CLIMATE

RESPONSIVE
ARCHITECTURE
Guidance:
Prof. Binit Kumar

Presented by:

Mithilesh Mandal
114AR0006

Sonakshi Bhattacharjee
114AR0024

Climate

Hot andHumid

Hot and dry

Composite

Location

15° N-15° S

15°-30° N & S

Near tropic of
Cancer and
Capricon

27°-32° C

43°-49° C

32°-43° C(dry)
27°-32° C(wet)

10°-18° C(cool
season)
27°-32° C(dry
season)

21°-27° C(dry)
24°-27° C(wet)

Temperatur
e

Day

Night 21°-29° C

Humidity

55-100%

10%-55%

20%-55%(dry)
55%-90%(wet)

Vapour Pressure

2500-3500 N/m²

750-1500 N/m²

1300-1600
N/m²
(dry)
2000-2500
N/m²
(wet)

Precipitation(annu
al)

2000-5000 mm

50mm

500-1300 mm

Sky condition

850-7000 cd/m²

1700-2500 cd/m²

Varies with
seasons

HOT AND DRY
Flat roof - is used because of sandstorms – not obstruct the wind
flow
Pitch roof - should be built as double layers
Small windows - to prevent sand and dust from entering the house
Thick wall – the entering of heat into the house during daytime
become slower and at night the cold air push the warm air to flow
outside and the building is maintained cold (ie: pyramid)
Concrete houses are built
Colors of the buildings - light / bright
Materials - crack and break up cause by high daytime temperature
and rapid cooling at night

HOT AND DRY .

to reduce the entering of solar radiation and daylight into the house More windows and the opening are wide Aprons .to prevent dirt on the wall Wide doors – wind shaft is built to enable heated air go outside Ceiling (high ceiling) – to prevent direct heat into the house .is still warm at night because of the high solar radiation during the day Pitch roof .is used act as a buffer to reduce the entering of heat into the house Gutters are built Plastered single layer wall – to prevent heat captured in the house Window hoods and balcony .HOT AND HUMID Wall .

HOT AND HUMID .

preferably with solid shutters.COMPOSITE Courtyard type buildings are very suitable A moderate dense.constructed of solid masonry and concrete. Large openings in opposite walls . low rise development Large projecting eaves and wide verandahs are needed in the warm-humid season as out door living areas . keep out the rain and provide shade Shading devices should preferably be of low thermal capacity Roof and external walls .to reduce sky glare.placed at the outside surfaces of external walls or roofs. Resistance insulation . .

COMPOSITE .

I  Case Study – II  Case Study – III  Case Study -IV .SHELTER DESIGNING  Case Study .

Vegetation (reduces the temperature. Small openings Double roof or white single roof Thick walls Big basin to collect rainwater Louvered windows pergolas a water body . • • • • • • • • • Courtyard or patio White colored walls (“cool” colours reduce heat reflection ). Arrangement of the houses in is very closely packed to each other. elevates the humidity level may reduce as well as increase the wind speed) .I Hot and dry climate OVERVIEW OF DESIGN PRINCIPLES. filter’s the dust in and around the house.CASE STUDY .

I .CASE STUDY .

CASE STUDY .I .

I .CASE STUDY .

I .CASE STUDY .

CASE STUDY .I .

II HOT AND HUMID CLIMATE OVERVIEW OF DESIGN PRINCIPLES• • • • • • • • • Resisting heat gain Promoting heat loss Landform and Waterbodies Open spaces and built form Orientation and Planform cross-ventilation. Semiopen spaces Building Envelope Fenestration .CASE STUDY .

