Finding Alternatives in a

Copyleft
©

World

Helen Poot Christopher Rios

= © = + ©

Definition of Copyleft

rights rights

History

1983

GNU Project Founded

Richard Stallman The Free Software Movement

1985

1998

The Open Source Movement

2001

•The freedom to run the program, for any purpose (freedom 0). •The freedom to study how the program works, and adapt it to your needs (freedom 1). •The freedom to redistribute copies so you can help your neighbor (freedom 2). •The freedom to improve the program, and release your improvements to the public, so that the whole community benefits (freedom 3).
Access to the source code is a precondition for freedom 1 & 3.

The Free Software Definition

Created in 2001

Not meant for Software, but inspired by the GPL

Trying to create balance, compromise , and moderation in copyright

Note: Creative Commons is no longer endorsed or supported by Richard Stallman.

ow

Work

Licenses

Deeds

Attributio n

Must give credit to the creator.

Noncommercial

May not use content for commercial purposes.

Share Alike

Must license any derivatives under the same original license.

No Derivative s

May not create derivatives.

Licenses

Attribution

Attribution No Derivatives Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike

Attribution Non-commercial Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives

Attribution Share Alike

Resources

Content

Creative Commons

flickr.com

ccMixter

the Freesound Project Open Clip Art Library

Software

OpenOffice.org

SourceForge.net

Firefox

Ubuntu Linux

Audacity

Audacity. Retrieved April 2, 2007 from http://audacity.sourceforge.net/ ccMixter. Retrieved April 2, 2007 from http://ccmixter.org/ Copyleft. Retrieved March 26, 2007 from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copyleft Creative commons. Retrieved April 2, 2007 from http://creativecommons.org/ “Some rights reserved”: building a layer of Reasonable copyright . Retrieved March 21, 2007 from http://creativecommons.org/about/history Creative commons licenses. Retrieved March 21, 2007 from http://creative commons.org/about/licenses/meet-the-licenses Creative Commons (2006). Learn more about creative commons. Retrieved April 14, 2007 from http://creativecommons.org/learnmore/ flickr.com. Retrieved April 2, 2007 from http://flickr.com/ The free software definition. Retrieved March 26, 2007 from http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/free-sw.html The freesound project. Retrieved April 2, 2007 from http://freesound.iua.upf.edu/ OpenOffice.org. Retrieved April 2, 2007 from http://www.openoffice.org/ SourcForge.net. Retrieved April 2, 2007 from http://sourceforge.net/ Ubuntu Linux. Retrieved April 2, 2007 from http://www.ubuntu.com/ The font used in this document is Tuffy, available at http://www.tulric

Source s

Dobroide. (2006). 20061030.metal.door.open.ms.flac. Retrieved at http://freesound.iua.upf.edu/samplesViewSingle.php?id=24645 Lessig, L. (2002). The future of ideas: the fate of the commons in a connected world. New York. Vintage. Neonaeon. (2006). Out1.wav. Retrieved at http://freesound.iua.upf.edu/samplesViewSingle.php?id=16573 Purbrick, J. (2005). Hardcore. Retrieved at http://ccmixter.org/media/files/jimpurbrick/1902 Simpson, C. (2005). Copyright for schools: a practical guide. Worthin gton. Linworth Books. Stallman, R. (2007). What is copyleft? Retrieved March 26, 2007 from http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/copyleft.html Steuer, E. (2006). Share the wealth. Remix (June), p. 64. Williams, E. (2006). Made for sharing. why creative commons is an idea whose time has come. Creative Review, (June), 3. Williams, S. (2002). Free as in freedom: Richard Stallman’s crusade for free software. New York: O’Reilly Media.

Source s

©

2007 Helen Poot and Christopher Rios This presentation licensed under a Creative Commons license

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