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GAS

DYNAMICS
ME 51000

Instructor: Carlos Larriba-Andaluz

SYLLABUS
Instructor: Dr. Carlos Larriba-Andaluz, Professor of Mechanical
Engineering
Phone: 317-274-8993. E-mail: clarriba@iupui.edu

Meeting Time: Mon-Wed, 6:00 p.m. 7:15 p.m. in SL 055

Office Hours: Friday, 2:00 pm 3:00 pm, OFFICE SL 164Q appt. is


encouraged

Prerequisite:
ME 310 or equivalent
Prerequisites by topic: Basic thermodynamic laws and concepts,
introductory fluid mechanics, heat transfer concepts, partial differential
equations.
Required Textbook: Gas Dynamics, vol. 1, Zucrow & Hoffman, Wiley.
Optional Textbook: Gas Dynamics, vol. 2, Zucrow & Hoffman, Wiley.

ME 51000 Course Policies and Requirements


1. Thoroughly review the prerequisite material for this course, especially
undergraduate fluid mechanics and thermodynamics. Previous knowledge of
heat transfer will be helpful.
2. Preparation. Study the relevant text material and notes before class.
3. The Course Outline provides a guide to course content. Lectures may
sometimes depart from the outline sequence, and will include additional
material.
4. Solve the assigned HW problems on your own, and stay up to date. Assigned
homework will be collected, and will be graded.
5. There will be one in-class midterm exam and one final examination. They will
cover all material presented in class.
6. Keep a course portfolio of all your work in the course, including homework,
tests, papers read, and your term paper. The course portfolio may be collected
at the final exam.
7. The course grade will be determined by:
Midterm
30%
Final or Project
30%
Homework
30%
Participation and Attendance 10%
8. Overall score needed for grades (Every letter includes three grades, e.g. A

ME 510 GAS DYNAMICS DAY BY DAY SYLLABUS


Month

Week

WEEK 1

Day

Lecture Topic

Jan 9th

Introduction & Syllabus


INTRODUCTION TO GAS
DYNAMICS:
Continuum Postulate Forces
acting on a Fluid, Density,
Velocity, and Stress at a point.

Jan 11th

Jan 16th
WEEK 2
Jan 18th
January
Jan 23rd

NO CLASS
MARTIN LUTHER KING
BASIC CONCEPTS
Eulerian vs. Lagrangian
Approach.
Substantial Derivative
Lipschitz (Reynolds) Transport
Theorem.
GOVERNING EQUATIONS I
Conservation of Mass
Newtons Second Law

Required
Readings from
Textbook

1-1 to 1-4

2-1 to 2-4

2-5 to 2-6

WEEK 3
Jan 25

WEEK 4

th

Jan 30th

GOVERNING EQUATIONS II
Thermodynamics First Law,
Thermodynamics Second Law
ONE DIMENSIONAL FLOW
CONCEPT
Governing Equations in 1D

2-7 to 2-9
1-15 to 1-17
3-1 to 3-7, 3-12

Feb 1

st

Feb 6th

WEEK 5
Feb 8th

Feb 13th
(PROJECT DESIGN
STARTS)

February
WEEK 6

Feb 15th

Feb 20th
WEEK 7
Feb 22nd
WEEK 8

Feb 27th

ONE DIMENSIONAL
FLOW CONCEPT
Governing Equations in 1D
COMPRESSIBLE FLOW.
Stagnation Conditions
Critical Area
ISENTROPIC FLOW
1D Flow with Area Change.
Limiting Conditions and
Choking. Downstream
Boundary Conditions
PERFECT GASES
LAVAL NOZZLE
Converging diverging
Nozzles
Varying the BackPressure
FLOW
FLOW WITH FRICTION
Governing Equations
Fanno Line
FANNO LINE for Perfect
Gases.
DIMENSIONAL ANALYSIS

1-D STEADY ISOTHERMAL


CONSTANT-AREA
FLOW with HEAT
TRANSFER
Rayleigh Line, Perfect Gases

1-15 to 1-17
3-1 to 3-7, 3-12

3-8 to 3-11

4-1 to 4-5

4-6,4-7

5-1 to 5-4

5-5, 5-7

6-1 to 6-5

WEEK 8

WEEK 9

March 6th

FLOW with HEAT


TRANSFER
Rayleigh Line, Perfect
Gases
REVIEW

March 8th

MIDTERM EXAM

March 1st

March 13th
March 15th
March 20th

WEEK 10
March 22nd
March
March 27th

WEEK 11

6-1 to 6-5

SPRING
BREAK
MASS ADDITION
Governing Equations

9-1 to 9-3

GENERAL 1D FLOW
Governing Equations
and Influence
Coefficients

9-5

NORMAL SHOCKWAVES
Equations. Normal
Shockwaves in Perfect
Gases

7-1 to 7-4

OBLIQUE
SHOCKWAVES
Perfect Gases
Supersonic Flows over
wedges and cones

7-6,7-7,7-10

March 29th

April 3rd
WEEK 12
April 5th
April 10th
WEEK 13

April 12th

April 17th
April

WEEK 14
April 19th
April 24th
WEEK 15

April 26th

May

WEEK 16

May 1st

SUPERSONIC FLOWS
Reflections and
Intersections
7-11,7-12, 7-13
Supersonic Wind Tunnels.
Supersonic Breathing
EXPANSION WAVES
8-1 to 8-4, 8.8
General Features
REVIEW

PROJECT DESIGN

PROGRESS PRESENTATION
MULTIDIMENSIONAL FLOW I
Introduction, Coordinate
Systems.
10-1 to 10-6
Stream lines, trajectories.
Circulation Rotation and
Vorticity
MULTIDIMENSIONAL FLOW II
Croccos and Kelvins Theorem
10-7 to 10-12
Potential and Stream Functions
METHOD OF CHARACTERISTICS
General Theory. Partial
12-1 to 12-3
Differential Eqs.
STEADY TWO DIMENSIONAL
FLOW
Application to Steady 2D Planar
12-4, 12-5
Axisymmetric Irrotational
Chap. 16 (Vol 2)
Supersonic Flow
Numerical Implementation
REVIEW
TAKE HOME EXAM 48h
PRESENTATIONS

PROJECT: GENERALIZED 1D NOZZLE

WHAT IS
GAS DYNAMICS?

POOL OF
SCIENCE
Mechanics
Solid
Mechanics

Fluid
Mechanics

Fluid Statics

Fluid
Dynamics

Gases

Compressibl
e Flow
(Gas

Liquids

Hydrodynamic
s&
Incompressibl
e
Aerodynamics

When is a gas considered Compressible?

Expansio
n

Compressibilit
y

Why is a gas so
compressible?

Gas transmits information that an

How far back can we send information?

DSMC Calculator by Graeme Bird

Mach Number

a = speed of
sound

M>0.3
Compressi
ble

"Mach Number Flow Regimes" by


Rchisena92

What is density? The continuum postulate

Extracted from Gas Dynamics Vol I. by


Zucrow and Hoffman

Knudsen number

Mean Free
Path
Characteristic
Length of our
Particle

Applications

Nozzles (Rockets, jet engines, gas and steam turbines)


Diffusers (Aircraft engine inlet, turbomachinery exits)
Inlets (Supersonic Inlets, )
Ducts (With friction, heat transfer, )
Combustors (Chemical Reactions, heat and mass transfer)
Mass addition (Rockets)
Shock Tubes & Wave devices (in order to simulate actual
explosions and their effects)