177m2.II Project details Designers: Andrew Spiers (homeowner) and David Bridgman. Qantec-McWilliam Size: Approx. 2 bedroom Size of land: 80 hectares . MODE DESIGN Builder: Garrett Homes Engineer: Elisha Harris.CASE STUDY .

away from the river.2°C. . from late autumn through to late spring. from November to April.  The house is sited in the western half of the block. with mean maximum temperatures of 32°C and a mean minimum of 23. mean January rainfall is 423. on the highest point to make the most of seasonal winds: south-easterlies in the dry and north-westerlies in the wet. In the wet season.8mm. The fire season occurs during the dry.CASE STUDY .2mm in July. heavy monsoonal downpours and flooding. in the dry season. location and climate  Darwin River is a largely wooded rural suburb some 65km south-east of Darwin. from May to October.  During the wet season the region is prone to cyclone activity.  The Top End’s tropical climate has high humid summers and warm winters. rainfall drops to 1.II  Site.

CASE STUDY .  This home is built entirely with steel which has a low thermal mass. The home and outdoor living area are shaded year-round by the roof and eaves   The home has been orientated west-south-west/east-north- east to capture breezes common to this site The design makes the most of passive cooling principles. The roof is clad with steel and lined with insulation with an air gap to act as an additional insulative barrier to heat exchange. Vents in the roof ridge and apex exhaust heat.II  Design response  The home has a high-pitched roof that minimises sun exposure and creates a cathedral ceiling to maximise air circulation. The crossshaped plan ensures the home is only one room wide throughout to encourage cross ventilation. Solid internal walls have been placed on a north-west/south-east axis so they increase natural ventilation by not obstructing air paths   Windows are fitted with roller shutters to protect the house from fire or storm damage. .

CASE STUDY .II .

Encourage ventilation by locating windows properly. fins and trees. Increase shading on east and west walls by overhangs. Increase surface reflectivity by using light-coloured textures. Providing roof insulation and east and west wall insulation.III COMPOSITE CLIMATE – COLD AND DRY OVERVIEW OF DESIGN PRINCIPLES• • • • • • • Resisting heat gain Decrease exposed surface area by orientation and shape of the building. Increase air exchange rate with the help of courtyardS and Arrangement of openings. .CASE STUDY .

The building required to be heated almost throughout the year. the degree college and hill council have been built within a cold and dry climate.III Degree college and hill council.CASE STUDY . Leh. in upper Himalayas. India • • Located in Leh. It has long winter from October to April . .

CASE STUDY-III .

CASE STUDY-III .

CASE STUDY-III .

CASE STUDY-III .

Wall and roof insulation and double glazing Thicker walls. mass wall etc.IV COMPOSITE CLIMATE – COLD AND CLOUDY OVERVIEW OF DESIGN PRINCIPLESExposed surface areas are reduced by careful orientation and shape of building. • Skylights—domed or pyramid shaped—with baffles to control glare are more efficient. • • • • • • .CASE STUDY . Reduce shading on walls and glazed portions. Providing air locks and lobbies darker colours inside as well as outside. • Glazing area should be 3 to 9 per cent of the floor area to provide adequate lighting levels. •  Sunspace and solarium with day-lighting strategies. Utilise heat from appliances and provide thermal storage mass like trombe wall.

P. . Himachal Pradesh  Climate : Cold and Cloudy  Brief description of building : This building is a ground and three-storeyed structure with its longer axis facing the east-west direction.CASE STUDY . STATE CO-OPERATIVE BANK BUILDING.IV H. SHIMLA   Location : Shimla. The smaller northern wall faces the prevailing winter winds from the north-eastern direction.

IV  South-facing Trombe wall and sunspace heats up the interior  South-facing solar collectors on the roof provide warm air.CASE STUDY . which is circulated by means of ducts  North face is protected by a cavity wall that insulates the building from prevailing winter winds  Western wall is provided with insulation as well as double glazing .

IV  Daylighting is enhanced by providing light shelves.  Skylight on the terrace also provides daylighting  Air lock lobbies are provided to reduce air exchange  .CASE STUDY .

CASE STUDY-IV .

org REFERENC ES .in/  http://www.slideshare.teriin.google.net/  www. https://www.co.

-BUCKMINISTER FULLERIN THANK YOU ! .THE BEST WAY TO PREDICT THE FUTURE IS TO DESIGN IT .