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Stanley Milgram

RELATED TO THE READING WHEN GOOD PEOPLE DO EVIL BY PHILIP


ZIMBARDO IN THE HUMAN RIGHTS AND GLOBAL JUSTICE SECTION

Biography (Early life)

Milgram was born on August 15, 1933 in New York City, New York
to his Jewish, immigrant parents, Samuel and Adele Milgram. He
was the second of three children.

Growing up, Milgrams father provided a modest income working


as a baker. After his father passed away in 1953, his mother,
Adele, took over the family bakery.

During Milgrams early life, he excelled academically and was a


great leader among his peers while he attended PS 77 and James
Monroe High School in the Bronx.

Biography (Professional life)

In 1954, Milgram received his


bachelors degree in political science
from Queens College in New York,
which he was able to attend tuitionfree.

After finishing school at Queens


College, Milgram applied to a Ph.D
program in social psychology at
Harvard University, however, he wasnt
accepted at first. He was later accepted
into the program, but this wasnt until
after he had enrolled as a student in
Harvards Office of Special students.

In 1960, Milgram received a Ph.D in


social psychology from Harvard
University.

Biography (Professional life)


continued

In 1963, Milgram served as an assistant


professor in the Department of Social
Relations at Harvard on a three-year
contract. After sometime, however, the
contract was extend for one additional
year, but with the lower rank of a
lecturer.

After completing his contract at Harvard,


he was later denied tenure primarily
because of his controversial obedience
experiment.

In 1967, Milgram accepted an offer to


become a tenured professor at the City
University of New York Graduate center.
He taught at this university until he died
on December 20, 1984, aged 51, of a
heart attack.

Most Notable Experiments

Obedience to authority (1963)

Small world phenomenon (1967)

Small world phenomenon (1967)