Computer! This Huge, Sprawling, Global Computer Is What Many People Dream "The Grid" Will Be. "The Grid" Takes Its Name From An Analogy With The Electrical "Power Grid". The Idea Was That Accessing Computer Power From A Computer Grid Would Be As Simple As Accessing Electrical Power From An Electrical Grid".

The Grid
You would never worry about where the computer power you are using comes from, if it is from a supercomputer in Germany, a computer farm in India or a laptop in New Zealand. You simply know that when you plug your computer in to the Internet, it will get the computer power you need to do the job. The infrastructure that makes this possible is called "the Grid". It links together computing resources such as PCs, workstations, servers, storage elements, and provides the mechanism needed to access them. The Grid is be pervasive: remote computing resources would be accessible from different platforms, including laptops, PDAs and mobile phones, and you will simply access the Grid through your web browser.

GRID COMPUTING

GRIDS IN IT HISTORY
Information technology is constantly on the move. Many of the ideas behind grid computing are not new. For example:

"SHARED COMPUTING POWER
In the 1960s and 1970s, computing was dominated by huge mainframe computers that were shared by whole organizations.

"COMPUTING AS A UTILITY"
In 1965, the developers of an operating system called Multics (an ancestor of Unix, which is an ancestor of Linux), first suggested the idea that access to computing resources could be like access to water, gas and electricity something that you pays for according to the amount that you use.

GRID COMPUTING

GRIDS AND CLOUDS: WHAT'S IN A NAME?
First of all, what are they now?
Grids - A grid is a collection of computers, usually owned by multiple parties and in multiple locations, connected together such that users can share access to their combined power. Clouds - A cloud is a collection of computers, usually owned by a single party, connected together such that users can lease access to a share of their combined power. 

Grids And Clouds Are Much The Same: Both Grids And Clouds Have Adopted The Concept Of IT As A Service, Although Grids Are More Likely To Offer Free Access To Shared Resources, While Clouds Have A Pay-as-you-go Approach. 

Grids And Clouds Are Also Very Different: Where Grid Technology Focuses On Helping Different Groups To Share Access To Their Shared Resources, Cloud Computing Aims To Provide It Services To Businesses On Demand .

GRID COMPUTING

FIVE BIG IDEAS:
OPEN STANDARDS: Interoperability between different grids is a big goal, and is driven forward by the adoption of open standards for grid development, making it possible for everyone can contribute constructively to grid development. Standardization also encourages industry to invest in developing commercial grid services and infrastructure. THE DEATH OF DISTANCE: you should be able to access to computer resources from whereever you are. RESOURCE SHARING: Global sharing is the very essence of grid computing. SECURE ACCESS: Trust between resource providers and users is essential, especially when they don't know each other. Sharing resources conflicts with security policies in many individual computer centers, and on individual PCs, so getting grid security right is crucial.

RESOURCE USE: Efficient, balanced use of computing resources is essential.

GRID COMPUTING

BUILDING A GRID
Want to set up a grid? There are three things you can't do without...
THE ARCHITECTURE Just like civil engineers building a bridge, software engineers building a grid must specify an overall design before they start work. This design is called the grid architecture and identifies the fundamental components of a grid's purpose and function.

THE HARDWARE A grid depends on underlying hardware: without computers and networks, you can't have a grid!

THE MIDDLEWARE Middleware is the "glue" that makes grid computing possible. Middleware coordinates all the different grid resources to create a coherent whole. Middleware is conceptually "in the middle" of operating systems software (like Windows or Linux) and applications software (like a weather forecasting programme). ''GRIDIFYING'' YOUR APPLICATION An application that ordinarily runs on a stand-alone PC must be "gridified" before it can run on a grid. Just like "webifying" applications to run on a web browser, grid users need to "gridify" their applications to run on a grid. "Gridification" means configure applications for grid-enabled software.

GRID COMPUTING

GRID-POWERED PROJECTS
INTERNATIONAL GRID NATIONAL GRID FIELD-SPECIFIC GRIDS VOLUNTEER COMPUTING MIDDLEWARE PROJECTS GRID COMMUNICATION

AP GRID

Asia-Pacific Grid

EU-India Grid

Europe and India

AP Grid is a partnership for grid computing in the Asia-Pacific region, aiming to share technologies, resources and knowledge in order to build, nurture and promote grid technologies and applications. Partners come from 15 countries in the Asia-Pacific and beyond..

EU-India Grid will bring together over 500 multidisciplinary organizations to build a gridenabled e-science community aiming to boost R&D innovation across Europe and India.

INTERNATIONAL GRIDS
EGEE Enabling Grids for E-science EGEE is the largest multi-disciplinary grid infrastructure in the world, bringing together more than 120 organizations to provide scientific computing resources to the European and global research community. EGEE comprises 250 sites in 48 countries and more than 68,000 CPUs available to some 8,000 users, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. GridPP Grid for UK Particle Physics GridPP is a collaboration of particle physicists and computing scientists from the UK and CERN, who are building a grid for particle physics. The main objective is to develop and deploy a large-scale science grid in the UK for use by the worldwide particle physics community.

GRID COMPUTING

GRID-POWERED PROJECTS
INTERNATIONAL GRID NATIONAL GRID FIELD-SPECIFIC GRIDS VOLUNTEER COMPUTING MIDDLEWARE PROJECTS GRID COMMUNICATION

D-Grid

Germany

Swegrid

Sweden

The first D-Grid projects started in September 2005 with the goal of developing a distributed, integrated resource platform for highperformance computing and related services to enable the processing of large amounts of scientific data and information.

