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Case Study: Collegiate


Female High Jumper
Sydnie Leroy
December 2015
SNES 549 Final Presentation

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Presentation Objectives

To discuss the athlete

Goals

Training Schedule

To review the diet


Prescription

What are we prescribing


and why

3 day menu plan

Discussion and conclusions

Supplements?

Did we meet the goals?

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About the Athlete

Female Collegiate Division 1


Track and Field Athlete

Specializes in the Jumping


Events (high jump, long
jump, etc)

59 and weighs 135 pounds


Trains indoor year-round
although competes outdoor
from March- June

Goals:

To maintain competing
weight but build strength
at the same time

High jump 1.85 meters


(which would qualify for
Division 1 National Finals)

Improve technique

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Training Schedule

This athlete is in pre-season from September 1 to December 15 th

Would train Monday through Saturday pre-season from 3:30 to 5:30


Monday- Friday. 3 days a week (M/W/F) this athlete will spend an
additional hours (5:30- 6:30) weight lifting

Monday and Wednesday are high jump technique day, Tuesday and
Thursday are sprint and power day, and Friday would be a
conditioning circuit

Saturday morning at 10 am this athlete will run stadium steps

From December 15th June 1 this athlete is in season

Monday- jump day and weight lifting

Tuesday- power and sprints

Wednesday- jump day and weight lifting

Thursday- Endurance and long sprints

Friday- light pre-meet shake-out work out

Saturday- competition

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Dietary Prescription
Carbohydrates

Should be consuming about 5-7 g /kg body weight of


Carbs

body weight of 135 lbs (61 kg)

302- 428 grams of carbohydrates per day

1208 to 1712 kcals per day from carbs

Out of a total 2600 kcal diet, this is between 46% and 66% of her
daily diet from carbohydrates

Timing:
Needs to consume a high- carbohydrate meal 1-4 hours before
training
Note: some days when she is focusing on sprints and endurance
she will need to be at the upper recommendation for
carbohydrate intake

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Dietary Prescription
Proteins

Should be consuming about 1.2- 1.7 g /kg body weight


of protein

body weight of 135 lbs (61 kg)

73- 104 grams of proteins per day

657- 936 kcals per day from proteins

Out of a total 2600 kcal diet, this is between and 25 % and


36%of her daily diet from proteins

Timing:
Needs to consume protein immediately post-workout
Note: some days when she is strength training, she may need
to increase her protein intake and consume towards the
upper recommended intake

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Dietary Prescription
Fats

Should be consuming about 1 g /kg body weight of Fats

body weight of 135 lbs (61 kg)

61g of fats per day

550g per day from proteins

Out of a total 2600 kcal diet, this about 21% of her daily diet
from fats

Timing:
Should not consume a high-fat meal within 1-4 hours of
training
Note: This athlete may need to decrease this amount even
more to increase her carbohydrates and proteins to meet
her goal of maintaining weight but getting stronger

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Dietary Prescription
Supplementation

If this athlete is following the prescribed diet plan, she


will not need to consume supplements

Exception:

Because she is a female athlete, she may be iron deficient

She will need to be screened for this and if her iron is low,
we will include more high-iron foods in her diet or
consider an iron supplement

If this athlete is unable to eat a high-protein meal or snack


immediately post-workout we may consider a protein
powder shake or drink, because the timing of this protein
intake is very important

3 Day Menu
Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Breakfast

1 cup of vanilla fat-free


yogurt
1 whole wheat bagel with 1
TBS peanut butter spread

1.5 cups of quick cooked


oatmeal with cup raw
blueberries and cup raw
strawberries

2 large eggs fried with


vegetable oil, served with
a tomato, an avocado,
and cup of cheddar
cheese
1 medium banana

Lunch

2 cups of Caesar salad with


dressing
1 turkey sandwich with
lettuce, tomato, avocado,
and cheese on whole wheat
bread

2 cups of whole wheat pasta


with tomato sauce and
cup of low fat mozzarella
cheese and 1 cup of summer
squash/ zucchini

1 cup of macaroni and


cheese
1 medium chicken breast,
baked
1 cup of fresh, cooked
broccoli

Pre Workout Snack

Granola Bar

1 large banana and 1


granola bar

1 whole wheat English


muffin with 2 tbs hummus

Post workout snack

1.5 oz almonds

1 small peanut butter and


jelly sandwich
cup of trail mix(nuts,
seeds, dried fruits)

cup of almonds

Dinner

I medium baked chicken


breast with 1 cup of broccoli
and 1.5 cups of brown rice

1 medium salmon fillet


baked in olive oil
1.5 cups of asparagus

2 cups of vegetarian chili


2 large slices whole wheat
bread from a bakery, plain
1 cup fruit salad

Evening Snack

1 cup vanilla low fat frozen


yogurt

1 cup vanilla low fat vanilla


yogurt

whole-wheat bagel

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Conclusions and Discussion
Did we meet our goals?
Prescribed diet slightly high in:
Fat

(would probably want to lower this slightly for her to build strength,
but the athlete should try this diet and see how she personally feels)
Salt

(could be good for an athlete who is sweating heavily and losing a


high amounts of sodium)

Room for improvement:


There

is always room for more fruits and vegetables in an athletes diet

Important to remember: it is necessary to form an


open and honest communication dialogue with the
athlete and tailor the diet prescription with their
feedback

Click icon to add


picture

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Further Questions or
Comments?

Feel free to contact me

Sydnie Leroy

Marywood University, M
Candidate

srleroy@m.marywood.e

ences

d, M., & Doyle, A. (2012). Protein. InNutrition for Sport and Exercise(2nd ed.). Belmont, California: Wa