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STRUCTURE IN ENGLISH

Subject

DISCUSSANT: ALAIZA L. ELIMOS


COURSE AND YEAR: BSED 2

EMBEDDED
CLAUSE

EMBEDDED CLAUSE:
Pronoun in embedded clause take the case dictated by their
function in the embedded clause, not by their position in the
main clause.
Example:
1.We all love whoever gives cheerfully anf freely.
2.In traditional Muslim communities , girls are married off to
whomever their family choose.
3.Is he the officer whom you said I should report to?

EMBEDDED CLAUSE
The pronoun who and whoever generally follow the
same rules. However, when these begin the sentences
in the informal register, as in conversation or
advertisement, these are usually in the nominative
form regardless of the function in the sentences.
Example:
1.Who do you trust to be the leader free world and
president of U.S?
2.Who can you rely on full control of your
investment?

Embedded clause
However, advises the distinction between WHOM and
WHOMEVER in formal writing, especially in academic
papers.
Example:
1.Whom should this community development project
benefits?
2.There is a need to adress the dislocation of
whomever the revised policy statement on the settlers
affects.

Embedded clause
A variation involving different cases is possible for
clauses embedded in sentences with verb like think,
feel, consider,like,want, etc.., with the embedded verb
in the infinitives.
Example:
Matrix: The judge thought______.
Insert: She is pretty.
RESULT: The judge thought her to b pretty.
The judge thought (that) she id pretty.

Embedded clause
Another example:
Matrix: Do you want ______?
Insert: We girls go hunting.
Result:
Do you want that we girls go hunting?
Do you want us to go hunting?

Comparative with
AS or THAN

Comparative with as or than


In the comparative sentences, many grammar books
insist using the subjective cases after the word as or
than, noting that the complete comparative sentences
actually consist of two clauses, with as or than
functioning s conjunction:
He has as many degrees as she has.
His wife is smarter then he is.
Father says he has had more experiences than I had.

Comparative with as or than


Omission of the second predicate results in the
following:
He has as many degrees as she.
His wife is smarter the he.
Father says he has had more experiences than i.

Comparative with as or than


However,many modern grammars accept the common
use of the objective case here,arguing that in
comparative constructions, the word as and than
function as preposition.
Example:
He has as many degree as her.
His wife is smarter then him.
Father says he has had more experience than me.

Comparative with as or than


You have to be careful when you decide to use as or
than as preposition rather then as conjunction; the
resulting sentences may become vague or ambigious.
Example:
My ten-years old boy is taller than me.
The audition master liked my song than the producer.

Comparative with as or than

My ten-years old boy is taller than I was at that age.


The audition master liked my song better than the
producer did.

Complement (or
object) of the
preposition but and
like

Complement of the preposition but and like

The word BUT when we use as a preposition, dictates


the objective case for its complement (or object)
pronoun.
Example:
Nobody but him was able to complete the test.

Complement of the preposition but and like


Some grammar books analyze the above sentence as an
ellipsis of a compound sentences using BUT as
conjunction.
Example:
Nobody was able to complete the test, but he was.

Complement of the preposition but and like

The word LIKE is a preposition and should not be


confused with AS, which can function eiather as
preposition or conjunction.
Winston tastes good like a cigarette should.
Winston tastes good as a cigarette should.
The Spanish are fond of rich food, just like us.

Thank you for


Listening!