Swegrid is a Swedish national computational resource, consisting of 600 computers in six clusters at six different sites across Sweden. The sites are connected through the highperformance GigaSunet network.

NATIONAL GRID
National Grid Service UK TeraGrid U.S. supercomputing grid The NGS aims to provide coherent electronic access for UK researchers to all computational and data based resources and facilities. TeraGrid aims to build and deploy the world's largest, fastest, most comprehensive, distributed infrastructure for open scientific research.

GRID COMPUTING

GRID-POWERED PROJECTS
INTERNATIONAL GRID NATIONAL GRID FIELD-SPECIFIC GRIDS VOLUNTEER COMPUTING MIDDLEWARE PROJECTS GRID COMMUNICATION

Virolab

Study of infectious diseases NEESit Earthquake research The Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation is funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation to build a national virtual "collaboratory" for earthquake engineering research

ViroLab is developing a grid-based virtual laboratory for the study of infectious diseases. The laboratory provides tools that help medical doctors understand drug resistance and tailor drug therapy to specific patients, providing virologists with an advanced environment in which to study virus trends

FIELD-SPECIFIC GRIDS
CaBIG Cancer research and care caBIGŒ stands for the cancer Biomedical Informatics GridŒ, an information network enabling the cancer community ² researchers, physicians and patients ² to share data and knowledge. The components of caBIGŒ are widely applicable beyond cancer as well AstroGrid The global Virtual Observatory AstroGrid enables astronomers to explore and bookmark resources from around the world, find data, store and share files, query databases, plot and manipulate tables, cross-match catalogues, and build and run scripts to automate sequences of tasks.

GRID COMPUTING

GRID-POWERED PROJECTS
INTERNATIONAL GRID NATIONAL GRID FIELD-SPECIFIC GRIDS VOLUNTEER COMPUTING MIDDLEWARE PROJECTS GRID COMMUNICATION

Volunteer computing 
Volunteer computing uses computers belonging to ordinary people, like you, to create a computing grid that can rival the most powerful supercomputers in the world.
Are you interested in making the world a better place, but never have the time? Here's something you can do while you sleep! If you join a volunteer computing project, you agree to donate the idle cycles of your computer to specific research projects. 

What does that mean?
While you're not using your computer, someone else is using it for their research. While you're sleeping, or on the phone, or simply not using your computer's entire power, volunteer computing software uses your leftover computer power to solve calculations, perform simulations and otherwise contribute to some amazing projects. Whether you're into health, maths, climate change or finding life on other planets, volunteer computing has something for you.

GRID COMPUTING

GRID-POWERED PROJECTS
INTERNATIONAL GRID NATIONAL GRID FIELD-SPECIFIC GRIDS VOLUNTEER COMPUTING MIDDLEWARE PROJECTS GRID COMMUNICATION

Alchemi

Plug and play desktop grid computing

ESnet ESnet provides high performance connections to all major U.S. Department of Energy sites, as well as fast interconnections to more than 100 other networks, to allow scientists to make effective use of DOE research facilities and computing resources.

Alchemi is an open source software framework that allows you to painlessly aggregate the computing power of networked machines into a virtual supercomputer (desktop grid) and to develop applications to run on the grid.

MIDDLEWARE PROJECTS
Condor Condor middleware is open-source grid software that allows users to submit jobs in a reliable fashion to remote grids and batch systems including Globus, Condor, NorduGrid, Unicore, PBS, and LSF. From the University of Wisconsin-Madison in the U.S. gLite Lightweight Middleware for Grid Computing

gLite was produced as part of the EGEE project and provides a framework for building grid applications.

GRID COMPUTING

GRID-POWERED PROJECTS
INTERNATIONAL GRID NATIONAL GRID FIELD-SPECIFIC GRIDS VOLUNTEER COMPUTING MIDDLEWARE PROJECTS GRID COMMUNICATION

BELIEF-II BELIEF-II is a one-stop-shop for finding out about e-Infrastructures and a platform for communicating e-Infrastructures activities and results.

GridComputingPlanet "The gateway to grid computing," aiming to help the technical community stay abreast of grid developments.

GRID COMMUNICATION
iSGTW International Science Grid This Week A free weekly newsletter promoting the achievements of scientific grid computing, shares stories of grid-empowered research, scientific discoveries, and grid technology from around the world. EnterTheGrid A comprehensive directory on grid computing, comprising nearly 1000 entries. Run by Primeur magazine

GRID COMPUTING

Who will pay for grid computing? 
Analysis by researchers in the private sector suggests that one day you will have to pay real money to use a computing grid, just as you now pay to use an electrical grid.
Currently, grid computing is much like the World Wide Web: both were created for scientific purposes and are subsidized by the institutions that use it. The users are often shielded from the question of who pays for it, because their school or research centre covers the expense. Now that the Web is more widely accessible, there are several ways of gaining free access: a telecom company might give you free access in exchange for using their network, or a commercial site might give you free access if you put up with lots of advertisements on your screen. At the end of the day, though, someone is paying for you to use the Web, whether it be yourself through your phone bill, an advertiser, or the taxpayer whose money funds your university. 

Will The Same Be True For Grid Computing?
Perhaps. Grid technology already includes sophisticated accounting software to track who uses which resources. But how would users pay for their share of resources? There might be some bartering (you can use mine, but only if I can use yours), or perhaps payment in kind (I'll help you out with this, if you let me use that). But let's face it: money is a simple way to keep track of who is using how much of what, so many people think it will take over as the basic currency of grid computing. What do you think?

GRID COMPUTING

Motivated By Ruchi Verma

Presents By Ravi patodiya Harpreet singh

The End

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